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by Matthew Harvey Sommer
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Psychology & Counseling
  • Author:
    Matthew Harvey Sommer
  • ISBN:
    0804736952
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804736954
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stanford Univ Pr (May 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    440 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Psychology & Counseling
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1951 kb
  • ePUB format
    1753 kb
  • DJVU format
    1275 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    865
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Matthew Harvey Sommer. context for sexual behavior criminalized by the state, arguing that the eighteenth century in China was a time of profound change in sexual matters.

Matthew Harvey Sommer. This study of the regulation of sexuality in the Qing dynasty explores the social context for sexual behavior criminalized by the state, arguing that the eighteenth century in China was a time of profound change in sexual matters. During this time, the basic organizing principle for state regulation of sexuality shifted away from status, under which members of different groups had long been held to distinct standards of familial and sexual morality.

Matt Sommer's study of sex and law in late imperial China is a vivid and well-written portrayal of how law worked in several key situations involving the regulation of sexuality: marriage, adultery, prostitution, and sex between me. (NAN NÜ). "This is a valuable book which places the study o. . "This is a valuable book which places the study of sexuality in late imperial China on a much firmer footing than heretofore. Eighteenth-Century Studies). This path-breaking book describes how the Qing state dealth with jian, a Chinese term which the author translates as "illicit sexual intercourse".

Pornography, Society, and the Law In Imperial Germany. September 1981 · Central European History. K. TUORI, THE EMPEROR OF LAW: THE EMERGENCE OF ROMAN IMPERIAL ADJUDICATION (Oxford Studies in Roman Society and Law). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

This study of the regulation of sexuality in the Qing dynasty explores the social context for sexual behavior criminalized by the state, arguing that the eighteenth century in China was a time of profound change in sexual matters. During this time, the basic organizing principle for state regulation of sexuality shifted away from status, under which members of different groups had long been held to distinct standards of familial and sexual morality

Sommer's careful theorizing makes Sex, Law, and Society important reading for specialists in all periods.

Sommer's careful theorizing makes Sex, Law, and Society important reading for specialists in all periods. Matt Sommer's study of sex and law in late imperial China is a vivid and well-written portrayal of how law worked in several key situations involving the regulation of sexuality: marriage, adultery, prostitution, and sex between me. -NAN NÜ. "It will become a classic of non-Western legal history and required reading for anyone interested in the history of gender and human rights in Asia.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Changes in the criminalization of sexual behaviour during the Qing dynasty indicate that the 18th century in China was a time of profound change in sexual matters. Start by marking Sex, Law, and Society in Late Imperial China as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Shifts in official treatment of charges of adultery, rape, sodomy, widow chastity, and prostitution represented the imperial state's efforts to cope with disturbing social and demographic changes.

Part of the Law, Society, and Culture in China Series). This is the most illuminating text I've found on late Imperial Chinese society, and particularly on matters of gender, sexual beahvior and morality, and the growth of state-bureaucratic regulation of "private" life. This is the most illuminating text I've found on late Imperial Chinese society, and particularly on matters of gender, sexual beahvior and morality, and the growth of state-bureaucratic regulation of "private" life

This study of the regulation of sexuality in the Qing dynasty explores the social context for sexual behavior criminalized by the state, arguing that the eighteenth century in China was a time of profound change in sexual matters. During this time, the basic organizing principle for state regulation of sexuality shifted away from status, under which members of different groups had long been held to distinct standards of familial and sexual morality

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This book will be indispensible reading for China scholars studying late imperial law, traditional gender norms, the . Destination, rates & speeds. Matthew Harvey Sommer.

This book will be indispensible reading for China scholars studying late imperial law, traditional gender norms, the social life of the non-elite, and the history of the reach of the state. It is simultaneously a primer on traditional Chiense law and a study of law as 18th-century social engineering. Journal of Asian Studies This is a valuable book which places the study of sexuality in late imperial China on a much firmer footing than heretofore. Eighteenth-Century Studies. 6. Sex, Law, and Society in Late Imperial China (Law, Society, and Culture in China).

This study of the regulation of sexuality in the Qing dynasty explores the social context for sexual behavior criminalized by the state, showing how regulation shifted away from status to a new regime of gender that mandated a uniform standard of sexual morality and criminal liability for all people, regardless of their social status.

Falya
One of the best books on Chinese history I've ever read. Prior knowledge on Chinese culture and society very helpful
Macage
This is the most illuminating text I've found on late Imperial Chinese society, and particularly on matters of gender, sexual beahvior and morality, and the growth of state-bureaucratic regulation of "private" life.

Prevalent themes include prostitution (male and female, state-sponsored and state-banned); state and popular attitudes toward men and boys who had sex with other men and boys (this section suggests interesting things about the origins and causes of homophobia in our own culture); the changing legal and moral status of slaves; what Confucianism demanded of women in the family and the bedroom; and how women responded.

Sommer paints a comprehensive and vibrant picture of late-imperial Chinese sexual and family life that gives full credit to those who lived it for constantly thinking about their world, debating their beliefs, and negotiating with social and governmental forces in their quest for the good life. Neither bureaucrat nor peasant, man nor woman get the final word here. What farmers believed and did was neither controlled by nor isolated from the philosophical ruminations of jurists in Peking; meanwhile, scholars and emperors concerned themselves to a surprising degree with the behavior and virtues of the poor villagers of the hinterlands. Sommer analyzes each facet of this dynamic.

He is similarly nuanced in his treatment of patriarchy. Male jurists made the rules about what women would and must do, and could enforce those rules with self-assured brutality. But even illiterate women could manipulate Confucian philosophy and bureaucracy to their advantage. Sommer discusses many variations on this theme; the most entertaining involve pregnant widows who forced magistrates to dismiss adultery charges against them--by arguing immaculate conception! The magistrates might not have believed the accused's arguments, but Sommer explains why these eminent men lost their battles with illiterate and scandalous peasant women, and backed their audacious stories.

Sommer's arguments and observations are based on copious research. That his accounts stick so close to sources endow his book with enormous detail and credibility. You'll never have to wonder where he got a fact or idea, or why he believes it. He's too careful and thoughtful an historian.

But there's an additional benefit to this approach. Sommer brings the subjects of his study alive by presenting their stories in their own words--even the words of peasants and women, usually absent from pre-modern histories, but caught here in the transcripts of court testimonies. The extended passages he quotes from these sources are colorful, gritty, and full of the concerns and passions of ordinary imperial Chinese. I found these passages to be among the most enthralling and illuminating in the book.

I must say I disagree--heartily--with the reviewer who alleged that Sommer gets overwhelmed by the abundance of facts he has unearthed and fails to unify them conceptually. Sommer has found and articulates a clear social theory in this work. It is an inobvious theory, a deeply insightful one, and one argued very closely from the evidence. The combination of ceaseless attention to evidence and the inobviousness of the theory (especially to one not acquainted with history of gender and related fields--though these are certainly not necessary to enjoy the book) might combine to leave the reviewer, or other readers, with the feeling they've missed the theory for the trees.

But if so, then it's the reviewer, and not Professor Sommer, who's gotten overwhelmed by the evidence. Sommer introduces his theory in the Introduction, returns to it explicitly in every chapter, fleshes out the details and evidence throughout the book, and punctuates every detailed analysis with a reminder of the broader patterns. I don't know what else he could have done. This is not the kind of history where the point is the entertaining narrative. This is social history that grapples with big ideas; they're not obvious; they're complicated; a quick or inattentive read won't reveal them to you just because Sommer wrote down a lot of relevant words. To get out of the book what Sommer put into it, you have to think carefully and rigorously and with a bit of discipline. I think Sommer did an excellent job providing his reader with all the tools they need to make this intellectual journey, if they choose to.

That said, if you don't get the theory, the stories alone are still worth the read.
Detenta
This book is not entirely without merit. The amount of research the author has done is awesome - he copied out some 600 memorials on marital, sex offences, and family disputes, from the Beijing Archives alone. A further 80 memorials in the same category, were also copied from records in provincial bureaus. However, only a relatively small number of these cases are cited, presumably since the number of different types of sex type of crime is limited.
Illicit sex, rape and sodomy, are discussed in detail, but paedophilia is not considered as a separate subject, and is simply included under the heading of "rape," even when penile penetration did not take place and was just sexual molestation of young children. The subject of incest is ignored completely.
He gives brief details of what he calls the "ideal rapist," and records that most rapists were in their twenties or thirties, and his sample indicates that 67 percent had lowly or stigmatized occupations, including 22 agricultural laborers, one beggar, one barber, one soldier and three men out of work. Fourteen had more "respectable" occupations, mostly peasants, but two tailors, and one mat weaver. Most were poor. Most were unmarried. His conclusion is that the "ideal" rapist is young, "without property, status, family, or prospects - and hence with little stake in the social order."
He also gives brief details of the "ideal rape victim." Out of a sample of 50, twenty-eight were married, thirteen were unmarried daughters living at home, and seven were girls who were betrothed. Thirty-seven (74 percent) were raped at home. Eighteen of the victims suffered death by homicide or suicide. Eleven of the victims were eleven years of age or under. The author does not differentiate between penile penetration of these youngsters and molestation.
The sheer volume of cases the author has collected seems to have overwhelmed him, and the book becomes dangerously close to being redolent with statistics without reasoned resolution. One is drawn to the conclusion from reading this book that while rape, sodomy, and marital disputes unquestionably occurred during the Yuan, Ming, and Qing times, the percentage of court cases is relatively small, considering the size of the population.
The author boldly faces the unpleasant details of the cases, and does not shun cases of sadism and torture. He states that he owes a debt to his father, an Urologist, for his lack of squeamishness when talking about sex and the body. He says he has "not glossed over the details, and have avoided euphemism, and at time my treatment may seem detached, if not callous." In spite of this, or maybe because of this, the author's style of writing is difficult to read, and gets dangerously close to being boring. Some of the more complex cases urgently need clearer analysis and revision.
As a final point, it should be said that there is nothing salacious or prurient about this book. The author is truly detached, if not callous in his approach. There is much information in this book, and this makes it valuable, particularly to the specialist academic, but it must have a very limited audience
Crazy
Very well-researched and helpful! It's difficult to find good history texts on this subject because so many of the legal records have been destroyed over the centuries. This book has been very helpful.