Download New Boy fb2

by Julian Houston
Download New Boy fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Julian Houston
  • ISBN:
    0618432531
  • ISBN13:
    978-0618432530
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HMH Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (November 28, 2005)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1998 kb
  • ePUB format
    1557 kb
  • DJVU format
    1633 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    795
  • Formats:
    docx lrf doc txt


In the book New Boy, by Julian Houston, a fifteen year old African American boy named Rob Garret is trapped in a world of segregation

In the book New Boy, by Julian Houston, a fifteen year old African American boy named Rob Garret is trapped in a world of segregation. Rob’s number one dream is to prove himself in this world of impossibilities for his race. Unfortunately, in the 1950’s, his homeland Virginia, does not offer him as much as he needs for success. Because Rob has extremely good grades compared to most of his classmates, his parents take the unusual step of sending him to the Draper Boarding School in Connecticut.

Continue reading the main story. NEW BOY. By Julian Houston. One hint that Julian Houston, who is now an associate justice of the Superior Court of Massachusetts, was an eyewitness to this period is his comfort with bygone terms - relics like "colored" and "Negro. 282 pp. Houghton Mifflin Company. His dignified prose, like Rob's cautious formality, is a good match for a tie-wearing era. Advertisement.

New Boy. Julian Houston. This book takes place in 1950's America where racial prejudice and segregation was rampant; this could have been an interesting especially told through the eyes of a young African American boy, but instead he just talks about making it on the honour roll.

This is one of the best books I've read set inside a New England prep school and is probably the most finely-crafted book I've read on American racism from a black perspective. I recommend it strongly and hope for more from this terrific author.

The club itself was a squat, brick one-story fortress, with small windows that seemed to be painted over to block the entry of light from outside.

The club itself was a squat, brick one-story fortress, with small windows that seemed to be painted over to block the entry of light from outside moan of a saxophone and I tried to contain my excitement. I wanted to act as though going to Jinxie's was something that I did every day. A dark-skinned Negro man with a moon face and wearing a tuxedo greeted us at the door. Good evening, gentlemen," he said, smiling. I let Gordie do the talking

New Boy - Julian Houston. Gripping, true to life story of a young southern black boy who goes North to boarding school, sent by his parents to escape segregation.

New Boy - Julian Houston. Well-written though there are a few spots where the grown judge drowns out the vulnerable boy. Very nicely done, overall. lemonlover 1Go to lemonlover 1's profile. by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on May 21, 2013.

Fifteen-year-old Rob Garrett wants nothing more than to escape the segregated South and prove himself. Fifteen-year-old Rob Garrett wants nothing more than to escape the segregated South and prove himself. But in late 1950s Virginia, opportunity doesn't come easily to an African American. This is history without the sensationalism, in which small acts of resistance eventually change the rules

New Boy. This is history without the sensationalism, in which small acts of resistance eventually change the rules. -School Library Journal In this compelling debut novel, a. sixteen-year-old African American boy discovers the world-and himself-when he integrates an all-white boarding school in the 1950s.

Title: New Boy By: Julian Houston Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 288 Vendor: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Houston's depiction of racism during the 1950s is brutally honest. Publication Date: 2007 Dimensions: . 0 X . 5 (inches) ISBN: 061888405X ISBN-13: 9780618884056 Stock No: WW884056. With a likeable narator making tough decisions, New Boy is bound to elicit lively discussions. A strongly effective work of historical fiction. Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books.

Fifteen-year-old Rob Garrett wants nothing more than to escape the segregated South and prove himself. But in late 1950s Virginia, opportunity doesn’t come easily to an African American. So Rob’s parents take the unusual step of enrolling their son in a Connecticut boarding school, where he will have the best education available. He will also be the first student of color in the school’s history. No matter—Rob Garrett is on his way.    But times are changing. While Rob is experiencing the privilege and isolation of private school, a movement is rising back home. Men and women are organizing, demanding an end to segregation, and in Rob’s hometown, his friends are on the verge of taking action. There is even talk about sitting in at a lunch counter that refuses to serve black people. How can Rob hope to make a difference when he’s a world away?


Dilmal
"It won't be easy," the narrator's cousin tells him referring to his attending a posh New England prep school, and it isn't. Rob, who has previously attended the public schools of his Southern hometown, struggles with issues of class and race at his new school. The odd thing, though, is that three quarters of these growth experiences take place OUT of school. The narrator is barely back at school before he's bouncing off again on vacation. So it is not really a story about the prep school life.

Most of the racism and classism Rob encounters and struggles with occurs away from the school. Through his friendship with a Jewish student and their experiences in Harlem, he becomes aware of Malcolm X and the civil rights movement. Eventually, he and his friends back home form a sit-in, however the action is over in just a few pages, while the reader is reasonably expecting it to be the climax of the book.

The narrator is smart and likeable, but the reader feels a distance; although the events that occur are by turns painful, exhilirating and disturbing, it is as if the author is holding us at arm's length.
Hurus
Even if you've never wondered what it was like to move through life as a black american in the 1960s, Julian Houston's "New Boy" will open you up to those facts -- enough of them, anyway, to change your thinking on that subject. In this skillfully restrained story, which unfolds quickly and hangs onto you after you've put it down, Houston takes a simple idea (southern black boy at a 1960s New England prep school) and weaves an intricate quilt of characters and situations that places this story among the classics. Houston's even-keeled voice puts his readers at ease as we take in some unnerving details, particularly concerning our nation's bigoted south in the relatively near past. This is one of the best books I've read set inside a New England prep school and is probably the most finely-crafted book I've read on American racism from a black perspective. I recommend it strongly and hope for more from this terrific author.
IGOT
too preachy
Nenayally
This story describes the life of a typical teenage African-American from Virginia attending school in Connecticut, during the 1950's. The topic of the book is very attracting and engages the reader instantly. The reader may become very enthusiastic in the beginning and be eager to share about the read which would pique the interest of others, but soon after the reader will realize the book is slow, and no longer interesting until about halfway through the book. There is some rising action as the reader approaches the end, but the reader will become disappointed with the climax and the ending to the book.
Olma
Great book! Good for anyone high school age and above!
Sharpbrew
Interesting read. Coming of age story set against a period or racial segregation and tumultuous social changes in America.Interesting perspective of racial integration in an all-white school. Compelling novel.
VizoRRR
I would recommend this book to young and old alike. It opens ones eyes to the severe discrimination that African Americans endured in the south in the late 50's and on, and reveals that the prejudices were not as strong in the north. For example, in the south AA people were not allowed served at Woolworth's lunch counters, but in New York they were. It also reveals that racial prejudice and segregation is and was not only racial.
Great