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by John M. Violanti,Douglas Paton
Download Who Gets Ptsd?: Issues of Posttraumatic Stress Vulnerability fb2
Mental Health
  • Author:
    John M. Violanti,Douglas Paton
  • ISBN:
    0398076189
  • ISBN13:
    978-0398076184
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Charles C Thomas Pub Ltd (January 11, 2006)
  • Pages:
    203 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mental Health
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1828 kb
  • ePUB format
    1675 kb
  • DJVU format
    1730 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    811
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf mbr lit


Persons engaged in occupations that . A key issue in the development of traumatic stress is vulnerability.

Persons engaged in occupations that require emergency responses must frequently deal with exposure to incidents that are traumatic  .

A key issue in the development of traumatic stress is vulnerability. Who Gets PTSD?: Issues of Posttraumatic Stress Vulnerability. 0398076197 (ISBN13: 9780398076191).

Cite this publication.

However, the psychological response to this exposure, even when examined in relation to a single incident, typically shows considerable variability (Paton & Violanti, 1996; Violanti, Paton & Dunning, 2000)  . Cite this publication. Charles Darwin University.

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Veterans’ Offspring’s Personality Traits and the Intergenerational Transmission of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms. Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 27, Issue.

Peng, Ann Chunyan Riolli, Laura T. Schaubroeck, John and Spain, Everett S. P. 2012. A moderated mediation test of personality, coping, and health among deployed soldiers. Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 33, Issue. Veterans’ Offspring’s Personality Traits and the Intergenerational Transmission of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms.

It is natural to feel afraid during and after a traumatic situation. Fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to help defend against danger or to avoid it. This fight-or-flight response is a typical reaction meant to protect a person from harm. Nearly everyone will experience a range of reactions after trauma, yet most people recover from initial symptoms naturally. Those who continue to experience problems may be diagnosed with PTSD

Symptoms may include disturbing thoughts, feelings, or dreams related to the events, mental or physical distress to trauma-related cues, attempts to avoid trauma-related cues, alterations in how a person thinks and feels, and an increase in the fight-or-flight response.

Who gets PTSD? Issues of posttraumatic stress vulnerability. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas. Authors and Affiliations. Volk, R. Steinbauer, J. Cantor, S. & Holzer, C. E. (1997).

Traumatic Stress in Police Officers: A Career-Length Assessment from Recruitment to Retirement Traumatic Stress in Police.

The objective of this book is to demonstrate how adopting a career perspective can provide a more comprehensive conceptualization of traumatic stress processes as they . The book examines the nature and effectiveness of the police role in dealing with adverse events as they unfold within a career perspective. Traumatic Stress in Police Officers: A Career-Length Assessment from Recruitment to Retirement Traumatic Stress in Police Officers: A Career-Length Assessment from Recruitment to Retirement, John M. Violanti. Издание: исправленное.

Persons engaged in occupations that require emergency responses must frequently deal with exposure to incidents that are traumatic. Some of these persons develop posttraumatic stress reactions or full-blown posttraumatic stress disorder, while others do not. A key issue in the development of traumatic stress is vulnerability. This book draws from research and life experiences on trauma vulnerability to better understand how mental health professionals and those concerned with the psychological well-being of others may disentangle the perplexing questions of who gets PTSD, why they do, and how we may prevent or minimize this from happening. Major topics in the text include: assessing psychological distress and physiological vulnerability in police officers; personal, organizational, and contextual influences in stress vulnerability; differences in vulnerability to posttraumatic deprivation; gender differences in police work stress and trauma; trauma types, frequency of exposure, and gender differences; personal, event, and organizational influences in police stress vulnerability; vulnerability, war, and prisoner abuse; reducing trauma through personal and response management; psychological vulnerability among international aid workers; prolonged separation and family vulnerability; risk communication and equilibrium theory; a statistical model for measuring trauma vulnerability; and traumatic stress in protective services professions. What is clear from the chapters that comprise this volume is that vulnerability should be conceptualized as a multilevel phenomenon, and the text identifies the contributing levels of analysis that provides the foundation for this process. The text will serve as a valuable resource to professionals in law enforcement, emergency and paramedical services, and the military, as well as to psychologists, psychiatrists, and counselors.

Olelifan
Though this book contains excellent information, it reads like a collection of studies that are very difficult reading. Recommended for advanced readers only, such as psychologists, and NOT for laymen such as the officers this book attempts to address.
Malarad
"Who Gets PTSD?" contains research by Violanti, Paton and others on why many police officers suffer full-blown PTSD and others do not. The book looks at trauma types, frequency of exposure, personal, event and organizational influences for keys. "From the moment the police officer enters police work, the socialization process molds him/her into depersonalized relationships and a myth of indestructibility. The effect of trauma, with its ensuing surge of emotions, devastates this myth."

Excellent advanced reading for instructors, peer officers and others involved in police mental health programs.

Andrew O'Hara, Badge of Life Program