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by William Steig
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Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Author:
    William Steig
  • ISBN:
    0062050788
  • ISBN13:
    978-0062050786
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harpercollins Childrens Books; 1st edition (1996)
  • Pages:
    32 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1823 kb
  • ePUB format
    1314 kb
  • DJVU format
    1144 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    495
  • Formats:
    mobi azw mobi rtf


William Steig /ˈstaɪɡ/ (November 14, 1907 – October 3, 2003) was an American cartoonist, sculptor, and, in his later life, an illustrator and writer of children's books.

William Steig /ˈstaɪɡ/ (November 14, 1907 – October 3, 2003) was an American cartoonist, sculptor, and, in his later life, an illustrator and writer of children's books. Best known for the picture books Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, Abel's Island, and Doctor De Soto, he was also the creator of Shrek!, which inspired the film series of the same name.

William Steig's "The Toy Brother" takes us back to medieval England, where brothers Charles and Yorick spend their time in the time-honored way of figuring out ways to annoy each other (some things never change). When one of them gets into their father's magic potions, all heck breaks loose and there are problems a-plenty-compounded by the fact that their parents are away for several days at a family wedding. The brothers come to an understanding on their own-a nice touch-not with the help of their parents or any other characters.

The Toy Brother book. When Sylvester, Farmer William Steig was born in New York City in 1907. In a family where every member was involved in the arts, it was not surprising that Steig became an artist. He published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968, embarking on a new and very different career. Steig's books reflect his conviction that children want the security of a devoted family and friends.

List Price Books related to The Toy Brother.

Yorick Bede has always considered his younger brother, Charles, a first-rate pain in the pants, and Charles thinks the same of Yorick. Now suddenly Charles is the big brother. Books related to The Toy Brother.

The Toy Brother is another delightful picture book tale from William Steig. The prolific Steig keeps the Dark Ages light with his penchant for non sequiturs and colorful if challenging words (such as "alackaday" and ). Connect with the author. Watercolors of chunky wooden furniture, heavy eating utensils and knee-length tunics set the tone for this costume comedy. The brothers come to an understanding on their own-a nice touch-not with the help of their parents or. any other characters.

Written and illustrated by William Steig. Michael di Capua Books.

When the medieval parents of two boys leave the oldest in charge for a few days we learn about brotherly love, and that some things never change. Written and illustrated by William Steig.

ISBN 10: 0062050788 ISBN 13: 9780062050786. Publisher: Harpercollins Childrens Books, 1996.

William Steig (November 14, 1907 – October 3, 2003) was a prolific American cartoonist, sculptor and, late in life, an illustrator and writer of popular children's books. Best known for the picture books Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, he was also the creator of Shrek!, which inspired the film series of the same name.

An apprentice alchemist finds that his despised kid brother is the only one who can help him when he concocts a potion which makes him the size of a peanut.

BlessСhild
This book was unbearable AND almost unreadable! The author's substitution of uncommon words for common ones seemed forced. And ultimately problematic, as it made you fumble around with the words and lose the flow of the storyline.

I can appreciate that adults would like this book (and give it positive reviews) but I'm curious what a teacher of a class of 6year olds would say. Also, the name-calling between the brothers was just totatlly unnecessary, and yet again, quite odd: one was "Goosewit."

For me, all that plus the overly simplistic illustrations, means this won't make it into our home library anytime soon. Description says for 3+ but my 4yo was L.O.S.T! At one point he said, "Um, mom. Excuse me for interupting. But, can you tell me what's going on? I just don't get it." Poor kiddo! I responded, "That's okay, sweety. Mommy doesn't either" and put it back in the library bag :-D
Exellent
William Steig joined here the delightful tone of his earlier children's books to the inventiveness found in his New Yorker cartoons.
Yorick, the older of these two medieval boys, had notions of surpassing his father at alchemy, and hoped someday to turn donkey's dung into gold. Charles on the other hand preferred chasing chickens, poking in anthills and arguing with the family goat.
Naturally, when their parents traveled to a distant wedding, Yorick got into some solution. "Yes goosewit," he told his brother, after transmogrificating himself, "I invented a new potion. But I tasted it and za-zing! I was no bigger than a cockroach."
Charles found his older brother's new size satisfyingly real as peas and beans and built him a new pint-sized house, but when it started to hail, he realized that Yorick would always be in danger. He could easily drown in a bucket of milk, be eaten by a cat, seriously injured by a field mouse or stepped on by a donkey.
Steig mixed unusual words with more unusual ingredients--putting gadzooks and flabbergasted with borage, betony, camphor, sauerkraut and dainty pies. The hysterical result no doubt humored the Bede minikins. It is bound to enchant your own tikes as well, especially if they're prone to fight now and then. Alyssa A. Lappen
Nakora
William Steig's "The Toy Brother" takes us back to medieval England, where brothers Charles and Yorick spend their time in the time-honored way of figuring out ways to annoy each other (some things never change). When one of them gets into their father's magic potions, all heck breaks loose and there are problems a-plenty--compounded by the fact that their parents are away for several days at a family wedding.
The brothers come to an understanding on their own--a nice touch--not with the help of their parents or any other characters. But of course, it's all even better once their parents arrive home.
One of my very favorite things about William Steig's books--aside from, well, everything--is that he treats kids like smart people. That's different from treating them like grown-ups, which he doesn't do--but he uses uncommon words and phrases with great abandon, figuring that what kids don't pick up from context they can jolly well look up in a dictionary. Bully for him! The result is a book that has zing, and the usual terrific Steig illustrations. So much fun, whether or not the child you're reading to has an annoying brother!
monotronik
The story background here should provide an imaginative tale...a medieval family, alchemy, and a shrinking brother. But the actual story line won't amuse children from the age of 4 - 8. The problem with the book is a somewhat mean-spirited story and it's rather dull unfolding. Some other reviewers on this page were amused and even flattered by Steig's 'respect' for his audience's intellectual curiosity insofar as he uses an advanced vocabulary in the story. Permit me to ask you. Would the early reader in your family go to the dictionary when he encounters 'big' words on each page? Would his attention hold, if 50% of the book had to be explained by an adult because it was obscure to him... and uninteresting besides?
Saithinin
This is a perfectly competent story about what happens when one brother shrinks himself when their parents are away. Wacky Hijinks Ensue!

Except I didn't find it very interesting myself. The storyline is fairly realistic (well, once you get over the magic), but it just didn't draw me in. And so it goes, we can't all be fans of every book.
nailer
How many of us had older siblings that ignored us and thought we were pests? And how many of us had younger siblings that were pests? This is a great story of two brothers in this situation. But in the end find mutual respect for each other. William Steig's fairy tale magic leaves children wanting this story read over and over again.
JUST DO IT
This book is one of my favorites to read to my 2 year old son. The language is funny and isn't dumbed down. He loves it and so do I.