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by Lucia Perillo
Download I've Heard the Vultures Singing: Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature fb2
Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Author:
    Lucia Perillo
  • ISBN:
    1595340319
  • ISBN13:
    978-1595340313
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Trinity University Press (May 24, 2007)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1127 kb
  • ePUB format
    1996 kb
  • DJVU format
    1649 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    774
  • Formats:
    rtf azw mobi mbr


Foolishly, then, I leave this record of my recent years, of my life indoors and out.

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Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade Mountains alone and prided herself on daring solo skis . has been added to your Cart.

Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade Mountains alone and prided herself on daring solo skis down the wild slopes of Mount Rainier has been added to your Cart.

Thus I’ve Heard the Vultures Singing opens with Perillo’s observations of. .

Thus I’ve Heard the Vultures Singing opens with Perillo’s observations of that most reviled and overlooked bird: the seagull. As Perillo learns to see seagulls, so does the reader. Wilderness can be found in unexpected places, even odd-smelling, trash-ridden, muddy docks. The eclectic nature of the book means there is at least a little bit here for everyone, from nature lover to poetry enthusiast. But the breadth of topics may also put off some readers who prefer a more focused read.

Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade .

Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade Mountains alone and prided herself on daring solo skis down the wild slopes of Mount Rainier, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was in her thirties. I've Heard the Vultures Singing is a clear-eyed and brazenly outspoken examination of her life as a person with disabilities.

I've Heard the Vultures Singing. 206 printed pages Masterfully written, the essays resonate with lovers of literature and nature. Acclaimed poet and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, Lucia Perillo, a former park ranger who loved to hike the Cascade Mountains alone and prided herself on daring solo skis down the wild slopes of Mount Rainier, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was in her thirties. Masterfully written, the essays resonate with lovers of literature and nature, and with anyone who has dealt with disadvantages of the body or the hard-luck limitations of ordinary life. Biographies Lifestyle & Sports Memoirs.

The poetry of Lucia Perillo is fierce, tragicomic, and contrarian, with subjects ranging from coyotes and Scotch broom . Her critically acclaimed memoir, I’ve Heard the Vultures Singing: Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature, was published in 2007.

The poetry of Lucia Perillo is fierce, tragicomic, and contrarian, with subjects ranging from coyotes and Scotch broom to local elections and family history. Formally braided, Perillo gathers strands of the mythic and mundane, of media and daily life, as she faces the treachery of illness and draws readers into poems rich in image and story.

Lucia Perillo, Whose Illness Shaped Her Poetry, Dies at 58", The New York Times . I've Heard the Vultures Singing. San Antonio: Trinity University

Lucia Perillo, Whose Illness Shaped Her Poetry, Dies at 58", The New York Times, October 25, 2016. Lucia Maria Perillo was born on Sept. 30, 1958, in Manhattan and grew up in suburban Irvington, . San Antonio: Trinity University. "Copper Canyon Press: On the Spectrum of Possible Deaths, poetry by Lucia Perillo". Lucia Perillo is a young poet whose signature voice is marked by an urban speed and a narrative style driven by characterization and drama. Copper Canyon Press. John Williams (January 14, 2012).

In I've Heard the Vultures Singing, Perillo confronts, in stark but funny terms, the ironies of being someone with her .

In I've Heard the Vultures Singing, Perillo confronts, in stark but funny terms, the ironies of being someone with her history and gusto for life being suddenly unable to walk. "Ground-truthing" is what biologists call entering an environment and surveying what is there via the senses of sight and sound. These essays explore what it’s like to experience desire as a sick person, how to lower one’s expectations just enough for a wilderness experience, and how to navigate the vagaries of a disease that has no predictable trajectory

I've Heard the Vultures Singing: Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature

I've Heard the Vultures Singing: Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature

During her days as a park ranger, Lucia Perillo loved nothing more than to brave the Cascade Mountains alone, taking special pride in her daring solo skis down the raw, unpatrolled slopes of Mount Rainier. Then, in her thirties, she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. In I've Heard the Vultures Singing, Perillo confronts, in stark but funny terms, the ironies of being someone with her history and gusto for life being suddenly unable to walk. ("Ground-truthing" is what biologists call entering an environment and surveying what is there via the senses of sight and sound.) These essays explore what it’s like to experience desire as a sick person, how to lower one’s expectations just enough for a wilderness experience, and how to navigate the vagaries of a disease that has no predictable trajectory. I've Heard the Vultures Singing records in unflinching, honest prose one woman’s struggle to find her place in a difficult new world.

Llanonte
A sad story of one woman's battle with MS. She did a great job of showing how debilitating MS is and what the loss of mobility meant to her. I skipped over some of the info about poetry. Ms. Perillo was a well-known poet and it was an important part of her life.
happy light
I read everything Lucia writes and am never dissapointed. Both her poetry and prose flow beautifully on the page like a spring stream. Her deep insights on life form a back-eddy that will keep your brain swirling in thought for days after. Because of common interests and experiences: Buddhism, birds, east-coast Italian childhood, former park ranger, western-Washington state resident, etc., I delight in reading her take in these similar areas. Perillo always has unique and facinating insights that make me want to slap my forehead and go, "why didn't I think of that."
This book like her others is both tragic and funny. Maybe a little more sad because of the progression of the disease. Her husband Jim, who is mentioned several times in the book is a comic inspiration; not only because of his dedication, but his comic wit removes the chance of too much sentimentality.
I would recommend this book to anyone who appreciates good, thought-evoking prose and especially if you have a medical condition where your body is changing and moving toward its final end - well, I guess that's all of us.
Ziena
I got a disease from a statin drug--similar to MS. Like Ms Perillo, I was very outdoorsy and athletic.
Statinvictims.com
Samugul
Beautiful, harsh, honest. As someone with chronic pain, this memoir has been invaluable to me.
Mildorah
In really appreciate this book and haven't read it all yet.
Clever
Very inspiring
Agalen
For Lucia Perillo, who spent a great deal of her life as a park ranger, nature is so essential to her identity that a complete withdrawal from it would equal death. I Hear the Vultures Singing is a memoir of a forced retreat from the wilderness and the gradual surrender of a familiar self, as multiple sclerosis inflicts its damage. Where the subject of affliction and mortality is concerned, I have come to expect the naturalist-minded to respond with the most surprising--and often upbeat--conclusions. A biologist by training and a poet by calling, Perillo writes with both candor and humor, as well as with the insatiable curiosity for the natural world often cultivated by people who choose to spend the majority of their time outside of human company. The day after she is informed of her diagnosis, Perillo goes skiing on Mt. Rainier, alone, on dangerous snow, in avalanche conditions. She drives home, she says, "feeling a little disappointed about not being dead." "That last sentence," she continues, "Include[s] the kind of sentiment... that comes off as antisocial, living as we do in an age that mandates soldiering onward in the face of illness....But to resist enlisting as a brave soldier in the battle against one's illness--to choose instead burial by avalanche!--seems
to me to be a typically human and honest response."
It used to be one could recommend only three books that dealt with the complexities of multiple sclerosis in a manner both truthful and stylish: Diary of a Disappointed Man by W.N.P. Barbellion, Baroque 'n' Roll by Brigid Brophy and Lost Property by Ben Sonnenberg. Now I've Heard the Vultures Singing must be added to the list. Like Barbellion, Lucia Perillo is a gifted naturalist; like Brophy, a wit; like Sonnenberg, an ironist. More important, Ms Perillo is an accomplished poet. She commands a variety of voices: slangy, sexy, sublime. All of them are on show in this book of prose which is, in equal measure, hilarious and poignant.