» » The Pathological Protein: Mad Cow, Chronic Wasting, and Other Deadly Prion Diseases

Download The Pathological Protein: Mad Cow, Chronic Wasting, and Other Deadly Prion Diseases fb2

by Philip Yam
Download The Pathological Protein: Mad Cow, Chronic Wasting, and Other Deadly Prion Diseases fb2
Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Author:
    Philip Yam
  • ISBN:
    0387955089
  • ISBN13:
    978-0387955087
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Copernicus; 2003 edition (April 30, 2003)
  • Pages:
    286 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1882 kb
  • ePUB format
    1324 kb
  • DJVU format
    1442 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    958
  • Formats:
    txt mbr azw lrf


Philip Yam’s book, ‘The Pathological Protein’, does an admirable job of exploring them. The author takes you through a thorough exploration of the threats of mad cow and other related diseases. You may never look at beef the same way again.

Philip Yam’s book, ‘The Pathological Protein’, does an admirable job of exploring them. is full of such sensible observations, a welcome novelty in discussions on this fraught topic. The author is particularly good at explaining the complex and controversial science behind TSEs, as well as the prospects for better diagnosis and treatmen. .The Economist –online, March, 2004).

Philip Yam’s book, ‘The Pathological Protein’, does an admirable job of exploring them

Philip Yam’s book, ‘The Pathological Protein’, does an admirable job of exploring them.

understanding of the pathologic basis of disease through completely updated coverage, including the lates.

Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. understanding of the pathologic basis of disease through completely updated coverage, including the lates. How to Write a Better Thesis. 84 MB·218,141 Downloads.

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In this book, Philip Yam describes the history of the scientific effort to track down and understand the prion, and the medical effort, still underway, to devise treatments for those who suffer from its ravages.

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book by Philip Yam. Prions are an entirely new class of pathogens, and scientists are just beginning to understand them

Prions are an entirely new class of pathogens, and scientists are just beginning to understand them.

Prions are an entirely new class of pathogens, and scientists are just beginning to understand them.

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Prions are an entirely new class of pathogens, and scientists are just beginning to understand them. Although theyhave plagued humans and animals for 3 centuries,only in the last 2 decades have researchers linked them to diseases like Mad Cow. This book tells the strange story of their discovery, and the medical controversies that swirl around them. The author, Philip Yam, is a well-respected and connected journalist who is now an editor at Scientific American.


Shadowredeemer
Although not particularly detailed medically, the information in this book is interesting and adds information on the types and results of various prions.
Malien
I found this book a great read on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Definitely recommend it if you are interested on this topic.
Risky Strong Dromedary
Good
Goldcrusher
Excellent, if somewhat technical, compendium.
Juce
An easy read even for people without a scientific background. The author takes you through a thorough exploration of the threats of mad cow and other related diseases. You may never look at beef the same way again.
Nto
I bought this book because I was writing a term paper about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), and I want to get a general overview of their implications. Well, this book did an excellent job of doing just that. I wouldn't recommend citing this work if you're writing a scientific paper, but it's definitely worth reading. There's a huge amount of background information in the introduction chapters, but you can probably skip this if you've taken a few college-level biology classes. I also didn't bother reading the chapters about TSEs affecting deer and elk. I really couldn't care less about some decrepit, senile deer running around aimlessly in a forest preserve. Anyways, this book is great because it explains how Mad Cow Disease started and how it was transmitted to humans. And it mentions how brain-eating cannibals from Papua New Guinea contracted kuru. Who wouldn't be interested in that? These kuru victims are the closest thing to zombies that have ever and will ever exist. Enjoy learning about prions! (They're by far my favorite pathogens!)
Llanonte
Smooth transition. Timely shipping. Satisfied.
Interesting book well put together easy to read
While the book begins with a nicely written human interest story, this work concentrates on the science, and the picture is somewhat muddled even today. For one thing, the prion protein has deep evolutionary roots, which should mean it is critical to life, yet genetically engineered mice without prion proteins seem to thrive. The protein is involved in copper utilization but there are biological alternatives in place. There are still a few respectable scientists who are skeptical about the prion infection theory, and Yam points out one piece of definitive evidence is lacking: the ability to create a misshapen prion protein which is conclusively free of any possible viral contamination, and use it to infect an organism. If there is an infectious virus, it would have to be very small and rather unique. There are several hereditary forms of prion disease each of which involves a slightly different mutation of the gene; the disease can have sporadic (randomly occurring) as well as hereditary and infectious (mad cow disease) causes. Only humans with certain alleles of the prion gene are susceptible to mad cow, but 37% of Caucasians, for example, have that allele. No one knows why mad cow disease hasn't clustered more in particular families or regions. Use of human based biologicals in repairing wounds was a prime cause of disease transmission at one time, and we think the blood supply is probably safe primarily because if it weren't, there would be more cases (although the Red Cross does try to screen out potential carriers).

Yam does a good job in emphasizing and explaining the important scientific issues. He also involves the reader in the mysteries as they historically unfolded. Occasionally, he enumerates very detailed findings in a chronological manner when a more enlightening approach could have been used.