Download Birth: A History fb2

by Tina Cassidy
Download Birth: A History fb2
Women's Health
  • Author:
    Tina Cassidy
  • ISBN:
    0701181192
  • ISBN13:
    978-0701181192
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Chatto & Windus (April 24, 2007)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Women's Health
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1281 kb
  • ePUB format
    1117 kb
  • DJVU format
    1910 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    464
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi lit azw


Random House, 28 февр Читать весь отзыв.

Random House, 28 февр. The engaging and eye-opening story of how we and our ancestors entered the world. Through the frigid, blurry January weeks after George was born, I found myself suddenly housebound with time to ruminate - though not time to cook or take a shower Читать весь отзыв.

The history of birth, as Cassidy deftly tells it, might well be summed up as What No One Ever Expected When . A fascinating book about the history of modern childbirth.

The history of birth, as Cassidy deftly tells it, might well be summed up as What No One Ever Expected When They're Expecting: Crank-and-pulley birthing systems and fish-bladder vacuum extractors. Man-midwives in drag and obstetricians trained on 'mock mothers. With wit and aplomb, Cassidy covers the ongoing march of birthing fads, from the surreal horrors of the Twilight Sleep to Lamaze, doulas, and the current craze for elective C-sections. I would say it did feel a little biased toward a particularly secularist point of view, which for the subject wasn't a deal breaker. I found many aspects shocking.

Последние твиты от Tina Cassidy (oryOfBirth). Tina Cassidy начал(а) читать. Boston, Massachusetts. Tina Cassidy‏ oryOfBirth 26 авг. 2018 г. Еще. Скопировать ссылку на твит.

Cassidy chronicles the plethora of superstitions, fads, and scientific theories (good and bad)that have d Did you know that 18th century doctors wishing to observe an actual birth frequently sneaked into the labor room wearing a dress? Or that it's possible for a woman to perform a cesarean section on herself?

The Boston Globe Published to widespread acclaim, Tina Cassidy’s smart, engaging book is the first world history of. .

The Boston Globe Published to widespread acclaim, Tina Cassidy’s smart, engaging book is the first world history of childbirth in fifty years. Why is it that every culture and generation seems to have its own ideas about the best way to give birth?

Springing from a lively, personal introduction in which Tina Cassidy describes her grandmother's, he.

Springing from a lively, personal introduction in which Tina Cassidy describes her grandmother's, he.

Birth, A History by Tina Cassidy is published by Chatto and Windus ISBN: 978 0 701 18119 . After the journalist Tina Cassidy had an emergency caesarean, she overheard her husband ask the doctor what would have happened before c-sections. She was horrified by the doctor’s reply - that the baby would have died in the birth canal and they would have had to remove the foetus piece by piece. She discusses her findings with Jenni and the Medical historian Dr Ornella Moscucci. Birth, A History by Tina Cassidy is published by Chatto and Windus ISBN: 978 0 701 18119 2.

Her book has real value for women who want to understand why the reality of giving birth didn't match their careful plans and expectations

And maybe it wasn't strictly necessary to include a recipe for placenta pizza topping (from a 1983 issue of Mothering magazine). Her book has real value for women who want to understand why the reality of giving birth didn't match their careful plans and expectations. New York Magazine Birth is gorily fascinating.

What is the best way to give birth? Find out in this wonderfully readable, encyclopedic history of Birth. It fills a large gap in the market and will appeal to all men and women who are starting a family, as well as to those who are simply curious.

Mave
I would hope that one would read some reviews before giving this book as a gift; I got a good laugh reading reviews by people who have given the book as a baby shower gift. Here's a tip: don't give this book as a baby shower gift. It isn't a fluffy pregnancy guide or coffee table photo book of adorable tiny hands and little noses. This book shares information about the actual HISTORY of childbirth, which can be messy and pretty disgusting and/or disturbing! Did you not know that? If all you know about childbirth is the made-up, gorgeous, reclined, sweat-free actress in your favorite rom-com, this book will probably give you nightmares. Childbirth is a messy process, and there have been lots of horrible things that have happened over the centuries due to poor planning, hygiene, resources, and opportunities. I checked this book out from the library at 3 months pregnant with my second child, and bought it on amazon within a few days so I could highlight my favorite parts. I love the author's documentary-like writing style and I've found myself staying up past my bedtime to get to the next era of history or freaky story. I guess I don't have a sensitive stomach, because I am finding the stories to be fascinating even though I am pregnant. In modern times, in America, with so many choices available to me, I am not afraid of having to give birth amongst rats in a hot, dirty room with hay and rats covering the floor. We have some really amazing healthcare and technology (which we grotesquely overuse, but that's another rant for another book), and I for one am fascinated by gaining knowledge about the ways in which other women in different times and places have given and continue to give birth. Women are truly amazing creatures.
Hamrl
Interesting view of childbirth through the centuries. I'm not sure where her 1% estimate for death due to birth came from, as the rate is much higher than that even in places with good midwifery and limited access to hospitals. There's good reason why there is so much ambivalence giving birth worldwide through many different cultures. Otherwise a nice, engaging read
Mettiarrb
Interesting and informative book, but I found it a little rough reading sometimes. Some chapters were data-rich and well-edited, while others seemed bare bones and under researched. WAY too much explanation and multiple mentions of craniotomy. I'm currently pregnant and had to skip some of them because it was too much for me to digest. I agree with some other reviewers that the author has an obvious agenda and wove some politics into this book, so the reader should keep that in mind. She is very evidently against traditional medical intervention and very pro-new age approaches to birth. As someone who personally would love to deliver at home, try a waterbirth, or whatever new resource might be available to me, I have complicated pregnancies and have no choice but to deliver in a hospital in the OR. The author leaves very little room for such situations and to some extent, she demonizes doctors and hospitals.
Deeroman
I have never been pregnant, nor do I plan on becoming so in the near future; however, I am fascinated by maternity throughout history. I read this book about six months ago. This book inspired me to dig deeper into maternity in the mid nineteenth century, and I wrote a research paper for a history class that not only got me a 98, but intrigued my history professor. The author touches on so many interesting subjects. Although some were taken aback by the morbid reality that was childbirth before we knew it today, I loved it. I had no idea that our foremothers were given medicine that caused psychotic episodes, and were completely forgotten after the birth was over-and they chose it! That was what the happening drug to ease childbirth was at that time! Crazy... I talked to women over 60 years old to hear their take on what they remember from those days. I am STILL so fascinated! I am currently looking for books similar to this one, and figured I would leave a review while I am here. Read it! It may not be for currently pregnant women, as some of it may be a bit scary, but every woman should read this. Enjoy! Let me know if there is anyone with suggestions on future reads. Thanks.
Dordred
A fascinating book about the history of modern childbirth. I would say it did feel a little biased toward a particularly secularist point of view, which for the subject wasn't a deal breaker. I found many aspects shocking. Some, I knew about, but not in great detail. There are many parts that are extremely disturbing, but history is what it is, and that isn't always pretty. A good look at where we have come and what we could still improve.
Tojahn
As a nurse and mother I found the subject interesting and appreciated the historical account and details. I had no idea how awful birth had been for some. I am appalled to think that there are women who are allowed to "choose" c-sections! Major surgery, pain, limited mobility, infection (a friend died from flesh eating bacteria). It was happily Lamaze for me and home packing lunches in two days (OK, Mom came and helped - love that woman!)
Thordibandis
The book lived up to my expectations. As a mother who had a phenomenal first birth with a midwife in a hospital, I kept questioning why so many friends had sections and what the hell would have happened to all of them 100, 500, 1000 years ago if they "needed" modern med to survive the birth. The answers were at times horrifying, and while I wouldn't take this source as 100 percent truth and if I wanted to know more I'd dig for some primary sources, it was a good, concise, answer to what birth was like for precious generations!