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by Christopher Bollas
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Psychology & Counseling
  • Author:
    Christopher Bollas
  • ISBN:
    080908533X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0809085330
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hill & Wang Pub; 1 edition (May 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Psychology & Counseling
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1643 kb
  • ePUB format
    1606 kb
  • DJVU format
    1401 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    440
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi mbr docx


Artists, intellectuals, and analysts alike, will find that Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience adds new depth and dimension to the creative process

It allows us to develop what the author calls a 'separate sense'. Artists, intellectuals, and analysts alike, will find that Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience adds new depth and dimension to the creative process. Over the past decade Christopher Bollas' writing has been striking for it's exploration into the workings of the unconscious, particularly the driving forces of creativity and it's opposite, destruction.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Being a Character, Christopher Bollas argued that Freud's vision of the dream process is a model for all unconscious mental experience. In this original and thought-provoking book, Bollas examines how people educate one another in the idioms of their unconscious lives and considers the nature and consequences of the traumas that inhibit the freedom to do this. It allows us to develop what the author calls a 'separate sense', which we use to assess the meanings of our own experiences and also to attune ourselves sympathetically to the lives of other people

oceedings{, title {Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience}, author {Christopher . Communications of the Unconscious.

oceedings{, title {Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience}, author {Christopher Bollas}, year {1995} }. Christopher Bollas. Preoccupation unto Death. The Functions of History. What Is This Thing Called Self? The Structure of Evil. Cracking Up. References.

In this book Bollas examines how people educate one another in the idioms . He is a member of ESGUT, the European Study Group of Unconscious Thought.

In this book Bollas examines how people educate one another in the idioms of their unconscious lives, and considers also the nature and consequences of the traumas which prevent us from doing this. More titles by Christopher Bollas.

In Being a Character, Christopher Bollas argued that Freud's vision of the dream process is a model for all .

Artists, intellectuals, and analysts alike, will find that Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience adds new depth and dimension to the creative process. The Work of Unconscious Experience.

Publications on the work of Christopher Bollas

Publications on the work of Christopher Bollas. Chapter 9 Cracking up. 135. Chapter 10 The structure of evil.

In this book, psychoanalyst Christopher Bollas extends his exploration of the inner world of human experience. In his last book, he argued that Freud's vision of the dream process is a model for all unconscious mental experience. Now he suggests that the rhythm of that experience - marked by everyday moments of psychic intensity, to which we respond first by breaking up the various factors that go into them (remembered, bodily, instinctual) and then by recombining them in a new understanding of ourselves - that this unconscious rhythm, fully engaged in, is vital to individual creativity and freedom. It develops what Bollas calls a separate sense, with which we assess the immeasurable, complex meanings of our own experience and become sympathetically attuned to the lives of other people.Bollas examines how people educate one another in the idioms of their unconscious lives, and he considers the nature and consequences of the traumas that inhibit the freedom to do this. He studies what we mean by the past - is it ominously unchangeable, or can history be a creative, open understanding of experience? We come to know who we are by giving form and meaning to our past, yet what do we mean when we speak of ourselves?

Andriodtargeted
Bollas is one of few contemporary English-language psychoanalytical authors, that still can be read. This is not a pathetic rosy syrop like the mainstream object-relations psychoanalysis. Bollas writes strightforwardly about the essential things to talk with the borderline and narcissistically deficient patients, i.e., about the Evil, hatred and death instinct.
X-MEN
Very clear and well writed, Expone advance theories in analysis and interpretation. And provoques interesanting ideas.
Worth while reading, in particular for the people interested in this field
Shan
Artists, intellectuals, and analysts alike, will find that Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience adds new depth and dimension to the creative process. Over the past decade Christopher Bollas' writing has been striking for it's exploration into the workings of the unconscious, particularly the driving forces of creativity and it's opposite, destruction. Bollas revisits Freud's notion of unconscious communication, tackling the difficult question: how can that which is unconscious and by definition unknowable, be conveyed and received within the conscious realm? He delves into the ways in which a `separate sense' of self is formed, the mysteries of the uncanny and the `unthought known.'
Bollas's original concept of `psychic genera,' which he distinguishes from psychic trauma, is integral to a psychoanalysis which derives from models of health as well as psychopathology. He posits that Freud's method of dream analysis -- association and interpretation -- may be used as a paradigm for understanding the intra-psychic processes which result in`unconscious freedom,' or the ability to creatively use objects and environment. The unconscious mechanism by which such `genera' are produced involves a necessary dialectic between condensation and dissemination in the taking in of data from the environment . . .
In addition, Bollas in Cracking Up, describes a psyche which, when overwhelmed by trauma, is restricted or `blanked out,' thus foreclosing the possibility of authentic self expression and vital object relationships. Bollas' descriptions of `psychic genera' and psychic trauma provide the clinician a new means of assessing diagnoses as well as a patient's capacity for psychoanalysis. His focused thinking renews the significance of the free-associative method and sheds new light on certain valuable clinical instruments such as: empathy, intuition, and unconscious communication in the therapeutic exchange.
Nenayally
Artists, intellectuals, and analysts alike, will find that Cracking Up: The Work of Unconscious Experience adds new depth and dimension to the creative process. Over the past decade Christopher Bollas' writing has been striking for it's exploration into the workings of the unconscious, particularly the driving forces of creativity and it's opposite, destruction. Bollas revisits Freud's notion of unconscious communication, tackling the difficult question: how can that which is unconscious and by definition unknowable, be conveyed and received within the conscious realm? He delves into the ways in which a `separate sense' of self is formed, the mysteries of the uncanny and the `unthought known.'
Bollas's original concept of `psychic genera,' which he distinguishes from psychic trauma, is integral to a psychoanalysis which derives from models of health as well as psychopathology. He posits that Freud's method of dream analysis -- association and interpretation -- may be used as a paradigm for understanding the intra-psychic processes which result in`unconscious freedom,' or the ability to creatively use objects and environment. The unconscious mechanism by which such `genera' are produced involves a necessary dialectic between condensation and dissemination in the taking in of data from the environment . . .
In addition, Bollas in Cracking Up, describes a psyche which, when overwhelmed by trauma, is restricted or `blanked out,' thus foreclosing the possibility of authentic self expression and vital object relationships. Bollas' descriptions of `psychic genera' and psychic trauma provide the clinician a new means of assessing diagnoses as well as a patient's capacity for psychoanalysis. His focused thinking renews the significance of the free-associative method and sheds new light on certain valuable clinical instruments such as: empathy, intuition, and unconscious communication in the therapeutic exchange.
Pipet
Good Product. Good Price. Good Service Great Book.