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by Lisa Himmel,Sheila Himmel
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Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Author:
    Lisa Himmel,Sheila Himmel
  • ISBN:
    0425227901
  • ISBN13:
    978-0425227909
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Berkley; Original edition (August 4, 2009)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Diseases & Physical Ailments
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1412 kb
  • ePUB format
    1657 kb
  • DJVU format
    1762 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    974
  • Formats:
    lit azw docx txt


Sheila and Lisa Himmel put on paper-with rare vulnerability, wit, and courage- what millions of American mothers and daughters face privately, but fear speaking about in public.

Sheila and Lisa Himmel put on paper-with rare vulnerability, wit, and courage- what millions of American mothers and daughters face privately, but fear speaking about in public. Perhaps most admirable, blame is never a weapon in this extremely personal memoir.

Hungry: A Mother and Daughter Fight Anorexia is a 2009 book cowritten by Sheila Himmel and Lisa Himmel. Written by a daughter and her mother, Hungry depicts Lisa Himmel's struggle with anorexia and bulimia

Hungry: A Mother and Daughter Fight Anorexia is a 2009 book cowritten by Sheila Himmel and Lisa Himmel. Written by a daughter and her mother, Hungry depicts Lisa Himmel's struggle with anorexia and bulimia. Published by Berkley Trade, Hungry took six years to be completed because of Lisa's relapses. Lisa Himmel was born to Ned and Sheila Himmel in 1984. When she was in grade school, Lisa was jealous of her classmate's candy.

Sheila Himmel, mother and writer used to love "irony". It made for the best stories. Sheila was the food critic for the San Jose Mercury Newspaper for many years. and enjoyed culinary adventure. at age 14 something was happening to Lisa. She flipped back and forth between anorexia and bulimia. It's an engrossing look at the power of food and eating

Pure+Simple Essentials. HUNGRY: A Mother and Daughter Fight Anorexia.

Pure+Simple Essentials. 13 August 2009 ·. check out the video of our appearance on View From the Bay. abclocal. Health: A mother/daughter struggle with anorexia - 8/10/09 - San Francisco News - abc7news.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 7. 7% restored. Главная Hungry: A Mother and Daughter Fight Anorexia. Sheila Himmel, Lisa Himmel.

Before Sheila fully grasped what was happening, her fourteen-year-old with a thirst for life and a palate for the flavors of Vietnam and Afghanistan was replaced by a weight-obsessed, antisocial, hundredpound nineteen-year-old.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 358 Kb. Himmel Sheila, Himmel Lisa. 359 Kb.

Author: Himmel Sheila Himmel Lisa. A mother-daughter twosome.

Lisa Himmel is a graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz with a degree in American studies. She is the coauthor, with her mother, Sheila Himmel, of Hungry: A Mother and Daugher Fight Anorexia. She plans to work in early childhood education.

A unique eating-disorder memoir written by a mother and daughter. Unbeknownst to food critic Sheila Himmel-as she reviewed exotic cuisines from bistro to brasserie- her daughter, Lisa, was at home starving herself. Before Sheila fully grasped what was happening, her fourteen-year-old with a thirst for life and a palate for the flavors of Vietnam and Afghanistan was replaced by a weight-obsessed, antisocial, hundredpound nineteen-year-old. From anorexia to bulimia and back again-many times-the Himmels feared for Lisa's life as her disorder took its toll on her physical and emotional well-being. Hungry is the first memoir to connect eating disorders with a food-obsessed culture in a very personal way, following the stumbles, the heartbreaks, and even the funny moments as a mother-daughter relationship-and an entire family-struggles toward healing.

Goltikree
This memoir is one of the better ones, but like all ED focused books, it can be painful to read. I was grateful to avoid the typical “here’s a running list of what I ate (or didn’t eat) today” that some of the literature becomes (Brittany Burgunder’s memoir for one). I also appreciated reading this from the mom’s perspective.

However, Sheila, the Mom and primary author, has her own eating issues that are almost painful to read in context with her daughter going through a life threatening illness. She unflinchingly discusses the choices, good and bad, that she made as a parent and the desperate attempts to find treatment that works.

Lisa, the daughter and protagonist, is almost left out amidst the thoughts and actions of her parents. Like all other memoirs around ED, the “story” ends abruptly with Lisa herself still unsure of her ability to stay healthy, who still has significant eating issues. She would now be in her mid-20’s, and I can’t help but wonder how many times she’s relapses since this was published.

Good read, would recommend, although the ending was in my opinion, a waste with lists of do’s and don’ts that are much too simplified to mesh well with the rest of the book.
Getaianne
Hungry is heartbreaking, funny, and hard to put down. It's a wonder to have a book on the troubles that beset families (the kind of books so many parents pick up, whether or not our children have the particular issues dealt with in the book -- here it's extreme eating disorders)that is so well written. The mother involved is an award-winning journalist, and it shows.
If you happen to live with someone with eating disorders, you will take away a tremendous amount of insight and useful information. If you don't, you will be enlightened on the topic and also be moved by this inter-generational story of child-rearing, professional ambition, and the love and hate of food.
Highly recommended.
Thetahuginn
Well written,heart felt, encouraging. I loved that the author stayed strong and didn’t give up and seemed to keep a sense of humor throughout.
Thordibandis
Eating disorders are a major problem as I have dealt with several in my experience in counseling teenagers. It is sad and difficult to understand why young woman do this to themselves -- but we live in a world that promotes the "model" figure and the obsession to diet. This book, "Hungry", was extremely interesting and warmed my heart to see a mother and her daughter grow closer together as they dealt with the problem. If you do know someone with an eating disorder, this book will provide you with some valuable insight from the experiences of this family. It is written with feeling and love --even some humor. I would highly recommend the book and suggest after you read it, share it with others. We all know it is a problem in our society and the Himmel's have helped us understand how their family is dealing with it.
anonymous
Informative and helpful.
The Rollers of Vildar
I have to admit, I'm completely fascinated by eating disorders. Fascinated in a car-crash type of way: I want to learn everything I can about them, I can't look away from any literature I can find on the subject, but the entire idea of starving oneself makes me so sad and almost sick to my stomach. So when I was approached about reviewing Hungry, I absolutely jumped at the chance.

This book is different from most eating disorder memoirs (and trust me, there are a LOT out there, some better and more interesting than others) in the fact that it's mostly the story of the anorexic's mother, Sheila. Lisa, the girl who suffers from anorexia, did co-write the book, but the memoir is much more Sheila's than her daughter's. And I have to say that it was quite interesting to read about anorexia from a mother's point of view. No parent wants to see their child hurt or suffering in any way, and this feeling must be compounded by about a billion when it's your child who is actually doing the harm to him/herself. Hungry perfectly illuminated this feeling - Sheila had to watch while her daughter starved herself for years, and she was completely unable to do anything that would help Lisa get better.

I definitely appreciated that Lisa had a voice in this memoir, too, because it was very interesting to read about certain periods of her life from Sheila's point of view, then read right away how Lisa experienced those same situations. At the time of the book's publishing, it was said that Lisa was in recovery from her eating disorder, and it was made clear that she is not "recovered" fully - she stated that she absolutely still has food issues, and has to make a conscious effort to not go back to disordered eating. I liked that she was so candid about her disorder; I think it is a help for women and girls who struggle with food issues to know that even someone who is "recovered" has to really work at being healthy. The disorder doesn't just go away, it's something that it is always a part of life if you have it, and I am glad that Lisa Himmel made this very clear in the book.

Hungry has a lot going for it. It is a super honest portrayal of one family's experience with an eating disorder, and because of its truth there is are a lot of heartwarming and funny moments in this book. It's not all doom and gloom, the Himmels seem like an extremely close and loving family and that really shows through in the book. I enjoyed this memoir and I finished it feeling close to Lisa and Sheila, and hoping for Lisa to get better and stay better - from what she wrote, it sounds like that is finally happening for her.