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by Alan Hollinghurst
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Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Alan Hollinghurst
  • ISBN:
    0307474348
  • ISBN13:
    978-0307474346
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage (September 4, 2012)
  • Pages:
    448 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1431 kb
  • ePUB format
    1600 kb
  • DJVU format
    1669 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    562
  • Formats:
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The Stranger’s Child itself is the culmination of not only Hollinghurst’s ambition but that secret literary tradition to. .

The Stranger’s Child itself is the culmination of not only Hollinghurst’s ambition but that secret literary tradition to which it is addressed. Geoff Dyer, New York Magazine "Charming. I know "plot" isn't really the point of this book, that Hollinghurst is trying to say big things about 20th century Britain, the art of biography, homosexuality, the class system, and so on. But there needs to be a good story to keep you reading, and there isn't enough of one. At least there is the writing to fall back on.

The Stranger’s Child itself is the culmination of not only Hollinghurst’s ambition but that secret literary tradition to.It starts out good, with tantalizing hints of a forbidden same-sex relationship, but - for an Alan Hollinghurst novel - the relationship isn't explored deeply or explicitly enough. Still, I kept with the book through its time changes, and after about 150 pages I became more absorbed and was glad I'd stuck with it.

The Stranger's Child (June 2011) is the fifth novel by Alan Hollinghurst. The book tells the story of a minor poet, Cecil Valance, who is killed in the First World War. In 1913 he visits a Cambridge friend, George Sawle, at the latter's home in Stanmore, Middlesex. While there Valance writes a poem entitled 'Two Acres', about the Sawles' house and addressed, ambiguously, either to George himself or to George's younger sister, Daphne.

ALAN HOLLINGHURST is the author of the novels The Stranger's Child, The Swimming-Pool Library, The Folding Star, The Spell, and The Line of Beauty, which won the Man Booker Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He has received the Somerset Maugham Award, the E. M. Forster Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. Библиографические данные. The Stranger's Child Vintage International.

In many ways, The Stranger's Child has the same qualities as his previous novels. And the new book certainly falls somewhat short of Hollinghurst's best work – The Swimming Pool Library, The Folding Star and The Line of Beauty. It is elegant, seductive and extremely enjoyable to read, and peppered with astute, apparently casual noticings. Of a man stumbling around in a shed at a party: "He was drunk, it was one of the hilarious uncorrectable disasters of being drunk. Unlike them, it's merely very good: it doesn't leave you dazed, page after page, with the brilliance, wit and subtlety of its perceptions. Is this an ungrateful line of criticism?

The strangers child, . Daphne slipped out of the hammock, put on her shoes, and forgot about her books.

The strangers child, . The Stranger's Child, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55. Alan hollinghurst. The stranger’s child. She started towards the house, but something in the time of day held her, with its hint of a mystery she had so far overlooked: it drew her down the lawn, past the rockery, where the pond that reflected the trees in silhouette had grown as deep as the white sky.

by Alan Hollinghurst. series Vintage International. Rich with Hollinghurst’s signature gifts-haunting sensuality, delicious wit and exquisite lyricism-The Stranger’s Child is a tour de force: a masterly novel about the lingering power of desire, how the heart creates its own history, and how legends are made.

It wasn’t easy: she was thinking all the while about George coming back with Cecil, and she kept sliding down, in small half-willing surrenders, till she was in a heap, with the book held tiringly above her face. 1. She’d been lying in the hammock reading poetry for over an hour. It wasn’t easy: she was thinking all the while about George coming back with Cecil, and she kept sliding down, in small half-willing surrenders, till she was in a heap, with the book held tiringly above her face.

Alan Hollinghurst’s new novel, The Stranger’s Child, reflects English values and attitudes from 1913 until .

Alan Hollinghurst’s new novel, The Stranger’s Child, reflects English values and attitudes from 1913 until the cellphone ag. It is seven years since Mr. Hollinghurst published his previous novel, the Man Booker Prize-winning Line of Beauty, which brilliantly savaged Thatcher’s Britain as a place of hypocrisy and self-interest. In that novel the hero, Nick Guest, was a middle-class boy with his nose pressed up against the glass.

Below him he could hear and then for a moment see a small boy hurrying downwards, saw a raised arm struggling into a jacket. Don’t run!’ oy looked up in horror, lost his footing, and slid down bump bump bump on the hard oak treads into the hall. Now you know why,’ Peter said, more quietly, and went back into his room. He had the first period free, then it was the Fifth Form for singing

A National Book Critics Award finalist from the Man Booker Prize-winning author of The Line of Beauty and The Sparsholt Affair: a magnificent, century-spanning saga about a love triangle that spawns a myth, and a family mystery, across generations. In the summer of 1913, George Sawle brings his Cambridge schoolmate—a handsome, aristocratic young poet named Cecil Valance—to his family’s home outside London. George is enthralled by Cecil, and soon his sister, Daphne, is equally besotted by him. That weekend, Cecil writes a poem that, after he is killed in the Great War and his reputation burnished, will become a touchstone for a generation, a work recited by every schoolchild in England. Over time, a tragic love story is spun, even as other secrets lie buried—until, decades later, an ambitious biographer threatens to unearth them.


Gandree
The same friend who encouraged me to read Hollinghusrt's 'The Line of Beauty' also referred me to this latest effort 'The Stranger's Child'. A fair amount of time passed between reading each book. However, I recall well the attention to detail and elegance of prose associated with the author's style in the first book. Like 'The Line of Beauty', it took me a while to get into the rhythm of the narrative of 'The Stranger's Child'. However, with the second book it took considerably longer.

Set in Edwardian England the story begins with the exploration of class, privilege and sexuality associated with that period of time. This is done largely through the character of one Cecil Valance, an erstwhile poet who gains posthumous notoriety for a poem called 'Two Acres'. The missive is read by Winston Churchill and becomes part of the collective consciousness of a later era. As such, scholars begin to delve deeper into the life of the poet who now lies in repose, likeness reproduced in marble, covering his crypt in a chapel on what was once the family estate.

Over time, the estate becomes a school and characters central to the story are introduced as the time line advances. Relationships are intertwined as scholarly research uncovers affairs, paternity questions, sexual orientation and a host of unresolved issues.

'The Stranger's Child' is not an easy read. Its attention to detail, while important stylistically, tends to become first a bit ponderous, then, boring. I found myself doing a lot of skimming without really missing much of the story line. As the story progresses though decades this reader found it difficult to follow the narrative thread that neatly ties an enjoyable story together.
santa
In "The Wizard of Oz," Dorothy, perplexed by the sudden appearances and disappearances of characters into thin air, exclaims (I paraphrase): "Gosh. People come and go so quickly here!" Dorothy, honey, wait until you read "The Stranger's Child." You ain't seen nothing yet.

As other reviewers have indicated, this tale begins in England before the first World War and continues through, in disconnected segments, to the present day. The main characters, Daphne, her brother George, and his lover Cecil (who makes a pass at Daphne -- don't ask) are at the crux of the beginning sequence, and spawn, as it were, the various other characters in the sequences and decades to come.

One could say that the novel attempts a panoramic scope of England's class system and sexual repressions through many decades, and that the novel therefore needs the series of scenarios and multiple characters, in the style of a classic Russian novel. But must we be subjected to numerous irrelevant characters and banal, sometimes obscure, situations that are fleetingly amusing, at best, and add nothing to the thrust of the novel?

I have so enjoyed previous Hollinghurst books. "The Swimming Pool Library" was unforgettable modern literature. But where was the editor for this enterprise? Sleeping in a field of poppies?
Tholmeena
I'm not sure what to think of this book. It's beautifully written, filled with wonderful little observations about the way people speak and comport themselves; unfortunately, the writing is not paired with a sufficiently interesting story.

It starts out good, with tantalizing hints of a forbidden same-sex relationship, but -- for an Alan Hollinghurst novel -- the relationship isn't explored deeply or explicitly enough. Still, I kept with the book through its time changes, and after about 150 pages I became more absorbed and was glad I'd stuck with it. I enjoyed the middle section the most, set in the late 1960s, because it focused on a budding romance between two appealing gay men and had a nice "comedy of manners" feel. But from there things went downhill; most of the last 150 pages consists of someone conducting interviews with various people for a biography. There is no sense of narrative propulsion, just one plodding interview after another. And because the biographer is trying to solve a mystery that we, the readers, already know the answer to, there is no suspense, either. I know "plot" isn't really the point of this book, that Hollinghurst is trying to say big things about 20th century Britain, the art of biography, homosexuality, the class system, and so on. But there needs to be a good story to keep you reading, and there isn't enough of one.

At least there is the writing to fall back on. The descriptions of a middle-aged woman playing the piano and an elderly woman writing out a check at the bank are little gems, and there are plenty of nice social observations. Yet the book is at times over-written. At certain points I wanted Hollinghurst to stop describing the hidden shades of meaning in what a character was saying and to just get on with it already.

(Also, he uses the word "mischievous" way too much.)

The book doesn't exactly fly by, so if you're in a hurry, look for something else. But if you don't care so much about plot and are in the mood to slow down and enjoy some fine writing, this might work for you.