Download Rodzina fb2

by Karen Cushman
Download Rodzina fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Karen Cushman
  • ISBN:
    044041993X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0440419938
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yearling; Reprint edition (January 11, 2005)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1696 kb
  • ePUB format
    1288 kb
  • DJVU format
    1165 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    958
  • Formats:
    lit doc azw mbr


Rodzina, by Karen Cushman. p. cm. Summary: A twelve-year-old Polish American girl is boarded onto an orphan train in Chicago with fears about traveling to the West and a life of unpaid slavery.

Rodzina, by Karen Cushman. I WAS TEN YEARS OLD when Grandma Lipski^ took me to the Polish Cemetery in Chicago to show me her mother's grave. In front of a gravestone marked Rodzina Czerwinski she sat and cried, while I watched her, this tough little grandma who never cried. Many years later, when I thought about writing a book about a Polish girl from Chicago, I decided to call her Rodzina after my great-grandmother.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Rodzina Clara Jadwiga Anastazya Brodski, a strong and stubborn Polish orphan, leaves Chicago on an orphan train.

Nevada JOE, SAMMY, AND I were going on west with Miss Doctor-to the Boys' and Girls' Training School near San Francisco, where unwanted orphans were sent to learn trades.

Nevada JOE, SAMMY, AND I were going on west with Miss Doctor-to the Boys' and Girls' Training School near San Francisco, where unwanted orphans were sent to learn trades e shoemaker's shop, Miss Doctor said; I would be trained for domestic service. I'd be a kitchen drudge-a kopciuszek, Mama would say. Ironing. Probably they'll cut my hair off and make me eat mush and dry bread, I thought

Karen Cushman (born October 4, 1941)) is an American writer of historical fiction.

Karen Cushman (born October 4, 1941)) is an American writer of historical fiction. Her 1995 novel The Midwife's Apprentice won the Newbery Medal for children's literature, and her 1994 novel Catherine, Called Birdy won a Newbery Honor. She has a bachelor of arts degree in Greek and English from Stanford University. In addition, she has a master's degree in human behavior as well as a master's degree in museum studies.

Электронная книга "Rodzina", Karen Cushman Karen Cushman was born in Chicago, Illinois and lives now on Vashon Island west of Seattle, Washington. in human behavior and one in museum studies.

Электронная книга "Rodzina", Karen Cushman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Rodzina" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Karen Cushman was born in Chicago, Illinois and lives now on Vashon Island west of Seattle, Washington. Ms. Cushman has had a lifelong interest in history. She says, "I grew tired of hearing about kings, princes, generals, presidents. I wanted to know what ordinary life was like for ordinary young people in other times.

Karen Cushman is a good writer, and I will always try to read her books

Karen Cushman is a good writer, and I will always try to read her books. However this children's novel of orphans traveling west to be adopted by settlers is more about the tiresome train journey than I was expecting.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Rodzina Clara Jadwiga Anastazya Brodski, a strong and stubborn Polish orphan, leaves Chicago on an orphan train, expecting to be adopted and turned into a slave-or worse, not to be adopted at all. As the train rattles westward, she begins to develop attachments to her fellow travelers, even the frosty orphan guardian, and to accept the idea that there might be good homes for orphans-maybe even for a big, combative Polish girl.

By Karen Cushman Read by Becky Ann Baker. Karen Cushman’s first book, Catherine, Called Birdy, was a Newbery Honor winner and her second, The Midwife’s Apprentice, was awarded the Newbery Medal

By Karen Cushman Read by Becky Ann Baker. By Karen Cushman Read by Becky Ann Baker. Category: Audiobooks. Karen Cushman’s first book, Catherine, Called Birdy, was a Newbery Honor winner and her second, The Midwife’s Apprentice, was awarded the Newbery Medal. She was an adjunct professor in Museum Studies at John F. Kennedy University for 11 years, before retiring t. ore about Karen Cushman.

In 1881, 12-year-old Rodzina Clara Jadwiga Anastazya Brodski wishes she didn’t have to board the orphan train in Chicago

ISBN13:9780544540293. Release Date:February 2016. Publisher:HMH Books for Young Readers.

In 1881, 12-year-old Rodzina Clara Jadwiga Anastazya Brodski wishes she didn’t have to board the orphan train in Chicago. But she has no home, no family, and no choice. Rodzina doesn’t believe the orphans are on their way out West to be adopted by good families. She’s sure they will become slaves to strangers. Anyway, who would ever adopt a large, tough, stubborn girl of Polish origin? As the train heads west, all Rodzina has is a small suitcase and her family memories from the past. Will Rodzina ever step off the train to find the family that deep in her heart she’s searching for?

Simple
How did I not know the history of the children's orphan trains in the United States? I found myself fascinated all the way through, not just with the events of this journey, but also with the delightful characters.

Rodzina Brodski, a 12-year-old Polish orphan girl from Chicago, and two dozen other children were put on an orphan train headed west in the hope that they could be adopted by good families. Not every family wants a child to love and cuddle, however. In the early 1880s, westerners were mostly hard-scrabble ranchers, farmers and miners, who needed a hard worker with a strong back, not another mouth to feed.

The story of Rodzina, as she grows from grouchy and sad to a more hopeful and independent girl is one that evolves, as she faces two women who want her for her labor, and later, a man who wants her to replace his dying wife.

This is my favorite kind of book -- spunky characters, fun to read, and along the way I learn something!
Recommended for girls 9-12 -- and I enjoyed it, too!
Ranterl
This is not my favorite of Karen Cushman's books-I prefer the medieval ones, but is still a good book for girls. I received the book quickly and it was well packed.
Spilberg
A gaggle of orphans leaves Chicago, bound west toward slavery or worse--at least that's the prevailing opinion among the children. Rodzina, a twelve year old Polish immigrant who lost her family to fire and illness, narrates this journey with humor, candor, sadness, and humanity. As the miles click away, we learn something of the time and places through which we are taken. In the tradition of Lucy Whipple, Catherine Called Birdy, and Matilda Bone, Rodzina is another example of a strong girl making sense of her desperate situation. This book is perfect for children in grades four through nine, and for fans of children's literature no matter what age. Karen Cushman is a gifted storyteller.
Vathennece
Rodzina, a young orphan heading west on the orphan train may not be cute and young enough to be chosen like so many orphans who find new homes along the way, but her courage and her strength of character are unforgettable. The story is well written and will keep one reading. It is also a great way to learn about the way many orphans were shipped out West, some to be adopted, others to work for their keep, a time that is well documented in New York City's history.
Mardin
Karen Cushman does her research, uses imagination and empathy and comes up with a wonderful, engaging. and informative narrative (for any age).
Xava
As a Polish person, I know - without a doubt - that no Polish parents in the 19th century would have named their daughter Rodzina. It would have been unheard of, as children were all named after saints. In the prologue Cushman claims to have done research; but if that were the case, she would certainly have discovered this basic fact.

This may seem like a small thing to some, but it really took me out of the story, which is unfortunate. It is otherwise a good solid tale, centered upon a strong protagonist set in an intriguing situation - one of the famous 1870s Orphan Trains, taking parentless city children out West in search of new families.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
The year is 1881. Rodzina Brodski, a Polish-born Chicago girl, had a happy, reasonably comfortable life with her parents and little brothers, until a series of accidents and illnesses left her orphaned and alone. Against her will, she finds herself packed onto one of the "orphan trains" that take children west to find new families. Rodzina is sure she will be sold into slavery. Big, tough, stubborn, and not especially pretty, she finds it hard to believe anyone would want to give her a loving home. At first, she closes her heart to the possibilities - but somehow, along the way, she starts to open up to the other children on the train, their gruff and enigmatic caretaker, and eventually the possibility of a new beginning.

Rodzina's toughness makes her a hard character to like in the beginning, but as the reader gets to know her - and as she learns to love again - she quickly becomes endearing for her honest voice and hidden vulnerability, while compelling admiration for her strength and resilience. Small moments of humor keep the novel from becoming bleak even in Rodzina's moments of despair. The supporting characters come across as plenty annoying in the beginning, but they grow on the reader even as they grow on the heroine.

This is a simple story, nothing unusual or surprising, but Cushman's meticulous attention to detail brings the past vividly alive. Although the orphan trains have been made the subject of children's fiction before (Isabelle Holland's lovely "Journey Home," for instance, and a whole series by Joan Lowery Nixon), this fascinating part of American history has received far less attention than might be expected for such an inherently interesting and dramatic topic, and this gritty, realistic, but ultimately warm novel may well delight even those young readers who don't normally gravitate to historical fiction.