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Download The Beethoven Factor: The New Positive Psychology of Hardiness, Happiness, Healing, and Hope fb2

by Paul Pearsall
Download The Beethoven Factor: The New Positive Psychology of Hardiness, Happiness, Healing, and Hope fb2
Mental Health
  • Author:
    Paul Pearsall
  • ISBN:
    1571743979
  • ISBN13:
    978-1571743978
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hampton Roads Publishing; First Edition edition (August 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mental Health
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1897 kb
  • ePUB format
    1131 kb
  • DJVU format
    1194 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    881
  • Formats:
    lrf doc lit txt


The Beethoven Factor book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Beethoven Factor book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Beethoven Factor: The New Positive Psychology of Hardiness, Happiness, Healing, and Hope as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The new, fast-emerging positive psychology movement is affirming the timeless wisdom of the philosophers by. .Pearsall explains that these thrivers have important lessons to teach us about the life-enhancing art of flourishing.

The new, fast-emerging positive psychology movement is affirming the timeless wisdom of the philosophers by showing that it is not stress itself preventing us from enjoying life, but our negative reaction to stress that does the damage. Positive psychology confirms that rather than shrinking from adversity, we must become engaged by it-and thrive through it-before we can savor all the sweetness life has to offer.

The Beethoven factor : the new positive psychology of hardiness, happiness, healing, and hope, Paul Pearsall. My brilliant son scott has been a model of hardiness by overcoming the ignorance and insensitivity he faced due to his cerebral palsy. lncludes bibliographical references and index. ISBN l-57174-397-9 (alk. paper) 1. Resilience (Personality trait) 2. Self-actualization (Psychology) I. Title. My son Roger has. shown resilient happiness through the stresses of his learning disabilities.

book by Paul Pearsall. True or false: Stress is good for you. Conventional wisdom insists that the statement is false, that stress is a thief robbing us of our ability to relax and enjoy life to its fullest. But for centuries, poets and philosophers have celebrated the ups and downs of life as the very essence of living, the spice that enables us to taste life fully. Dr. Paul Pearsall, bestselling author and a leading figure in the field of positive psychology, calls this proven phenomenon of converting stress into personal discovery and transformation Stress-Induced Growth, and says it is the essential element in unlocking your life's full potential.

Have Hope! Use Humor! See different ways of looking at situation! .

Have Hope! Use Humor! See different ways of looking at situation! 6 How Thrivers do it! Common Ways of Rising to the Occasion Let it Go Suffer Wisely & Cheer Up Have Faith, Calm Down & Do not Despair Lower Expectations Show Hardiness. 12 Hardiness Thriver’s have learned and trained their bodies to cope with stress! Innoculated themselves against distress Rise to a higher level of strength and coping when faced with adversity Learned to be tough!

The Beethoven Factor: The New Positive Psychology of Hardiness, Happiness, Healing, and Hope.

The Beethoven Factor: The New Positive Psychology of Hardiness, Happiness, Healing, and Hope. Educational psychologist Pearsall has written a book based on the 2000-year-old Polynesian concept of Aloha, embracing the five principles of patience, unity, agreement, humility, and kindness. In contrast to Western and Eastern principles glorifying the individual or self-enlightenment, the Aloha prescription glorifies the whole.

Pearsall is known for his work on positive psychology and is often citing the role of emotions such as hope and love . The Beethoven Factor: The New Positive Psychology of Hardiness, Happiness, Healing, and Hope, Hampton Roads Publishing Company, 2003.

Pearsall is known for his work on positive psychology and is often citing the role of emotions such as hope and love in surviving stress, depression and trauma. For instance, he introduced the notion of personal "strange attractors" drawn to each other to produce a bond that allows a couple to navigate life's obstacles. The Heart's Code: Tapping the Wisdom and Power of Our Heart Energy, Broadway Books, 1999, ISBN 978-0767900959.

PDF The recent emphasis on positive psychology is welcome, and has . The factors contributing to the enhancement of an individual’s hardiness in the situation of professional self-determination are considered.

The development of humanistic ideas brings the problem of health psychology to an existential level.

Pearsall illustrates Beethoven's life as the model thriver in Beethoven Factor because he represents the nature of the typical thriving response.

We have the ability to frame our experiences of life's unavoidable challenges with an attitude to convert stress into personal discovery and transformation. Pearsall illustrates Beethoven's life as the model thriver in Beethoven Factor because he represents the nature of the typical thriving response.

True or false: Stress is good for you.

Conventional wisdom insists that the statement is false, that stress is a thief robbing us of our ability to relax and enjoy life to its fullest. But for centuries, poets and philosophers have celebrated the ups and downs of life as the very essence of living, the spice that enables us to taste life fully.

So who's right? The new, fast-emerging positive psychology movement is affirming the timeless wisdom of the philosophers by showing that it is not stress itself preventing us from enjoying life, but our negative reaction to stress that does the damage. Positive psychology confirms that rather than shrinking from adversity, we must become engaged by it-and thrive through it-before we can savor all the sweetness life has to offer.

Dr. Paul Pearsall, bestselling author and a leading figure in the field of positive psychology, calls this proven phenomenon of converting stress into personal discovery and transformation Stress-Induced Growth, and says it is the essential element in unlocking your life's full potential. In The Beethoven Factor, Pearsall introduces you to the people he calls thrivers, individuals who face life's unavoidable challenges head-on and grow stronger and more vital as a result. Included are the amazing and inspiring stories of these so-called thrivers, including the composer Ludwig von Beethoven who wrote his best-loved symphonies despite total deafness, and the author himself who overcame Stage IV cancer.

Pearsall explains that these thrivers have important lessons to teach us about the life-enhancing art of flourishing. Though rare, thrivers are not unique; we all have the innate ability not only to weather life's tumults, but to become better than we ever were before. The Beethoven Factor gives you the tools to uncover your own "thriveability" and begin experiencing the richness, beauty, and true pleasure of living.


Zyangup
After hearing Dr. Pearsall at a conference in Kauai last year, I was so inspired by his keynote presentation that I immediately ordered "The Beethoven Factor" and "Toxic Success."

I began reading "The Beethoven Factor" as soon as I returned home. I devoured the first half, and found its philosophy exceptionally meaningful to me personally. That said, I never finished the book, putting it back on the shelf half read.

Pearsall began rambling and repeating, and my annoyance sent clear signals that I couldn't finish the book and thrive at the same time :-) Boredom drove me to another selection in my pile of "read this next" books.

Last week, I began reading "Toxic Success." That one's a horse of a different color. I'm nearly done with it, and must tell you that it is wonderful, exceeding my wildest expectations! Dr. Pearsall is truly brilliant, but I think his brain got stuck midway through Beethoven's Fifth!
AnnyMars
Pearsall is Hawaiian, and he combines insights from his native culture, his personal experience with extreme challenge, and the wisdom of the emerging field of Positive Psychology. He contends that we can choose and/or learn how to be "thrivers," i.e to move beyond victim or even recovery status, and experience "Stress Induced Growth". We can grow and be transformed through the pain and suffering of our lives.
He cites many examples from his interviews, of people who have indeed experienced what an outsider might call horrific experiences-- and shows how their unique perspective (which he assures us is learnable) has let them create a "good life" despite their problems.
Pearsall cites more scientific research that substantiates his position, so the reader who wants "hard data" can follow his references.
This is a useful and even inspiring contribution to the Positive Psychology literature -- I gave it a "4" because I wearied of Pearsall's frequent references to his own (significant) crisis experiences. IMHO, the point was made without repeating his personal credentials as a thriver every page or two.
Is it worth reading? Absolutely.
Dusar
Personally, I loved this book. After having experienced a major trauma in my own life, this book offered me a way of choosing how to deal with it in a way that was genuine and helped me thrive through it. I am so grateful to have found this book.
Celace
The author's key point is that we can consciously modify our explanatory system, construe meaning out of adversities and rise above them. I benefited from reading the book. However, it is not a well organized book. The author unnecessarily repeated himself multiple times. I spent quite some time reading through the book but often found same ideas scattered all over the book. I wish the author could organize his ideas more clearly and concisely.

In addition, the font is smaller than regular books, so it is not very comfortable to read. If the author didn't repeat himself multiple times, he should have been able to say what he wanted to say more concisely thus could use larger font.

The book is organized into two parts.

In part 1, the author described five phases of coping with crisis (worsening, victimizing, surviving, recovering, and thriving). Then he pointed out characteristics of thrivers. He also emphasized the difference between positive psychology and pathology based psychology. Moreover he described a curriculum for students studying "thriviology".

In part 2: the thriver's manual. The author discussed the four charactors of thrivers: hardiness, happiness, healing, and hope. In my opinion, the meat of the book is mainly between pg 130-230.
Nkeiy
I read this book, excited to hear someone talking about how pyschology can be used to study more than just dysfunction. However, as other reviewers have poited out, the author repeats himself unecessarily throughout the book. He also uses anecdotal evidence almost exclusively--which means most of his conclusions or platitudes with little impact.

The book Authentic Happines by Martin Seligman is a much better place to turn if you're interested in positive psychology.
Grotilar
I heard the author on the radio and bought the book. What makes this book unique is its attempt to dispute all of these "facts" about psychology and health in general. Alot of what is taken as fact by the health community is actually in dispute. If I had to sum up what I learned it would be: 1.Disease and evil exist for a reason in the world and these problems can be used for our benefit. 2. Our reaction to what happens to us is what determines happiness not how much we have compared to others. 3. Having the personality of a thriver will give you health benefits far in excess of traditional measures such as lowering your cholesterol or going to the gym. This book will really open your eyes and its filled with unforgettable stories.
Kesalard
A book full of cliches, with little original insight into the composer. Of course, it seems the author's intention really is not to study the composer's life. The way he renders Beethoven's personal dynamic is bested by three other authors: first, Maynard Solomons' classic BEETHOVEN; then J.W.N. Sullivan's great BEETHOVEN'S SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT; and more recently Carter J. Gregory's historico-fiction, MY ANGEL LEONORA. These are more inspired, but Pearsall is still worth it.

Todd Hermance
I expected a lot more profundity about this topic. There are much better works out there than this. The book is evidence that one cannot assume that because a writer has many books published that hey keep getting better, ofthen the revers as here where the audience in mind is simple people who find worn out bromides helpful. Try angel dust insted.