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by Louisa M. Alcott
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  • Author:
    Louisa M. Alcott
  • ISBN:
    1440042861
  • ISBN13:
    978-1440042867
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Forgotten Books (February 10, 2017)
  • Pages:
    306 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1756 kb
  • ePUB format
    1450 kb
  • DJVU format
    1236 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    958
  • Formats:
    mobi azw mbr lrf


Eight Cousins, or The Aunt-Hill was published in 1875 by American novelist Louisa May Alcott.

Eight Cousins, or The Aunt-Hill was published in 1875 by American novelist Louisa May Alcott. It is the story of Rose Campbell, a lonely and sickly girl who has been recently orphaned and must now reside with her maiden great aunts (yet having a guardian), who are the matriarchs of her wealthy Boston family. When Rose's guardian, Uncle Alec, returns from abroad, he takes over her care

The Author is quite aware of the defects of this little story, many ofwhich were unavoidable, as it first appeared serially.

by. LOUISA M. ALCOTT, Author of "Little Women," "An Old-Fashioned Girl," "Little Men,""Rose in Bloom," "Under the Lilacs," "Jack and Jill,""Hospital Sketches," "Work," "Silver Pitchers,""Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag. Boston: roberts brothers. University press: john wilson & son, cambridge.

Eight Cousins - Or, the Aunt-Hill - Louisa M. Alcott. Gentle Aunt Peace had tried all sorts of pretty needle-work, and planned a doll’s wardrobe that would have won the heart of even an older child

Eight Cousins - Or, the Aunt-Hill - Louisa M. Chapter I. Two girls. Gentle Aunt Peace had tried all sorts of pretty needle-work, and planned a doll’s wardrobe that would have won the heart of even an older child. But Rose took little interest in pink satin hats and tiny hose, though she sewed dutifully till her aunt caught her wiping tears away with the train of a wedding-dress, and that discovery put an end to the sewing society. Then both old ladies put their heads together and picked out the model child of the neighborhood to come and play with their niece.

In short, I can see why this one never became the classic that Little Women di. .

Start by marking Eight Cousins: Or the Aunt-Hill as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In short, I can see why this one never became the classic that Little Women di.

Books related to Eight Cousins; OR, THE AUNT-HILL. The Diary of a Young Girl. Pat of Silver Bush and Mistress Pat. Lucy Maud Montgomery.

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.

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Gentle Aunt Peace had tried all sorts of pretty needle-work, and planned a doll's . I could stand the aunts, but there are dozens of cousins, dreadful boys all of them, and I detest boys!

Gentle Aunt Peace had tried all sorts of pretty needle-work, and planned a doll's wardrobe that would have won the heart of even an older child. I don't have any books to read, and all the spare time I get I run off into the woods; that rests me better than stories," answered Phebe, as she finished one job and began on another. I could stand the aunts, but there are dozens of cousins, dreadful boys all of them, and I detest boys!

The sketch was reprinted in the volume Silver Pitchers (1876), which . Eight Cousins or The Aunt-Hill (1875).

The sketch was reprinted in the volume Silver Pitchers (1876), which relates the family's experiment in "plain living and high thinking" at Fruitlands. Poverty made it necessary for Alcott to go to work at an early age as a teacher, seamstress, governess, domestic helper, and writer In the mid-1860s, Alcott wrote passionate, fiery novels and sensational stories under the nom de plume A. M. Barnard. Rose in Bloom: A Sequel to Eight Cousins (1876).

Excerpt from Eight Cousins: Or the Aunt-HillThe Author is quite aware of the defects of this little story, many of which were unavoidable, as it first appeared serially. But, as Uncle Alec's experiment was intended to amuse the young folks, rather than surest educational improvements for the consideration of the elders, she trusts that the short-comings will be overlooked by the friends of the Eight Cousins, and she will try to make amends in a second volume, which shall attempt to show The Rose In Bloom.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

lucky kitten
Most YA books of a modern turn would have had Rose rush about flirting like mad and knocking down walls with her fists in her ardor to be independent and find love. But, the lost art of writing a pleasant character whose only wish is to be worth something and to love someone worth loving is not found in most modern fiction. LM Alcott writes with firm, frank beliefs that are openly expressed and understood: Women should be independent but not harsh; Men should be driven and not dissipate; Children should be loved and not neglected; And, life should be lived uprightly to the best extent of your gifts and not lazily to the disparaging of your talents. Most of all, she wants her readers to know that love isn't always the grand illusion that we build for ourselves, and the handsome hopes we have don't always happen, much to our betterment in some cases, that the ordinary and good is surprisingly the best option. All in all, this is what every young person should read, for good character and honesty is overlooked in today's society for quick wit mixed with malice and originality to the great chagrin of us all.

My only criticism is the treatment of Fun See. However, for the time period it was VERY progressive for Alcott to marry him to a well-to-do American girl, she showed great ignorance in her writing of the character, which, to be fair, was the common treatment of anyone Asian.
Wenyost
The sequel to Eight Cousins, Rose In Blue follows the cousins as they grow up. Written as cleanly and delicately as Alcott's other works, we follow Rose, Mac, Charlie, Phoebe and the rest of the family on Aunt Hill through adolescence to their adult success, and it's every bit as engaging and heart-warming as Eight Cousins was.

Even after decades of life, and a half dozen reads or so, this book still makes me tear up in places, and I am not ashamed to admit that in the least. The book recalls a time and culture that were cleaner and simpler in many ways than what we have now, and turning the pages is like going back in time--I have so many happy memories tied up with this book, and others I enjoyed as a young girl.

You won't find all the tools modern authors use to hold attention here--violence, sex, bad language or unnatural, ridiculous plots and sub-plots. What you will find is simple, clear language, a smooth presentation of the values and morals of the authoress' times, and very simple, human characters that worry about the only things that are really important in life, when you come right down to it.

Louisa May Alcott's books should be the first books you introduce your child to--because the world (and the people in it) still need the values she writes about so naturally, and you'd be hard pressed to find those values in any of the "modern" children's books on the market. And for adults--why not take a trip back into your childhood and enjoy a simple, well written book again?
Llathidan
I read most of Louisa May Alcott's books when I was young and loved them. I recently re-read "Rose in Bloom" and found it charming. This, of course, is the sequel to "Eight Cousin" and tells us what happened to Rose and her cousins when they grow up.
Yes, the book is strongly moralistic and it's supposed to be. Remember, it's written for children and teens and it's supposed to be instructional. What lifts it from being some kind of religious tract is the lovely story of Rose and her family.
Unfortunately, I suspect that this book, like so many others, will gradually disappear. Paragraphs aren't supposed to be more than a couple of sentences. Morality is out; dystopia is in; and, if the pace isn't breathtaking, the book's a dud. Like other parents, I wanted to share books I loved with my children. I had success with some books, but, unfortunately Louisa May Alcott was a step too far.
In the meantime, though, thanks to Chios Classics and other publishers who are re-printing these classics and making them available on Kindle. Us oldsters remember them fondly.
Terr
This Kindle version of the book unhappily has no illustrations, and suffers from the loss of all the em-dashes and semicolons, which turns quite a few of the sentences into punctuation puzzles to solve. However, it doesn't seem to have many misspellings or lost text, and you can't argue with the price.

As for the content itself, I loved this book as a child, but hadn't read it in decades. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the story still holds up: in fact, I had trouble putting it down, and looked forward to getting back to it each evening. There is one chapter (about "sensational" fiction) that is really just too preachy (especially given Alcott's own history as a writer of thrillers), but most of the little lessons woven throughout the story are softened enough with humor and humanity that they go down pretty easily, in my opinion. Although the book presents an idealized world that never really existed, the characters are so distinctive and believable that you can't help but get caught up in their joys and troubles. Alcott's belief in altruism for its own sake does lend a heartfelt glow to the pages, if you have any aspirations toward altruism. And, grown-up as I am, reading the book did make me want to romp about outside the way the children do, and take a few of the lessons for my own use (though I just can't get behind the one about cold baths).

Although Alcott can seem a bit too earnest and do-gooding for modern children, it's useful to remember that some of what the book advocates was considered radical in its day, such as the idea that the heroine, Rose, should understand her own finances, study human anatomy, and prepare herself to make her own decisions about her life and status as an heiress. The book also champions the work of housewives in a way that can be unusual even today.

I was a bit worried about how I would feel when Rose meets up with two minor Chinese characters, but the scene was actually less racist than I had remembered. Though a few comments about things like "yellow" skin would not be acceptable today, and one of the characters is perhaps treated a bit too comically, for the time, Alcott held a remarkably modern view of race relations. She shows in a later book that she has no problem with a Chinese person marrying a white person, which is far beyond what her contemporary Anthony Trollope could conceive, though his writing is more modern than hers in most other respects.

Alcott's writing style is pretty conversational, and I believe it's simple and straightforward enough that most older children will have little trouble understanding the language, though the book was published nearly 140 years ago.