Download Saving Sky fb2

by Diane Stanley
Download Saving Sky fb2
Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Author:
    Diane Stanley
  • ISBN:
    0061239054
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061239052
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperCollins; 1 edition (August 24, 2010)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1891 kb
  • ePUB format
    1283 kb
  • DJVU format
    1857 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    589
  • Formats:
    doc azw mbr lit


Saving Sky Diane Stanley for Rosemary Brosnan This conflict, which threatens us today, is unlike anything America has ever faced before. Saving Sky. Diane Stanley. for Rosemary Brosnan.

Saving Sky Diane Stanley for Rosemary Brosnan This conflict, which threatens us today, is unlike anything America has ever faced before. It is a Shadow War, against an unseen army. This conflict, which threatens us today, is unlike anything America has ever faced before. These killers do not attack us openly, dressed in the uniform of an enemy nation.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Although the country is at war, terrorists strike at random, and widespread rationing is in effect.

Diane Stanley one had been. The feed room was ten feet square, two and a half plywood panels per wall. The half panel, attached to the corner stud with self-closing hinges, would serve as the entry door to the hiding place. There would have to be a handle on the inside, for pulling the door open, as well as a bolt for fastening it shut. But Luke couldn’t attach them with nails

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. by Diane Stanley.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The country is at war, terrorists strike at random, widespread rationing is in effect, and the power grid is down. But thirteen-year-old Sky Brightman is remarkably untouched by it all. She lives off the grid on sixty acres of rural New Mexico ranch land with chores to do and horses to ride and no television or internet to bring disturbing news into her family's adobe house. Sky's schoolmates think she's a little weird.

Although the country is at war, terrorists strike at random, and widespread rationing is in effect, thirteen-year-old Sky Brightman is remarkably untouched by it all. She and her family live off the grid on sixty acres of rural New Mexico ranch land with chores to do, horses to ride, and no television or internet to bring disturbing news into their home.

A book trailer we created for "Saving Sky" by Diane Stanley. This book has been nominated for the 2013 Oklahoma Sequoyah Intermediate Book Award. A book trailer we created for "Saving Sky" by Diane Stanley.

Saving Sky by Diane Stanley. In an America that has suffered continual terrorist attacks since seventh-grader Sky stands up for what is right and helps a classmate of Middle Eastern descent, although doing so places her. 10 Empowering Books for Girls(ages

Saving Sky by Diane Stanley. 10 Empowering Books for Girls(ages. List of books that empower girls. FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Diane Stanley (born December 27, 1943) is an American children's author and illustrator. Stanley was born in Abilene, Texas

Diane Stanley (born December 27, 1943) is an American children's author and illustrator. Stanley was born in Abilene, Texas. She earned her bachelor's degree from Trinity University and her M. A. in medical illustration from Johns Hopkins University College of Medicine. She has worked as a medical illustrator, a graphic designer for Dell Publishing, and an art director for G. P. Putnam's Sons, winning three design awards from the New York Book Show.

The country is at war, terrorists strike at random, widespread rationing is in effect, and the power grid is down. But thirteen-year-old Sky Brightman is remarkably untouched by it all. She lives off the grid on sixty acres of rural New Mexico ranch land with chores to do and horses to ride and no television or internet to bring disturbing news into her family's adobe house. Sky's schoolmates think she's a little weird.

Then a string of mysterious arrests begins, and her new friend, Kareem, becomes a target. Sky is finally forced to confront the world in all its complexity. Summoning her considerable courage and ingenuity, she takes a stand against injustice. With humor, hope, and fierce determination, she proves that even a child can change the world.


Tat
This book is about a girl who is living in New Mexico during the 9/11 terrorist attacks. I adored this book and recommend it to boys and girls who are ages 11+. I say 11+ because I'm 11 and I think that it fit my age perfectly:)
Early Waffle
With the strong shift in our country today toward fear of different nationalities and cultures, this book is an extremely timely read. I wish every American would read this book, and especially the climactic ending where Sky reads the essay. (That doesn't sound too exciting, the way I've just written it, but believe me, it is! I won't say more as I don't want this review to be a "spoiler".) Other reviewers have ably summarized the basic setting and plot, so I'll just note that the author, Diane Stanley, lives in Santa Fe and does an excellent job of capturing the local atmosphere - the seasons, the land, the natural beauty, the whole "feel" of a Western ranch in the wilderness. She gets all sorts of little details "right". The escape during the snow storm to Petroglyph Cave is magnificent. Diane Stanley is an excellent story teller, balancing drama with humor, and serious issues with playful irony.

Speaking of irony, I believe this book contains a gentle satire on New Age practices. The parents have created an alternate world within their isolated ranch, a very wholesome and good world, but one in which their children are growing up in a sheltered bubble, out of touch with the nitty-gritty realities of what’s going on in the world around them. They teach the children to deal with any anxieties they may feel from contact with these outside realities by engaging in self-comforting New Age rituals and prayers which seem directed less toward a real, living God, than towards themselves: if one has succeeded in making oneself feel peaceful and calm, then somehow that will make the real problems go away. The reader sees the solipsistic futility of this, while at the same time, the author handles her characters with respect; these are genuinely good and likeable people, despite their immaturity. And the main character, Sky, eventually matures into real, effective action that can make a real difference in people’s lives. She does so even while holding onto her New Age beliefs, which I think is a realistic touch on the author’s part. We’re all a mixed bag!

A note about the age range this book is intended for: The cover flap notes that the book is for readers age 10 and up. A 10 (or even mature 9) year old would read this book with great pleasure, as an exciting and moving story. However an older reader, say 15 or older, would probably get more out of this book, and be able to read it on several different levels. It could generate excellent classroom discussions. I’m an older adult, and am on my third re-reading since the book came out in 2012. (It’s in our Santa Fe public library, and now I’ve just purchased two used copies on Amazon – one for myself and one for a school teacher friend.) Do read this book!
heart of sky
This book couldn't possibly be more relevant! My nine year old daughter just finished reading it, and said it was her very favorite book. One of the unique lessons that the author so beautifully illustrated with the main character, is the concept of understanding "what is within our area of control, and what is not." That is a powerful concept for both children and adults to grasp. Especially children, because their really is so little in their universe that they fully control (without a parent, teacher, caregiver).
Sky, the main character, struggles deeply to find the courage to stand up to racism and bullying; themes that sadly are quite timely in today's society. The author makes a decision at the end of the book not to neatly "wrap up" the ending in a traditionally way. It is because of her choice to leave an open ending, that even young readers understanding the resounding moral of the story; You can't control other people, but you can control your own actions. Courage comes in many different forms, the main character found her voice of courage at the end of the book. As a parent, I found the author's choice of ending quite courageous too.
Akinonris
Saving Sky takes place in an alternate future following 9/11. In Diane Stanley's gripping tale, the attacks keep coming and young Sky is raised in a world where schools have safe rooms, fuel is in short supply and schedules are formed around red alert days. Sky and her parents are better off than most, living on a farm in New Mexico powered by solar panels, living off their own gardens and turning their backs on things such as computers and televisions. Sky is happy with her family and her home until the attacks begin to escalate and she is brought face to face with racial prejudice in the form of an encounter with an Arab American family at a Home Depot. This serves not only as her awakening to the growing ugliness of her world but also to her growing desire to fight injustice and to find her own courage.

The story here is a good one; fast paced and easy to read. It will hold lots of appeal to reluctant middle school readers with a fondness for dystopian fiction. As an older reader, I found myself often wanting more. I wanted more character development, more explanations of Sky's family belief systems which were really quite beautiful, and more explanations of the world situation. Since this story is told through the eyes of a twelve year old, it is necessarily very focused. The crises occuring in the outer world are merely a backdrop to Sky's growing confidence in herself and the role she can play in the world around her. In the end, this turns out not to be so much a sci-fi story as a coming of age story in the most extreme of circumstances. It is an effective examination of courage, and will prompt lots of discussion, as the parallels with today's world are very apparent. This book is a rousing condemnation of racism in all it's forms and succeeds on many levels. The writing is wonderful, and aside from my desire to know more of the story, I found it to be a riveting read. This is a solid recommend for grades 6-9.