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by Jeffrey T. Coldren,John Colombo
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Psychology & Counseling
  • Author:
    Jeffrey T. Coldren,John Colombo
  • ISBN:
    0226113272
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226113272
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Of Chicago Press (October 1, 1994)
  • Pages:
    100 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Psychology & Counseling
  • Language:
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Nine-month-old infants' performance on ing problems was investigated in four experiments . In the first experiment, 48 infants were trained to fixate visually on a particular feature in a pair of stimuli that varied in color, form, and position dimensions

Nine-month-old infants' performance on ing problems was investigated in four experiments using the synchronous reinforcement paradigm. These experiments were organized around basic theoretical postulates concerning the relation between attention and learning. In the first experiment, 48 infants were trained to fixate visually on a particular feature in a pair of stimuli that varied in color, form, and position dimensions. Contingencies for responding were then shifted either within a dimension (reversal shift) or across dimensions (nonreversal shift).

Start by marking The Nature and Processes of Preverbal Learning . Moreover, the process of learning takes the form of hypothesis-testing and hence implies some type of internal mediation.

Start by marking The Nature and Processes of Preverbal Learning: Implications from Nine-Month-Old Infants' Discrimination Problem-Solving as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. In a sequence of carefully designed studies, the authors document infants' abilities to extract the relevant (. rewarded) attribute from complex arrays of color, shape, and texture. The evidence indictes that the infant's discrimination is based on abstracting the dimensions of the array, rather than learning to respond to a particular example.

Coldren, Jeffrey T; Colombo, John; Gholson, Barry. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). Discrimination learning, Child development. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

of Preverbal Learning : Implications from Nine Month-Old Infants' Discrimination Problem-Solving.

The Nature and Processes of Preverbal Learning : Implications from Nine Month-Old Infants' Discrimination Problem-Solving. by Jeffrey T. Coldren and John Colombo. Select Format: Paperback.

Jeffrey T. Coldren and John Colombo are the authors of The Nature and Process . The Nature and Processes Involved in Infants’ Learning. On the Development of the Processes Underlying Learning Across the Life Span. Jeffrey T. Coldren and John Colombo). Coldren and John Colombo are the authors of The Nature and Process of Preverbal Learning: Implications from Nine-Month-Old Infants' Discrimination Problem Solving, published by Wiley. Theoretical and Empirical Issues in the Study of Discrimination Learning. General Discussion: Implications for the Development of Attention and Learning.

Nine-month-old infants' performance on ing problems was investigated in four experiments using the synchronous reinforcement paradigm. Individual Differences in Infant Visual Attention: Four-Month-Olds' Discrimination and Generalization of Global and Local Stimulus Properties.

The nature and processes of preverbal learning: implications from nine-month-old infants' discrimination problem solving. Coldren, John Colombo. Toward a statistical theory of learning.

No. 4 The Nature and Processes of Preverbal Learning: Implications from Nine-Month-Old Infants' Discrimination Problem Solving 1994 pp. i-viii+1-94. No. 2/3 The Development of Emotion Regulation: Biological and Behavioral Considerations 1994 pp. i-viii+1-308.

Coldren JT, Colombo J (1994) The nature and process of preverbal learning: implications from nine-month-old infants’ discrimination problem solving. Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 59:1–75PubMedGoogle Scholar

Coldren JT, Colombo J (1994) The nature and process of preverbal learning: implications from nine-month-old infants’ discrimination problem solving. Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 59:1–75PubMedGoogle Scholar. Colenbrander A (2009) The functional classification of vision loss.

Infants learned the new suffix and used it to interpret novel affixed words that never occurred during the training. The nature and processes of preverbal learning: implications from nine-month-old infants' discrimination problem solving

Infants learned the new suffix and used it to interpret novel affixed words that never occurred during the training. These findings demonstrate that initial learning of sub-lexical functors and morphological alternations is frequency-based, without relying on word meaning. The nature and processes of preverbal learning: implications from nine-month-old infants' discrimination problem solving. Learning of syllable-object relations by preverbal infants: the role of temporal synchrony and syllable distinctiveness.

In a sequence of carefully designed studies, the authors document infants' abilities to extract the relevant (i.e. rewarded) attribute from complex arrays of color, shape, and texture. The evidence indictes that the infant's discrimination is based on abstracting the dimensions of the array, rather than learning to respond to a particular example. Moreover, the process of learning takes the form of hypothesis-testing and hence implies some type of internal mediation. Addressing an issue that has long been controversial (and whose history the authors summarize in a masterful fashion), this work has significant implications for understanding the nature of early learning.