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by Kenneth Grahame
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Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Kenneth Grahame
  • ISBN:
    1405228229
  • ISBN13:
    978-1405228220
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    STERLING JUVENILE BO; New Ed edition (2006)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1254 kb
  • ePUB format
    1236 kb
  • DJVU format
    1851 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    653
  • Formats:
    doc mbr lrf mobi


Kenneth Grahame The Wind in the Willows The River Bank The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring-cleaning his little home. First with brooms, then with dusters; then on ladders and steps and chairs, with a brush and a pail of whitewash; till he had dust in his throat and eyes, and splashes of whitewash all over his black fur, and an aching back and weary arms.

Home Kenneth Grahame The Wind in the Willows. Oh, from bad to worse," said the Rat gravely, while the Mole, cockedup on a settle and basking in the firelight, his heels higher than hishead, tried to look properly mournful. The wind in the willows, .

Far from fading with time, Kenneth Grahame's classic tale of fantasy has attracted a growing audience in each generation. Each one is gloriously beautiful, but I do adore Ingpen's color and his detail. Fans of Ingpen know his work on such books as Treasure Island.

The Wind in the Willows is a children's novel by Scottish novelist Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow-moving and fast-paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animals: Mole, Rat (a European water vole), Toad, and Badger. They live in a pastoral version of Edwardian England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie, and celebrated for its evocation of the nature of the Thames Valley.

Kenneth Grahame had already established himself as a talented Some of the best children’s classics have started with an adult inventing stories to tell to a child.

one does not argue about The Wind in the Willows. The young man gives it to the girl with whom he is in love, and if she does not like it, he asks her to return his letters. Kenneth Grahame had already established himself as a talented Some of the best children’s classics have started with an adult inventing stories to tell to a child. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Winnie the Pooh, Peter Pan and even Watership Down all began this way, as did many others. The Wind in the Willows is another such.

Kenneth Grahame was a British writer, most famous for The Wind in the Willows, one of the . Meanwhile, he contributed articles to such journals as the St. James Gazette and the Yellow Book and published collections of sketches, stories, and essays.

Kenneth Grahame was a British writer, most famous for The Wind in the Willows, one of the classics of children's literature. Orphaned at an early age, Grahame went to live with his grandmother in England and attended St. Edward’s School, Oxford. Money was lacking for him to go to university. Some of these stories were collected and published as Pagan Papers in 1893, and, two years later, The Golden Age. These were followed by Dream Days in 1898, which contains The Reluctant Dragon.

3594 79 19 5 20 46. Although "The Wind in the Willows" was primarily written for a young audience, the book can be of great interest to both children and adults. It follows the adventures of wild animals living on the river bank. Mr. Toad is very rich and lives in a luxurious house called Toad Hall. Toad is a good animal, but he is extremely vain. Besides, he has a weird obsession with vehicles: boats, caravans, motorcars.

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Felhann
This edition is called "The Classic Edition" and Kenneth Graham is the author. However, beware, this is not the long edition that I have read several times before. This is a shortened edition. I did not realize when I purchased it that "Classic Edition" was not the full version. The illustrations are beautiful, and the story is fine, but the shortened length deprives the reader of the detailed delights in the full version.
Buge
I first had this story read to me before I could actually read the thing to myself and since that time I have probably read this particular book/story a couple of dozen times. Each reading reveals more hidden “word treasures” and I enjoy it as much now that I am as old as dirt as I did when I was a young grasshopper.

One thing about it; as you get older, and hopefully wiser, you discover observations of human nature in the pages of this book that are often times overlooked by the young reader. As an old man I can now read this book and picture in my mind individuals I have known and met throughout my life that are living parallels to the characters in this book...good grief, I can even find myself if I am dead honest with myself!

This one is considered a classic and for good reason. I suspect that it will remain so for years and years to come. Some stories are simply timeless.
spark
With Robert Ingpen's illustrated edition, The Wind in the Willows is now given a beautiful makeover. I have read several different editions of Wind in the Willows to my children. Each one is gloriously beautiful, but I do adore Ingpen's color and his detail. Fans of Ingpen know his work on such books as Treasure Island.

First off, Wind in the Willows is a beautifully written tale, as many others here have already told. So well written, it is, that some people believe it shouldn't be illustated at all. However, as an artist, I am not in that camp. I appreciate a person willing to render 2D or 3D life to the written word. What a task!

This is a book which one can pick it up and put it down as one wishes. We sometimes read our favorite bits over and over. Grahame's writing is perfection, and we voice his characters for fun sometimes. There's a silly claymation television series that was done in the 1980s if you want to show the kids the t.v. version after you've read it to them. It was available on Netflix - not sure if it still is.

Also, for 'purists', fyi, this is the book in its unabridged form (the original full length tale).

For those looking for the abridged version, with lovely illustrations, check out the version with Inga Moore as illustrator. Moore has illustrated a version of The Secret Garden which is also lovely.
Halloween
The story is great, and the Wordsworth Children's edition offers a complete, unabridged version with original photos - one per chapter. And there's the rub. There are now slightly abridged editions with wonderful illustrations, and full versions with more pictures, which is what small children often enjoy most about reading. I was upset that the reviews for all editions of the book were clumped together, so I couldn't tell which book people actually liked best, unless they pointed it out. As a final note, I've got a degree in literature, and I appreciated the original text. I've since seen the slightly abridged and fully illustrated Candlewick Illustrated Classics version, and would so much have preferred that one, if I had known.
Cerekelv
The Wind in the Willows is a very sweet, quaint and cozy collection of stories about animals who are kind of like humans. They have their little gentleman's society which functions pretty much as the English equivalent at the turn of the century. In the cultural regard, it has aged a little, so don't expect a single female character who is, well, basically a character at all, and you might encounter other details that would constitute a faux pas right now, but ultimately, the book is not about that. It's about true friendship, about being kind and nice and generally about the cozy and calm life - a life we seem to never really live anymore in the 21st century. Yes, this is a book I could read to children. This is a book that soothed me so much that it could put me to sleep when I suffered anxiety. This is a very sweet and lovely book, even despite some of the moralising in the stories (which, by the way, is done in a nice, not preachy way), it was very enjoyable indeed.

You will probably like this if you enjoyed books like Anne of Green Gables.
Doomblade
This review isn't about the story; if you haven't read it by now, get the book and read it. This is a nice solid hardcover with a place marker ribbon, a good choice for our six year old granddaughter. The biggest drawback to this edition (and the reason for the 4 stars) is the relatively small number of illustrations.....but what there are are good.
I would probably have preferred an edition with the illustrations by E.H. Shepard or Arthur Rackham (although the former would be more appropriate for someone who is six. However, neither of those editions was available on Amazon at less than collector's prices.

The most dismaying thing in my search for this book is the number of abridged versions for sale, which I believe to be unconscionable. I can well imagine those sections of the book that a modern editor / publisher might feel "superfluous," particularly for young readers. Well, if someone finds a chapter tedious, skip over it. It's not like that won't be necessary later in life, and with any number of other books.