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by Cristy Shauck,Marie McClendon
Download The Healthy Lunchbox: How To Plan, Prepare & Pack Unique Meals Kids Will Love fb2
Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Author:
    Cristy Shauck,Marie McClendon
  • ISBN:
    1580402402
  • ISBN13:
    978-1580402408
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    American Diabetes Association (December 7, 2005)
  • Pages:
    124 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1579 kb
  • ePUB format
    1997 kb
  • DJVU format
    1191 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    911
  • Formats:
    lrf azw rtf docx


The Healthy Lunchbox book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Healthy Lunchbox book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Healthy Lunchbox: How To Plan, Prepare & Pack Unique Meals Kids Will Love as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Healthy Lunchbox : How to Plan, Prepare and Pack Stress-Free Meals Kids Will Love.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -138) and index. Personal Name: Shauck, Cristy. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Rubrics: Lunchbox cooking Children Nutrition. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

The back of the book focuses on healthy lunchbox meals; recipes for . This book helps you understand how to get your kids to want to eat right without nagging.

The back of the book focuses on healthy lunchbox meals; recipes for breakfast, snacks and lunch are generally simple and appealing, and they employ some wholesome packaged products for convenience. I loved this book! It has been a great resource for me as a professional and as a mother of three growing children. The "action plans" at the end of each chapter are a lot of fun for kids and parents, and you'll probably end up some of the activities family routines and traditions.

How to lunch like a pilot Pack a lunchbox to help maintain concentration and brain power during the . Discover a BBC Good Food Show near you. Book tickets now. On TV.

How to lunch like a pilot. Pilots require energy, high concentration levels and a stress-reducing diet. Learn about the best things to pack in a lunchbox to tick all the right boxes. How to lunch like a teacher. Pack a lunchbox to help maintain concentration and brain power during the school day. Take a look. See your favourite chefs on Sky Channel 133, BT 313 and find their recipes at goodfoodchannel.

Marie McClendon is an alias of Maria Forrest. The Healthy Lunchbox: How To Plan, Prepare & Pack Unique Meals Kids Will Love by Marie McClendon. The Healthy Lunchbox: How to Plan, Prepare & Pack Stress-Free Meals Kids Will Love by Marie McClendon, MEd, and Cristy Shauck: front cover. The Healthy Lunchbox: How to Plan, Prepare & Pack Stress-Free Meals Kids Will Love by Marie McClendon, MEd, and Cristy Shauck: back cover.

for Kids) (Free Animal Coloring Pictures for Kids)" PDF file. Sav e eBo o k . H elp !

The Healthy Lunchbox: How To Plan, Prepare & Pack Unique Meals Kids Will Love by Marie McClendon, Cristy Shauck. by Marie McClendon (Dec 8, 0005). An Address By John A. Shauck.

The Healthy Lunchbox: How To Plan, Prepare & Pack Unique Meals Kids Will Love by Marie McClendon, Cristy Shauck. by John Allen Shauck (Sep 30, 2011). The Swiss Shauck-Shock family in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio by Elizabeth Lockwood Coombs (1980).

Dozens of easy menus and tips to help you give your children healthy lunch-on-the-go alternatives

This upbeat guide is full of healthy alternatives to junk food–laden lunches. Drawing on her years of experience as both an educator and a mother, Marie McLendon has created a book loaded with recipes, menus, tips, and suggestions. This resource rescues you from the mundane and stressful task of figuring out how to pack a healthy lunch that your kids will actually eat.


Rich Vulture
This was a great book to inspire me as my eldest starts Kindergarten. I want to make his lunch, as school lunches these days are often less than nutritious. The book had lots of good recipe ideas, many I will be trying (some with adjustments), and some great tips for planning and packing lunches.

My reservations are: a pervasive theme in the book is recipes that call for "low-fat" or "fat-free" ingredients, or use "tub margarine, melted", or use strictly egg whites, you get the idea. I do not normally consider those foods healthy for children. Children need healthy fats, and a lack thereof has been shown to cause cravings that are often satiated by the easy to find, terribly unhealthy, trans-fats. Skip the processed fat-free stuff, just use real food. 2% or Whole milk and yogurt are best for kids not battling certain serious health issues. And why use margarine (which often has unhealthy fats and oils), when it needs to be melted into it's oil form anyway? Use real butter, or a healthy oil, such as olive, coconut, canola, etc., depending on the recipe. And why are we keeping egg yolks from our kids? The nutrients in them cannot be replaced elsewhere, and I'm not aware of a trend toward high cholesterol among normal children.

But my biggest concern is the lack of whole grains. Oats are used, and some whole wheat is included, but plain white flour seems to be the dominant player. In one recipe, a lentil tortellini dish, the authors note that because it contains lentils and (plain white) tortelini pasta, it contains complete proteins. Last I checked, complete proteins required a legume and a *whole* grain, except in certain specific cases.

There are many notes for diabetics and those avoiding gluten (which I think is great!), but in a number of cases the adaptations of the recipes are distracting and confusing for those of us not avoiding those items. They do not always explain how to make them if you are NOT avoiding those foods (I mean, we are all avoiding too much sugar, but I am very picky about what sweeteners I'm willing to substitute, usually I just use less, but raw, sugar and my kids are fine with that).

In an effort to make these lunches über-healthy, the authors have missed the mark a bit. To make healthy meals, we all need to use more whole foods, including whole grains, more fruits and vegetables, reduce our intake of processed foods and refined grains, and reduce the sugar overall (which is often increased in foods with low- and no-fats foods to keep the flavor). Think REAL FOOD! A parent who is thoughtful about these issues will figure out the adjustments and substitute accordingly, but I think the authors could have had a discussion about their recommendations for low-fat, sugar substitutes, flour substitutes, etc, etc., early in the book, and kept recipe ingredients to "1c. yogurt", etc. As it is, recipes seem to be written for the diabetic, celiac child, with serious weight issues, which is a bit distracting.

*BOTTOM LINE - Decide what your own child needs to be healthy, and adjust the recipes, please. Be careful of avoiding healthy whole foods! Think REAL FOOD!*

That said, for a mom who couldn't think of much to make beyond PB&J, it has many good ideas for planning and packing lunches and the recipes are a good starting point. Adjust them, and search the web to expand in areas that the book is light on (I would have like more whole-grain salads, among other things).
Rainshaper
This book was great in that it helped me to think outside the box for packing my son's lunches for school. It doesn't have to be a sandwich, carrots & fruit. My son is a very picky eater and now I feel like I have a good amount of options to make for some variety. I also found how to better involve him, which I'm hoping will increase the odds he will eat what is packed. Some of the recipes in the back were great, but I'm not too sure yet about others. I won't knock'em till I try them though. The book was a very easy and enjoyable read and I would recommend this book to anyone.
Weernis
I didn't find much new here. If you've read any other lunchbox packing books and have even a little knowledge of nutrition, don't bother with this book.
Kit
It had some good ideas, but not nearly as useful as I thought it would be. I think I used it a few times but now it just sit on my bookshelf.
Kefrannan
This book is great. Easy, simple ideas to improve the quality of lunch.
Don't be stuck in a rut when it comes to lunch for your kids. Read and use this book instead!
Braswyn
I just want the different options to pack the lunch box. In this book you read and read but where are the options?
interactive man
The Healthy Lunchbox provides a solid basis for parents to provide their children with healthy lunches that pack up quickly and easily.

The book is divided into four parts: Part One, "Get Ready!", outlines the nutrional needs of kids; Part Two, "Get Set!", helps parents with the logistics of packing lunches (how to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold, menu suggestions, ideas on how to get your children to eat what you pack, not trade it away, alternatives to junk food, etc.); Part Three, "Go!", where all the recipes are housed; and Part Four, "More Food for Thought," where the authors give parents further resources.

I read the first two parts (after looking at all the recipes!) and the information was solid and written in a conversational tone. My reason for buying the book, of course, was the recipes and I was not disappointed. There was a wide variety of foods (from your standard english muffin pizza to japanese style california rolls) presented under three headings: Sandwiches, Salads, Soups, Casseroles, and Other Main Dishes; Fruit and Veggie Side Dishes and Snacks; and Snacks and Desserts. As promised, the recipes are quick and easy, and each has its own nutrional index covering calories, total fat (further broken down into saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat and monunsaturated fat), cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates (further broken down into dietary fiber and sugars), protein, and exchanges. Serving size, total servings, prep time and cook time are also included. Indeed, this book is very comprehensive.

Additionally, the recipes in this book can appeal to adults and children alike, so that weekend lunches and adult lunchboxes can benefit, too. My particular favorite is the Turkey Lurkey Jerky - it's easy (although time-intensive) and tasty and now I can make my husband's favorite snack without any preservatives or other nasties. In fact, the first batch I made was eaten the same day (much to my chagrin)! This recipe alone was worth the cost of the book to me!
I have an ADHD nephew who won't eat anything but pizza (no sauce), chicken nuggets (no strips), sugary cereal, (no milk) and any thing with sugar or icing. This book has given us ideas to correct his diet.