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by Tomi Ungerer
Download Zeralda's Ogre fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Tomi Ungerer
  • ISBN:
    0370015398
  • ISBN13:
    978-0370015392
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bodley Head Children's Books (1970)
  • Pages:
    32 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1330 kb
  • ePUB format
    1389 kb
  • DJVU format
    1403 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    260
  • Formats:
    mbr doc lrf mobi


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The giant appetite of the ogre could only be satisfied by the flesh of children until young Zeralda tamed his taste buds with her culinary art.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Tomi’s books provide a wonderful insight into his creative genius and diverse visual styles. Not one to rest on his laurels; he is always pushing boundaries, exploring humanity and challenging his audience

Tomi’s books provide a wonderful insight into his creative genius and diverse visual styles. Not one to rest on his laurels; he is always pushing boundaries, exploring humanity and challenging his audience. Tomi’s diverse body of work is notoriously difficult to pigeonhole or categorise because he believes that each project necessitates its own style. His books range from children’s books such as The Three Robbers and Fog Island to memoirs documenting different chapters in his life such as A Childhood Under the Nazis and Far Out Isn’t Far Enough

The giant appetite of the ogre could only be satisfied by the flesh.

Jean-Thomas "Tomi" Ungerer (28 November 1931 – 9 February 2019) was an Alsatian artist and writer. He published over 140 books ranging from children's books to adult works and from the fantastic to the autobiographical

Jean-Thomas "Tomi" Ungerer (28 November 1931 – 9 February 2019) was an Alsatian artist and writer. He published over 140 books ranging from children's books to adult works and from the fantastic to the autobiographical. He was known for sharp social satire and witty aphorisms. Ungerer is also famous as a cartoonist and designer of political posters and film posters. Ungerer received the international Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1998 for his "lasting contribution" as a children's illustrator.

Tomi Ungerer was born Jean-Thomas Ungerer in Strasbourg, France on November 28, 1931. He wrote and illustrated children's books as well as books for adults. His first children's book, The Mellops Go Flying, was published in 1957. His other children's books included Crictor, No Kiss for Mother, and Moon Man. His books for adults included The Underground Sketchbook of Tomi Ungerer, Fornicon, Tomi: A Childhood Under the Nazis, and Far Out Isn't Far Enough. He also created illustrations for advertisements including a series of posters for The Times in the 1960s.

Tomi Ungerer - Official Site of world renowned and award winning author, artist and designer Tomi Ungerer. Tomi died peacefully in his sleep with a book beside him, on February 9th of this year. His art and writing continues to be honoured and enjoyed across the world with numerous exhibitions, special events and two new picture books out this year – Non Stop and Dies Und Das from Diogenes and other publishers. Tomi’s imagination never slept. His life and work defied easy categorization.

But then this ogre doesn't know very much about Zeralda, either! When they finally come face to face, marvelously funny things begin to happen.

Author:Ungerer, Tomi. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. See all 3 pre-owned listings. Sold alia (386949)99. 2% positive FeedbackContact seller.

Shipped from UK, please allow 10 to 21 business days for arrival. Very Good, 23.5x40cm. First UK edition. Un-paginated. Wonderful, bright coloured illustration to every page by Diogenes Verlag. Endpapers free from inscription. Bound within paper covered boards, illustrated with Zeralda and the Ogre to upper; very good condition with minimal wear to top and tail of spine. Displayed within original price clipped dust jacket, illustrated to match the boards; a little worn to edges and lower but in very good condition.

Ariurin
This book was at my public library growing up. I absolutely loved the illustrations and adored the fearlessness and passion I saw in Zeralda. After the years went by, the book was gone and I had the hardest time finding it anywhere. Now I share this story with my own niece. Thank you. ????
Abywis
Finally tracked down after 30 years! I remembered this story clearly as it was a favourite. Something about the details of the gormet meals described or in the happy ending appealed. Great pictures too. But it was dated and not entirely appropriate for my children (2 and 4 years). The sinister ogre and his ogre-y mates eat children with a little more detail than is necessary. Then he ends up (spoiler alert) marrying his hostage. Not exactly a girl-power ending. Great cooking though!
Talrajas
I read this to my kids nearly fifty years ago, having picked it out at the library, just being curious. It has been a family favorite ever since. Thought we would never see it again, after all those years.
Uickabrod
I have loved this book for 35 years, since my then kindergartener borrowed it from the school library. I was so pleased to find an affordable copy. I purchased two. One for each of my youngest grandchildren.
Bliss
"Once upon a time there lived a lonely ogre. Like most ogres he had sharp teeth, a bristling beard, a big nose, a big knife, a bad temper, and a huge appetite. Of all things, he liked little children for breakfast the best" (from text).

And he wanted to eat little Zeralda, too. But, fortunately for her, he made a mistake. And as a result of this mistake he never ate little children--or anybody--again. Zeralda had a lot to do with this change of eating habit. She didn't outsmart him or use magic, but she did eventually fall in love with and marry him. Can you imagine that! (This folktale-like picture book will be thoroughly enjoyed by primary grade students, especially as a read-aloud.)

The Creative Teacher: Activities for Language Arts (Grades 4 through 8 and Up)
heart of sky
The story of a little girl and how her skills in the kitchen win over the child eating grumpy ogre, is something that should be shared with everyone.

This is such a sweet tale, of how love and a love for food can cure even the grouchiest of us adult ogres. I've yet to find a child that doesn't enjoy this book or the pictures. Tomi Ungerer is right up there with the likes of Dr. Suess and Steven Kellogg.
Meztisho
This classic book is one of my childhood favorites. Growing up, it reached mythic proportions in my memory. I recently bought it for my 2-year-old daughter, and she loves it too. It's a memorable tale of a nasty ogre who craves little children until a guileless girl converts him with her prodigy-like culinary genius.
Zeralda's Ogre is great on a number of different levels. It has a scary element that I loved when I was a kid - kind of a Grimm's Fairy Tale aspect. Now that I'm a grown-up, I recognize a terrific sly sense of humor in it as well. The illustrations are great - filled with fun little details (bugs, lizards, etc.) that little ones like to seek out. And the descriptions of Zeralda's masterpieces are great.
I can't recommend this book strongly enough - I just wish the hardcover was still in print!
A grumpy pirate-like Ogre terrorizes a peasant village shutting down shops, markets and even schools because of his appetite for children. Zeralda, the daughter of a poor working man loves to cook. She cooks such great dishes that when her father falls ill and she is forced to go to market in his place she is able to save the day. Rescuing the hungry Ogre from his own clumsiness and his irrational appetite, Zeralda gives him tastes he never forgets. Soon all the Ogres want what's in Zeralda's kitchen. None want it as much as Zeralda's Ogre though. In a surprise and twisted ending, she marries him. If Disney can pull it off with Shrek, then author Tomi Ungerer should get accolades for her work too. I read this story to a large group of preschoolers and they really enjoyed it.