Download Mockingbird fb2

by Kathryn Erskine
Download Mockingbird fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Kathryn Erskine
  • ISBN:
    0545307252
  • ISBN13:
    978-0545307253
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Scholastic (2011)
  • Pages:
    235 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1359 kb
  • ePUB format
    1356 kb
  • DJVU format
    1310 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    388
  • Formats:
    azw rtf mobi txt


Mockingbird is a young adult novel by American author Kathryn Erskine about a girl with Asperger's syndrome coping with the loss of her brother. National Book Award for Young People's Literature. In 2012 it was awarded.

Mockingbird is a young adult novel by American author Kathryn Erskine about a girl with Asperger's syndrome coping with the loss of her brother. In 2012 it was awarded the Dolly Gray Children's Literature Award. Based on a school shooting. The main character is a 10-year-old girl with Asperger's syndrome named Caitlin Smith and is preoccupied with drawing and dictionaries.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER and ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT NOVELS OF OUR TIME FOR YOUNG READERS Caitlin has Asperger's. The world according to her is black and white; anything in between is confusing.

Kathryn Erskin. ockingbird won America's National Book award. Kathryn Erskine's evocation of "Asperger thinking" is impressive and sensitively managed, but such narrowing of the focus reinforces the story's programmatic nature

Kathryn Erskin. Ten-year-old Caitlin Smith is doubly bereaved. Two years ago her mother died of cancer; now her beloved older brother Devon has been randomly murdered in a shooting at their American middle school. Kathryn Erskine's evocation of "Asperger thinking" is impressive and sensitively managed, but such narrowing of the focus reinforces the story's programmatic nature. The past 10 years have seen an outburst of children's novels with autistic characters, particularly in the US, where Mockingbird won the prestigious National Book award.

Mockingbird, Kathryn Erskine. p. cm. Summary: Ten-year-old. Caitlin, who has Asperger’s syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy

This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from the publisher, Philomel Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, 345 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014. Mockingbird, Kathryn Erskine. Caitlin, who has Asperger’s syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy

I run-walk to her room because of No Running In The Halls

I run-walk to her room because of No Running In The Halls. cult life event? She stands up from the round table. What do you mean? Closure, I say. I’m talking about Closure. How do I find it? Sit down Caitlin. are you talking about the news? The boy from the shooting? I nod about a hundred times because she is a little slow Getting It today. This is very stressful for our entire community. We’re all looking for Closure

Book Report-Mockingbird By: Kathryn Erskine.

Book Report-Mockingbird By: Kathryn Erskine.

Kathryn Erskine spent many years as a lawyer before realizing that she’d .

Kathryn Erskine spent many years as a lawyer before realizing that she’d rather write things that people might actually enjoy reading.

Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger's Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father. Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger's Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father. Topics in Mockingbird. Pages: 235. Book Type: chapter. Publication Date: January 1, 2010. ISBN 13: 9780399252648. Join Our Kids Book Club.

Reading Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine gave me a new perspective on life from someone who sees the world . Kathryn Erskine spent many years as a lawyer before realizing that she’d rather write things that people might actually enjoy reading.

Reading Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine gave me a new perspective on life from someone who sees the world differently than me. My heart went out to Caitlin because her older brother was gone and she. The faculty, of course, did not consist of wizards, although. how did the headmistress know that it was the wee redhead who led the campaign to free the mice from the biology lab?

In Caitlin's world, everything is black or white. Things are good or bad. Anything in between is confusing. That's the stuff Caitlin's older brother, Devon, has always explained. But now Devon;s dead and Dad is no help at all. Caitlin wants to get over it, but a an eleven-year-old girl with Asperger's, she doesn't know how. When she reads the definition of closure, she realizes that it is what she needs. In her search for it, Caitlin discovers that not everything is black or white -- the world is full of colors -- messy and beautiful. (From the back cover.)

Marige
As a female aspie myself, I found Caitlin's voice to be perfect. There are some negative comments here about how her voice is "inauthentic," particularly the incongruous inconsistencies in her intelligence. She can research a sophisticated report on how the heart works but she doesn't know what a "fun raiser" is? To me, this was one of the most authentic parts of the book, speaking as a child who elicited exactly the same reaction from adults as Caitlyn does to the negative reviewers here -- it doesn't make sense that you are so smart and so dumb. You must be pretending when you act like you don't understand something, after all, your vocabulary tests at six years above grade level...

And Caitlyn's obsessive attachment to "closure" (another thing some reviewers say doesn't ring true) is typical of the aspie predilection for perseveration. Caitlyn is =searching= for much of the book for something she can perseverate on. So many things that make her ring true as an aspie to me are exactly the things that make the character seem inauthentic to some reviewers.

Which brings me to the subject of empathy, and Caitlyn's manifest lack of it. This "lack of empathy" goes both ways. Aspies have a hard time empathizing with neurotypicals because neurotypicals are so baffling, but neurotypicals find aspies just as baffling and neurotypicals have as much difficulty empathizing with aspies as vice versa -- Exhibit A, the reviewers who find Caitlyn's voice not to ring true precisely because of her aspie characteristics. Im my experience, aspies easily empathize with other aspies (as I certainly did with Caitlin!)

And one comment about the famous literalness of aspies. Sometimes I hear it implied that the reason that aspies take things literally is because they do not understand metaphor or have no imagination. Neither of those is true. What it is is that, if you take something as a metaphor, chances are that your interpretation will be completely different from what the neurotypical person intended. So literal interpretation of everyone's words is a way to be safe, it's like staying on a safe patch of solid ground surrounded by a swamp filled with quicksand -- once you leave the safe ground of default literalism, chances are good that you will find yourself stepping into a quicksand of misunderstanding, and struggling to straighten out the misunderstanding will only make you sink so deeply you get swallowed up. See, aspies can understand and use metaphors perfectly well.

And one reviewer thought that using the metaphor "dip her toe into" was out of character for an aspie, because aspies don't use metaphor. Or aren't supposed to. To me, it was perfect -- it symbolized that Caitlin was starting to feel safe enough in the social world that her mind could start to move out of the safety of literalness.
FreandlyMan
This is a really great book. I purchased it for myself to read and if I felt it was appropriate for my 11 year old daughter who has Aspergers. I cried and laughed throughout the book. I saw so much of my girl in it and it made me both sad and happy. It was nice to see a story told from the perspective of someone who thinks differently than myself and it made me feel more connected with my daughter. My daughter saw me reading it and asked what it was about. I told her a brief synopsis but didn't tell her about the Aspergers part. She had been recently diagnosed and we had discussed it with her but she really wasn't comprehending it all. I was curious to see how she would react to the book. She read the book and kept coming to me amazed that this girl thinks like I do, or this girl does this and that's how I do it, etc. She kept seeing herself in the character of the book. She laughed and cried as well but I think for different reasons then I did. After she read the book she asked me about Aspergers again and we talked about it again. She really enjoyed the main character of the book and the story. A very good read.
Faezahn
What is autism? Can't quite explain it? Read this book. It's told from the first-person POV of a young girl with Aspergers. Her family and the community are trying to heal from a tragic school shooting. The protag lost her older brother. She watches as others (especially her father) struggle with their emotions while trying to explain her own, but of course, she processes differently than others. Along the way she forms relationships with two other children affected: one whose mother was killed and the cousin of the perpetrator. The three of them band together and grow. This is not only a great story about friendship and healing, but also does a great job explaining how people with ASD view the world. This is such a good book that I use it in my high school class, despite it being more appropriate for middle school readers.
Fesho
I am 15 and this is my second time reading this book. The first time I read it was in 4th grade, and I am going into 9th grade this coming school year. I read this book in 2 days. The first time was for reading group, but in 4th grade, I didn't understand the depths of this book. But for some reason I liked it and it stuck in the back of my head for years. I re-read it and I loved it. Watching Caitlyn develop and understand others better even with her disability really made me happy. It was confusing understanding why she did things, but as you saw her reasoning it helped me understand her difficulties in getting things and helped me understand how the disability is inconvenient for ones whom have it. Overall an amazing book.
anonymous
My 5th grade daughter loved this book and said it was one of her favorites. She read some parts to me, and told me about it the whole way, and it was very interesting. If you like books about people and how they deal with adversities you would enjoy this book. It also gave my daughter a little bit of an education about autism as it lead to discussions about the disorder since the main character has autism. I'm glad we purchased this and my daughter highly recommends this book.