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Download Death of the Iron Horse fb2

by Paul Goble
Download Death of the Iron Horse fb2
History
  • Author:
    Paul Goble
  • ISBN:
    0689716869
  • ISBN13:
    978-0689716867
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Aladdin; Reprint edition (March 31, 1993)
  • Pages:
    32 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1934 kb
  • ePUB format
    1903 kb
  • DJVU format
    1235 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    513
  • Formats:
    lrf lit docx doc


Paul Goble has received wide acclaim for his magnificent books, including Buffalo Woman, Dream Wolf, Her Seven Brothers, and the winner of the 1979 Caldecott Medal, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses.

Paul Goble has received wide acclaim for his magnificent books, including Buffalo Woman, Dream Wolf, Her Seven Brothers, and the winner of the 1979 Caldecott Medal, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses.

New York : Aladdin Books ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International.

Cheyenne Indians - History - Juvenile fiction, Cheyenne Indians - History - Fiction, Indians of North America - History - Fiction, Railroads - History - Fiction, Cheyenne Indians. New York : Aladdin Books ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International. inlibrary; printdisabled;. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

Paul Goble (27 September 1933 – 5 January 2017) was a British-American writer and illustrator of children's books, especially Native American stories. His book The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses won a Caldecott Medal in 1979. Goble was born in Haslemere, England. He grew up in Oxford where his father was a harpsichord maker, and his mother a professional musician.

The illustrations are drawn by t Death of the Iron Horse (1993) tells about . The illustrations are drawn by the author, Paul Goble, who is an Englishman born in 1933 that specializes in writing children's books with Native American themes.

The illustrations are drawn by t Death of the Iron Horse (1993) tells about the coming of the Union Pacific freight train that fulfills the prophecy of a Cheyenne elder. The imagery Goble provides is a nod to the traditional Native American artistic style, with flat figures, historically accurate costuming, and vibrant colors.

Overview: The title of Paul Goble’s book Death of the Iron Horse alone is an interpretation of how the Cheyenne . As this prophecy is coming true a group of young Cheyenne warriors embark on a mission to destroy the Iron Horse.

Overview: The title of Paul Goble’s book Death of the Iron Horse alone is an interpretation of how the Cheyenne Native Americans felt about westward expansion. The Iron Horse is their description of the train. The tone of the book is mythical. It begins with a prophecy that the white men would destroy the Cheyenne’s way of life.

The Iron Horse was coming. Thundering and panting and breathing black smoke, it was a fearsome thing

The Iron Horse was coming. Thundering and panting and breathing black smoke, it was a fearsome thing. Illustrated by Mr. Goble's usual beautiful pictures, this is the dramatic story of the time that a group of plains Indian warriors fought against the invasion of the "iron horse", or steam train. The Cheyenne people had never seen a steam locomotive before, and it terrified them. Would it come right over the hill, into their camp, just as the relentless soldiers and white settlers had done before? Powerful words and pictures tell the true story of August 7, 1867 - the only time an "Iron Horse" was derailed by Native Americans. It is a tale of courage and pride and of a people caught up in an unequal struggle to preserve their sacred way of life.

In an act of bravery and defiance against the white men encroaching on their territory in 1867, a group of young Cheyenne braves derail and raid a freight train.

Death of the iron horse. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Death of the iron horse from your list? Death of the iron horse. In an act of bravery and defiance against the white men encroaching on their territory in 1867, a group of young Cheyenne braves derail and raid a freight train. LC copy has dust jacket.

Other Books You Might Like. A lesson on the Plains Native Americans that integrates social studies and reading, using these four Paul Goble books. Related Book Resources. Buffalo Woman, Death of the Iron Horse, Her Seven Brothers, and Star Boy Lesson Plan.

The Iron Horse was coming...Thundering and panting and breathing black smoke, it was a fearsome thing. The Cheyenne people had never seen a steam locomotive before, and it terrified them. Would it come right over the hill, into their camp, just as the relentless soldiers and white settlers had done before? Powerful words and pictures tell the true story of August 7, 1867 -- the only time an "Iron Horse" was derailed by Native Americans. It is a tale of courage and pride and of a people caught up in an unequal struggle to preserve their sacred way of life.

Ynye
I think it is so great that achildren's author would take the time to write about such an unknown (to white culture) event!. The Cheyene and Lakota shouldl have done more of this kind of thing!
Opilar
I read this book when I was a kid and was happy to find it for my boys. We will keep this for their grandchildren.
Clodebd
My train-obsessed three year old snagged this book off of the library shelf because of the picture on the cover. I quickly discovered that the story had little to do with trains, and much to do with the conflict with American Indians in the 1800s. Before I wrestled the book from his hands, my son was treated to, very nice, illustrations of the burning of an Indian village, complete with massacred Indians, and a derailed train with an arrow-ridden corpse sprawled on the ground beside. So, before handing this book to your child, take a few minutes to ensure that you are comfortable with the subject matter, always good advice, and prepare to explain what they read/read.

Beyond the concerns with content in a children's book, you should also be aware that the author presents one very particular take on historical events. Which is certainly his right. He rightfully laments the treatment of native Americans, yet seems to celebrate the violence they committed (how this is not both racist and vengeful is unclear to me). In other words, before allowing your child to read this book, prepare to discuss this conflict with your children. If you don't believe your child is prepared to understand these issues, don't give them the book!
Rollers from Abdun
I am own all of Goble's books. My son and I fell in love with his stories and illustrations. He has since grown up and we have given away a plethora of his books, but these are keepsakes that I will always own. I would never give them away. I absolutely love them.
Carrot
Illustrated by Mr. Goble's usual beautiful pictures, this is the dramatic story of the time that a group of plains Indian warriors fought against the invasion of the "iron horse", or steam train.
SmEsH
I put this in with our Oregon Trail/westward expansion materials, even though it is a few decades removed from the 1840-1850's.

The backgrounds show the Nebraska prairie and Chimney Rock.

This book is an important one for understanding (a tiny bit of) the resistance to America's westward expansion.