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by Matt Brzycki
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Exercise & Fitness
  • Author:
    Matt Brzycki
  • ISBN:
    0844283177
  • ISBN13:
    978-0844283173
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (September 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Exercise & Fitness
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1890 kb
  • ePUB format
    1567 kb
  • DJVU format
    1409 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    497
  • Formats:
    doc mbr lit lrf


Maximizing Your Training is a collective effort of more than thirty leading experts in the strength and fitness field. Matt Brzycki has done an incredible job with this book. I definitely put on the "must-haves" for strength training alongside Stuart McRobert's books

Maximizing Your Training is a collective effort of more than thirty leading experts in the strength and fitness field. I definitely put on the "must-haves" for strength training alongside Stuart McRobert's books. Brzycki has done a great job in assembling top notch experts in the field of strength training. First, this is not a "Brzycki" book. Whether or not he trained under Matt Brzycki is irrelevant.

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Find nearly any book by Matt Brzycki. Matt Brzycki (Brzycki, Matt). used books, rare books and new books. Maximize Your Training: ISBN 9780844283173 (978-0-8442-8317-3) Softcover, McGraw-Hill, 1999. A Practical Approach to Strength Training. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Find all books by 'Matt Brzycki' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Matt Brzycki'. Cross Training for Fitness. ISBN 9781570281075 (978-1-57028-107-5) Softcover, Masters Pr, 1997. ISBN 9781935628132 (978-1-935628-13-2) Softcover, Blue River Press, 2012.

This is the book that I wish I'd had when I began my training" is a common opening sentiment expressed by many . This list, on the other hand, is the list of books I wish I'd had when I began training

This is the book that I wish I'd had when I began my training" is a common opening sentiment expressed by many authors of strength training books. This list, on the other hand, is the list of books I wish I'd had when I began training. It would have saved me a lot of time. The list contains the 100 best books for weightlifting.

Maximize Your Training By Matt Brzycki. Maximize Your Leadership by Shonn Keels (English) Paperback Book Free Shipping!

Maximize Your Training By Matt Brzycki.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Matt Brzycki books online. Maximize Your Training. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 21 of 21 results. Most popular Price, low to high Price, high to low Publication date, old to new Publication date, new to old. 19% off. Practical Approach to Strength Training.

Matt Brzycki, Coordinator of Health Fitness, Strength and Conditioning Programs at Princeton University . John Dunn Strength Coach, San Diego Chargers "A Practical Approach to Strength Training is an excellent book.

Matt Brzycki, Coordinator of Health Fitness, Strength and Conditioning Programs at Princeton University, examines all aspects of strength training-including specificity, high intensity training, explosive training and plyometrics, and offers advice on how to organize individual and group strength training programs.

Specifically, the book outlines how to increase a young athlete's .

Specifically, the book outlines how to increase a young athlete's coordination, flexibility, speed, endurance, and strength, thereby enabling them to excel in sports. Maximize Your Training : Insights from Top Strength and Fitness Professionals by Matt Brzycki (1999, Paperback). Б/у: 270,71 RUB. A Practical Approach to Strength Training by Matt Brzycki (1998, Paperback, Revised).

Matt Brzycki, Coordinator of Health Fitness, Strength and Conditionin. This book features chapters on the following: strength training, injury trends in wrestling, protecting the knee, protecting the shoulder, rehabilitative strength training, the importance o. More). 4. 7. View PDF. Cite. Accept the challenge.

Maximizing Your Training is a collective effort of more than thirty leading experts in the strength and fitness field. These respected professionals share their insights on a variety of topics and issues related to training and exercise, including: The history of strength training Program design High intensity training (HIT) Motivation Strength training for specific populations (including women, older adults, and prepubescents) Bodybuilding Powerlifting Flexibility Nutrition Steroids Maximize Your Training is for fitness enthusiasts who want to gain the knowledge, understanding, and insight necessary to achieve a competitive edge. This book is an important tool for anyone who takes bodybuilding seriously. Matt Brzycki is the coodinator of health fitness, strength and conditioning at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. He has authored more than 175 articles that have been featured in 33 different publications and has written three books—A Practical Approach to Strength Training, Your Strength and Conditioning, and Cross Training for Fitness—and coauthored Conditioning for Basketball with Shaun Brown, the strength and conditioning coach of the Boston Celtics.

terostr
From reading some of the reviews all I can think of saying is this "Did you read it or is it your Ego speaking?" This us and them mentality is pure stupid. This is a very good book and is backed with a bunch of non biased research (Rare in Strength and Conditioning) Just looking at the credentials of the ones bashing it tells the whole story for anyone that has been paying attention. If you are interested in different ways to apply High Intensity Training to your program, this is for you. If your not interested then why waste your time? AND you shouldn't be rating the book if you haven't read it.
Nanecele
This book is a great resource for those interested in the science and philosophy behind HIT (High Intensity Training).

I especially enjoyed the individual chapters written by Tom Kelso and Ralph Carpinelli which I thought presented the most cogent explanations of why and how to employ HIT workouts.

At the "used" prices the book is being offered for it's not only well worth the read, it's a steal!
Jazu
Things you don't know if you've never had a trainer!
Ynonno
I like how it's a collection of articles by a bunch of different guys. They're basically a bunch of cheerleaders for HIT training though. If, like most lifters, you've found HIT to be completely ineffective this may not be the book for you.
Madis
... I felt I knew most of what was written here from before. The book would have been great if it had been one of the first books I had read in the field, and there were a few articles that went in-depth that were just excellent. The argument pro one set per exercise was very convincing, as was the case for infrequent traing. And many good rule-of-thumb guidelines were to be found in the different articles. But there were some articles that honestly seemed a bit uninspired, which the book would have been better off without.
All in all a good book, but not one you'd buy unless you're a training books maniac or are trying to orient yourself in the field of training for the first time.
Binthars
Matt Brzycki has done an incredible job with this book. I definitely put on the "must-haves" for strength training alongside Stuart McRobert's books.

Brzycki has done a great job in assembling top notch experts in the field of strength training. I read the negative review from Cruickshank and have to highly disagree. First, this is not a "Brzycki" book. Whether or not he trained under Matt Brzycki is irrelevant. This book is not a collection of Matt's ideas/approaches. It's compilation from a wide variety of authors, including Dr. Ken Leistner (Powerlifting guru), Jan Dellinger (nobody knows iron history better that I've seen), Ken Mannie and Dr. Ted Lambrinides - and that's just a few of the authors. So the reviewer's experiences with Matt Brzycki - whatever they were - are completely irrelevant to appraising this book.

To be completely honest I didn't like every single chapter. But that's okay. Every chapter has a different author's perspective on different training issues/methods. There are many different ways to do things. But their underlying philosophy of "train, hard, briefly and infrequently" has been proven successful going back a century (do some research on how the old time bodybuilders of the 20s-50s trained before the advent of steroids).

There is stuff in this book you simply CANNOT find in any other book that I've ever seen, like Bill Piche's chapter on Powerlifting HIT. I think it's very useful for any trainee - powerlifter or not - to learn some of those exercises like ball squats and trap bar deadlifts. This guy has certainly been in the trenches too - he's noted as having deadlifted 600lbs at a 198lb bw without the use of steroids.

This book covers the whole gamut of strength training, with one notable exception - detailed descriptions of the most productive strength training exercises. That's the one thing that's missing with this book. However, given the huge size of this book - it's virtually an encylopaedia with over 400 pages - this is understandable. The editor has published another book - "A Practical Approach to Strength Training - that describes in detail many exercises. I'd also recommend Stuart McRobert's book on exercise technique as well.

There isn't any nonsense in this book about miracle supplements or "secret" routines that are pushed every month by the unscrupulous muscle magazines. This book tells you all you need to know about strength training (again, with that one exception of exercise description).

My feeling is that there is just too much junk out there in terms of training advice. The best advice I can give to the trainee is to just read a very small number of books - this being one of them - and never EVER read another muscle magazine. Training really isn't that complicated, despite what some con artists will have you believe.

Good luck with your training!
Amhirishes
I'll try and avoid all the dogmatic HIT vs. non-HIT stuff that is seeping into other folks' reviews and just address the stuff in the book.
Some of the information is good, some not so good. Some of the articles are interesting, some are a bit technical and drawn out.
The bottom line is this: take any strength training book written and sift it through your BS filter. Try the stuff written in it. Keep what works and throw away the rest. But also realize that what works for you may not work for somebody else.
Anyway, my point is that there's a lot of good information in this book and it's a worthy addition to any lifter's library.