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by Charles Duhigg
Download Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change fb2
Psychology & Counseling
  • Author:
    Charles Duhigg
  • ISBN:
    0434020362
  • ISBN13:
    978-0434020362
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Heinemann Educational Books (April 1, 2012)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Psychology & Counseling
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1311 kb
  • ePUB format
    1324 kb
  • DJVU format
    1589 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    903
  • Formats:
    azw docx docx azw


The Power of Habit is a work of nonfiction.

The Power of Habit is a work of nonfiction. Any resulting resemblance to persons living or dead is entirely coincidental and unintentional. Published in the United States by Random House, an imprint of.

We visit laboratories where neuroscientists explore how habits work and where, exactly, they reside in our . I was most interested in how the book described changing a habit. Let’s face it, we all have habits we want to change.

We visit laboratories where neuroscientists explore how habits work and where, exactly, they reside in our brains. To accomplish this we need to keep the cue and reward, but change the routine. I’ll use an example from my own life to illustrate. I love chocolate, and to make it worse I love to eat at it night. Well I love to eat at night because that is how I formed the habit some time ago.

In The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Along the way we learn why some people and companies struggle to change, despite years of trying, while others seem to remake themselves overnight.

In his book The Power of Habit Charles Duhigg approaches the subject of what habits are and how we can ultimately change them. The Book Garden Blog). Inspiring stuff!" (Counsel). The Power of Habit steps sideways into science and brain chemistry to back up its key message: that identifying and implementing keystone habits is the difference between success and failure, whatever your goals

We can choose our habits once we know how. Once you understand that habit habits can change, you have .

We can choose our habits once we know how. Once you understand that habit habits can change, you have the freedom - and the responsibility - to remake them. To modify a habit, you must decide to change it. You must consciously accept the hard work of identifying the cues and rewards that drive the habits’ routines, and find alternatives

The Power of Habit is a work of nonfiction.

Published in the United States by Random House, an imprint of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York

Why We Do What We Do and How to Change It. CHARLES DUHIGG. Published in the United States by Random House, an imprint of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York. RANDOM HOUSE and colophon are registered trademarks of Random House, Inc. ISBN 978-1-4000-6928-6 eBook ISBN 978-0-679-60385-6. Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper. Illustrations by Anton Ioukhnovets.

However, sometimes we get caught into negative habits The power of weak ties – Rosa Parks protest on the bus in Alabama in December 1955 was not the first of such insurrections.

However, sometimes we get caught into negative habits. The power of weak ties – Rosa Parks protest on the bus in Alabama in December 1955 was not the first of such insurrections. The reason it took off and helped prick a nation’s conscience was the power of her connections across multiple groups. She had what sociologists call ‘weak ties’. They deeply cared for her so were prepared to get involved. People who jump from one network to another are actually more powerful than those at the heart of one group.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. It's basically applying behaviourism to people's desire to effect personal change in their own habits

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. It's basically applying behaviourism to people's desire to effect personal change in their own habits. There's some solid science there, so in general I approve of the approach. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Takes us to the edge of scientific discoveries and explains why habits exist and how they can be changed. This title offers an understanding of human nature and its potential for transformation. It helps us to learn why some people and companies struggle to change, despite years of trying, while others seem to remake themselves overnight.

Broadcaster
Two halves coexist within this book’s covers. One is outstanding; the other is a bit sloppy. Part one is the heart of the book; it explains what habits are about, where they come from, how they’re hard-wired into our brains, and how they can be enormously powerful —both to enslave us and to free us if we only we learn how to handle them well (the book’s mission). I found this part of the book to be truly outstanding: well-researched, engagingly written and extremely persuasive. It combines scientific research, personal life-stories and journalistic interviews to great effect.

While the 1st part is circumscribed to the individual level of analysis, on parts 2 and 3 the author takes the analysis from the micro to organizations (meso-level) and societies (macro-level). The author describes “the power of weak ties” of social networks, and claims that it helps understand the rise of social movements —which it clearly does. But in his explanation, networks are rebranded as “the habit of peer pressure”. Networks —as well as peer pressure, or culture— can be powerful forces for change, undoubtedly. But networks are not habits —as per his own definition. Different phenomena are conflated into the concept of habits, and in doing so the concept loses elegance and consistency.

Intellectually, the book is revealing. On a personal level, it is incredibly useful —and I’m thankful to the author for writing it. I would have limited the book claims to the phenomena it can explain beyond any reasonable doubt. By taking the concept of habits beyond what it can solidly explain, parts 2 & 3 detract a bit of value and credibility from the book. Were it not for that, I would have given 5 stars to the book. In balance, this is still a great book that --with the caveat expressed-- I strongly recommend.
Zugar
I really wanted to like this book...

But what I wanted more than that were clear and concrete tactics or strategies to "hack" my habits...

Strategies and tactics that were groundbreaking, clear, repeatable, and effectively "life changing"...

Nope. Not so much.

I grade content quality by number of under-linings, margin notes, and folded pages I've set at the end of the read...

It scored extremely low in all of those categories. So it's not particular dense with usefulness.

A few other things I didn't like...

This book is 95% story, or anecdote. I'm not really into stories. I'd read a novel for a story. I read non-fiction to learn something useful- and prefer to do it quickly.

The stories themselves are delivered non-sequentially...
For example:
story A beginning
story B beginning
story C beginning
Story D beginning

To understand story A we need to story B. To understand story B we need story C. To understand story C we need story D.

Then story A's middle or ending
Then story B's middle or ending
Then story C's middle or ending
Then story D's middle or ending

It might be interesting to write this way, but it's an irritating read. Who wants their thought sequences disparate like this?

This distracting structure could have been redeemed if there were meaningful conclusions or anything actionable amidst the mire.

But there was not.

Overall, is it worth reading? Yes...if you have nothing else very interesting to read.
tamada
Duhigg explores what science has to teach us about how habits are formed, how they function, how they can be modified and how they influence our lives and our business world. The book is divided into three parts: The Habits of Individuals, The Habits of Successful Organizations, and the Habits of Societies.
Based on studies of animal behavior and human behavior, we (that is rats, monkeys and humans) form habits the same way. There is a cue of some kind that triggers a habit, followed by some form of routine that has been completed memorized and operates more or less automatically, followed by some form of reward that reinforces the habit. Whether it is buckling our seat belt, brushing out teeth, smoking a cigarette or using heroin, this same habit loop operates in all of us.
The brain creates habits because it simplifies our activities. If we had to consciously decide and think out everything we do every day throughout the day from scratch it would be overwhelming for the brain. Habits are little routines that automate aspects of our behavior. We are not usually conscious that the habit is being formed, and once it is in place we need not expend much thought to follow it. It is a very effective efficiency that our minds use to free us up to think about other things.
Since we now know how a habit is formed and how they function we can modify existing habits and create new ones. We must identify the right cue which leads to the desired routine which is then followed by the reward. We must know in advance, or expect, the reward to motivate us to engage in the routine. The reward generates endorphins in the brain which are powerful motivators. They motivate us to repeat the routine every time the cue occurs. It is a bit more complex than that, but that is the gist of it.
Duhigg goes on to explain in fascinating detail how studies have shown us how we can modify a habit and how to replace one habit with another. This is very important because we can learn from it how to replace a bad habit (smoking) with a good one (exercise).
Certain habits also develop in organizations and in societies and they come together to create a culture, whether it is the culture of a corporation or the culture of a society. Culture, it seems, is primarily driven by key habits.
What I found useful about this book:
This book helps us understand how habits are formed and how we can use them to our benefit, change them when we need to and replace them when necessary. Duhigg does warn the reader that although we understand the way habits are made and altered it is not always easy to do it. Determining the actual cue for example can take some experimentation and work.
Readability/Writing Quality:
The book is very well written. It is engaging. It contains lots of references to studies and science but not in a dry or boring way. It is a series of fascinating stories. It is very well organized.
Notes on Author:
Charles Duhigg is an award winning investigative reporter for the New York Times.
Other Books by This Author:
Smarter, Faster, Better
Related Website:[...]
Three Great Ideas You Can Use:
1. Habits all function in the same basic way: a cue begins a behavior routine which ends in a reward. Once we understand this we can understand how habits work and how to change them or use them.
2. We are manipulated every day by business through habits. Marketing has become in many ways habit focused.
3. Once we know how to form and change a habit we can gain more real control over our own behaviors; we can replace bad habits and create good ones.

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business