» » Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human

Download Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human fb2

by Matt Ridley
Download Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human fb2
Psychology & Counseling
  • Author:
    Matt Ridley
  • ISBN:
    0060544465
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060544461
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperAudio; Abridged edition (April 2003)
  • Subcategory:
    Psychology & Counseling
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1541 kb
  • ePUB format
    1214 kb
  • DJVU format
    1490 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    703
  • Formats:
    docx mbr doc lrf


' 'For me the book never really excites. During the controversies about human sociobiology and the importance of human genetics 20 or 30 years ago, 'Nature via Nurture' could have been just what one wanted. ') Ruse's personal taste aside, I beg to differ.

Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes us Human is a 2003 book by Matt Ridley, in which Ridley discusses the interaction between environment and genes and how they affect human development. It was the 2003 winner of the National Academies Communication Award for best creative work that helps the public understanding of topics in science, engineering or medicine. Republished as The Agile Gene: How Nature Turns on Nurture (. ISBN 0-06-000678-1).

Nature Via Nurture book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nature via Nurture"; the title sounds like a dead horse that doesn't need to be beaten any more. If Ridley merely resolved the nurture/nature debate, which most of us already know, the book might be a bust. I decided to pick this one up because I love Ridley's work, and because it is read by the author. What a treat that is! With the author reading the book, you know that the nuances are correct, and that the abridgement isn't harming the message. However, Ridley's means of resolution is an unsuspected, yet dramatic, one. The book's strengths lie in applying the resolution of this dilemma to other dilemmas.

Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human. by Matt Ridley Referring to Lewis Carroll's Red Queen from Through the Looking-Glass, a character who has to keep running to stay in the same place, Matt Ridley demonstrates why sex is humanity's best strategy for outwitting its constantly mutating internal predators. T. The Origins of Virtue: Human Instincts and the Evolution of Cooperation.

In his incredibly insightful book, Nature via Nurture, Matt Ridley makes the point that it isn’t a case of nature versus .

In his incredibly insightful book, Nature via Nurture, Matt Ridley makes the point that it isn’t a case of nature versus nurture, but rather, it’s a case of nature via nurture. Nurture is effected by genes just as much as nature is. The more we discover genes that influence behaviour, the more we find that they work through nurture; and the more we find that animals learn, the more we discover that learning works though genes, says Ridley.

The phrase ‘nature and nurture’ is a convenient jingle of words, for it separates under two distinct heads the . He repeated the phrase in his next book Elementaries in 1582: ‘whereto nature makes him toward, but that nurture sets him forward’. Mulcaster was a curious character.

The phrase ‘nature and nurture’ is a convenient jingle of words, for it separates under two distinct heads the innumerable elements of which personality is composed. Born in Carlisle, he was a distinguished scholar and famous, if strict, educational reformer.

Nature via Nurture explores the complex and endlessly intriguing question of what makes us who we. .In February 2001 it was announced that the human genome contains not 100,000 genes, as originally postulated, but only 30,000.

Nature via Nurture explores the complex and endlessly intriguing question of what makes us who we ar. n February 2001 it was announced that the human genome contains not 100,000 genes, as originally postulated, but only 30,000. Yet again biology was to be stretched on the Procrustean bed of the nature-nurture debate.

As Matt Ridley beautifully describes in Nature via Nurture, our genes are in constant discussion with their surroundings. Nature operates through nurture. Genes are not, as the destructive metaphor has it, "blueprints", dispensing life's prescription from the sanctum of the nucleus. Each gene has the potential to do its thing; but what it does, within any one person (or mushroom or oak tree) depends in large measure on what it is allowed to do, by other genes, the rest of the cell, the body and the environment at large. Our nature is realised, made manifest, via nurture. Download the new Indpendent Premium app. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines.

the author of Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human; the critically acclaimed national bestseller Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23. Chapters; The Origins of Virtue: Human Instincts and the Evolution of Cooperation; and the New York. Chapters; The Origins of Virtue: Human Instincts and the Evolution of Cooperation; and the New York Times Notable Book The Red Queen: Sex and the Evolution of Human Nature. His books have been short-listed for six literary awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.

February, 2001, it was announced that the human genome contains not 100,000 genes, as originally expected, but only 30,000. This startling revision led some scientists to conclude that there are simply not enough human genes to account for all the different ways people behave; we must be made by nurture, not nature. Yet again biology was to be stretched on the Procrustean bed of the nature-nurture debate. Matt Ridley argues that the emerging truth is far more interesting than this myth. Nurture depends on genes, too, and genes need nurture. Genes not only predetermine the broad structure of the brain, they also absorb formative experiences, react to social cues, and even run memory. They are consequences as well as causes of the will.

Nature Via Nurture chronicles a revolution in our understanding of genes. Ridley recounts the hundred years' war between the partisans of nature and nurture to explain how this paradoxical creature, the human being, can be simultaneously free-willed and motivated by instinct and culture.

Read by Matt Ridley.


Thetalune
It is hard to disagree with Matt Ridley's basic argument, that it is long time this debate was put to bed. The book gets five stars because Matt quotes and discusses a lot of really interesting studies. Modern work on genetic switching show that our genetic make up is not cast in stone and that what we do and experience changes what we are. Given that it is in a sense all nature, Matt comes down fairly heavily on the more fixed aspects of nature. Some studies are truly surprising, like those that show twins bought up apart are MORE alike than those brought up together. But of course all these things are statistical, so you tend to miss what falls through the cracks. For example in a comparison of kids with and without criminal parents brought up by non-criminal families and with criminal-element families. Having criminal parents certainly increased your chances of getting in trouble, as does growing up in a criminal family, but something like 70 percent of those with criminal parents in criminal families did not have a problem. So the differences we are looking at, although big, hang between the 15 and 25 % of all groups that do get in trouble.That is big crack, and suggests there is almost some innate tendency to be honest, or at least not get caught. I did not find the section on free will very convincing, but that is okt, I really enjoyed the book, I learned quite a lot and it made me think. What more do you want?
Xwnaydan
This is a very good book about the confluence of factors that makes us human. It has always been obvious to parents that there is an interplay of nature and nurture that go into creating a child. It took the scientific community a little longer to realize this. But this book determines for the reader how genes are impacted by biology and environmental factors to make us who we are.
JoJolar
"Nature via Nurture"; the title sounds like a dead horse that doesn't need to be beaten any more. I decided to pick this one up because I love Ridley's work, and because it is read by the author. What a treat that is! With the author reading the book, you know that the nuances are correct, and that the abridgement isn't harming the message.
The discussions in this book are dramatically and importantly different from other discussions of "Nature/Nurture", and I can hardly recommend it strongly enough. What is different is the degree of specificity that Ridley brings to the conversation. He demonstrates from a dozen different points of view HOW causality flows both ways, from the genes to the environment and back. He also pokes holes in logical fallacies one hears all the time - for example, the assertion that a feature is not genetic because the specific genes have not (and in some cases may not ever) been identified. A well-constructed twin study positively identifies heritability of traits; tracking that heritability back to a spot on a chromosome is useful and interesting but not necessary.
There is also basic science here that the lay reader might not otherwise learn for years. For instance, until very recently it was thought that there was a one to one correlation between genes and their proteins. It was also unknown what, if any, purpose breaking genes apart into exons on the chromosome served. Now we have discovered that many - ninety five on one mouse gene - different versions of one exon can exist on the chromosome, allowing one gene to make many different versions of its protein. Different versions mediated by... environment, of course.
Much of the information here is counter-intuitive. For instance, the more egalitarian a society is, the more the heritabilaty of traits becomes manifest. Potentially confusing, certainly mind-bending, and who better than Ridley to explain it?
If you are interested in biology, read this book.
HelloBoB:D
Another Ridley home run! He's batting a thousand. Not bad for a popularizer of science.

Don't let the book's title fool you. If Ridley merely resolved the nurture/nature debate, which most of us already know, the book might be a bust. However, Ridley's means of resolution is an unsuspected, yet dramatic, one. The book's strengths lie in applying the resolution of this dilemma to other dilemmas. Not that this approach "answers" these dilemmas; indeed, maybe the reverse, it seems to complicate them. Therein lies the book's brilliance and novelty, while being entirely scientific.

For example, 18th C. philosopher David Hume raised doubts about humans' causal inferences, i.e., "cause-and-effect." E.g. The light goes out (effect). Caused by what: the filament, the glass, the wiring, the switch, the panel, or maybe something else? Many people, including scientists, dismissed Hume's skepticism as extreme and anti-scientific. Ridley's Fourth Chapter vindicates Hume, more dramatically than Hume himself (or Popper in 1944). The subject for discussion is "schizophrenia." The perennial nature/nurture debate and the theories its drawn are investigated, and given Ridley's insight and science's "evidence," the putative "cause(s)" of schizophrenia are all found wanting. How wanting? Incredibly wanting. But ironically, it's not all wrong. Mostly wrong. And it's revealed in, through, and by the prism of nature/nurture dispute, seen through the topic of schizophrenia. (The subject of causality in human behavior makes an important reappearance later.)

[N.B. A cautionary note. Chap. 3 seemed uncharacteristically long-winded and redundant. It passes and never recurs.]

Ridley's encyclopedic knowledge (what field of knowledge does he not know?) is breathtaking. His ability to coordinate all this diverse, even disparate, knowledge in defense of this thesis is extraordinary. To keep all the scientific jargon on an accessible level is masterful. To use an artful device with elegant prose adds creativity and imagination. The implications of these insights are even more stunning. Science does not get better than this!