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Download The Period Book: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up (But Need to Know) fb2

by Debbie Palen,Karen Gravelle
Download The Period Book: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up (But Need to Know) fb2
Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Author:
    Debbie Palen,Karen Gravelle
  • ISBN:
    0802774784
  • ISBN13:
    978-0802774781
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Walker Childrens; 2 edition (March 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1834 kb
  • ePUB format
    1541 kb
  • DJVU format
    1412 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    997
  • Formats:
    lrf doc lit doc


At 11, before they even need The Period Book, and at 13, when that tidbit about the fingertip's worth of sperm causing impregnation . Covers just about everything a preteen girl needs to know about her body and cultural norms.

At 11, before they even need The Period Book, and at 13, when that tidbit about the fingertip's worth of sperm causing impregnation could be vital, life-changing information.

The Period Book: A Girl's. has been added to your Cart. Please feed your child do not measure or weight them they need to be free to grow and develop into adults

The Period Book: A Girl's. Karen Gravelle is the author of Bloomsbury's bestselling nonfiction titles The Period Book, What's Going on Down There?, and The Driving Book. She lives on the eastern shore of Virginia. Debbie Palen is a professional illustrator from Cleveland, Ohio. Please feed your child do not measure or weight them they need to be free to grow and develop into adults. 55 people found this helpful.

The Period Book book . The essential guidebook for every girl. The Period Book is a reassuring must-read for every girl about to have her period, and every parent wishing to prepare a daughter for this important milestone. With more than 300,000 copies sold, The Period Book stands out from the pack by specifically addressing younger girls. And with eleven now the average age at which girls get/ The.

Author(s): Karen Gravelle, Debbie Palen (Illustrations). The Period Book: Everything You Don't Want to Ask (But Need to Know). Published March 1st 1996 by Walker Childrens. ISBN: 0802777368 (ISBN13: 9780802777362). Hardcover, 128 pages. Author(s): Karen Gravelle, Jennifer Gravelle.

THE DRIVING BOOK: Everything New Drivers Need to Know but Don't Know to As.

THE DRIVING BOOK: Everything New Drivers Need to Know but Don't Know to Ask. An outstanding, common-sense guide also humorous and appealing. School Library Journal. School Library Journal In a friendly, chatty manner, Gravelle explains the external and internal changes of puberty. She gives girls just enough practical details to know what to expect and how to cope with periods. Questions about big and little matters are answered in the same reassuring, sisterly vein.

Parents need to know that The Period Book: A Girl's Guide to Growing . For kids who love stories about girls and growing up.

Parents need to know that The Period Book: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up offers clear, helpful information for girls about the ways they're changing physically and emotionally during puberty. Author Karen Gravelle helps girls and their families grow more comfortable talking about periods, pubic hair, and pimples without blushing in this friendly, compassionate update of her sex ed book.

Karen Gravelle; Jennifer Gravelle; Debbie Palen. Complete with charming and informative interior illustrations, The Period Book is a trusty friend that can help girls feel confident about this new phase of their lives. Get to Know Us. Our Company. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Karen Gravelle; Jennifer Gravelle; Debbie Palen. Bloomsbury USA. Book Format.

Girls can have many questions about puberty, including getting their periods. com/?book 161963662X.

written by Karen Gravelle and Jennifer Gravelle, illustrated by Debbie Palen. Complete with charming and informative interior illustrations, THE PERIOD BOOK is a trusty friend that can help girls feel confident about this new phase of their lives

written by Karen Gravelle and Jennifer Gravelle, illustrated by Debbie Palen. The Period Book: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up written by Karen Gravelle and Jennifer Gravelle, illustrated by Debbie Palen.

A more in depth book about what to expect when you start your period - body changes, what it feels like to bleed, what to expect at an annual exam, etc. These 7 Sex Ed Products Will Change Your Relationship With Your Kid Forever.

What is my period exactly? Do I need to see a doctor? What does it feel like to wear a pad? What if I get my period at school?

Karen Gravelle and her fifteen-year-old niece, Jennifer Gravelle, have written a down-to-earth and practical book that answers any questions you might have about your period, from what it is and what it feels like, to how to choose pads and tampons, to how to talk to your parents about it. The Period Book will help guide you through all the physical, emotional, and social changes that come with your period, as well as related issues like dealing with pimples, mood swings, and new expectations from friends and family. Debbie Palen's funny and sympathetic cartoons ease the confusion and exasperation you might feel, and celebrate the new sense of power and maturity that your period can bring. Perfect for sharing, The Period Book is a trusty friend that can help you feel happy and confident about this new phase of your life.


Mardin
My 12 year old daughter just started her period this summer. She was away from home visiting family, which makes me sad that I missed the first one. I went online that night and found this book. I read the reviews, and the comments about the content being inappropriate. One reviewer mentioned that she was appalled by a section that informed the reader that you could get pregnant if semen is introduced into the vagina by any means, such as a finger. While it might make us uncomfortable as parents to think about our sweet girls doing anything of the sort, the fact is that it happens. I for one would rather have her know the risks and avoid them, than keep her blissfully ignorant while she ends up pregnant because she "didn't know". They say you're supposed to have "the talk" by the time they are 8 years old now as it is. Now that she's able to get pregnant (cuz let's face it thats what periods are for) I want her to know. Keeping her in the dark isn't going to do her any favors, and telling her the truth won't hurt her.
So anyways I bought the book and had it overnighted to her at my mom's house. My mom said when she handed her the book she rolled her eyes and was like "Oh God". But she sat down to read, and did not put it down again until she had read it cover to cover. She told my mom, that was a REALLY good book, it had a lot of good information in it. It also has a little log in the back for her to track her cycle.
I'm comfortable in my choice to get her the book. Now I know she knows, and what she knows is the truth and not hearsay from other teenage girls or boys. You know they talk about it right? And they act on it younger and younger these days? Don't you want them informed?
xander
I feel very compelled to write a review after reading the top-rated comments by panicked mothers. Here is my story:

I read this book when I was 10. I borrowed it from my friend, whose mom was a bit more hands-off than mine. I remember using it with my girlfriend, and a mirror, to find where our vaginas were. I didn't use it to masturbate. It didn't make me lose my virginity earlier. It just gave me the kind of no-nonsense ILLUSTRATED, not photographed, depictions of what I had to expect in the coming years. I loved this book because instead of trying to shelter me, it gave me all the best information and helped me make well-informed decisions.

I felt compelled to review this book not only because I thought it was great, and memorable FIFTEEN YEARS later. But also because these panicked mothers, who are worried about their daughters being "too young" to learn about these things, clearly haven't been to a middle school in recent years. Children--tweens--are having sex. At 11, before they even need The Period Book, and at 13, when that tidbit about the fingertip's worth of sperm causing impregnation could be vital, life-changing information. That was never me, but hey! I read the Period Book when I was 10. So I knew better...

So don't hide this book from your kids. Because they're almost not kids. And even as kids, behind your very backs, they're probably doing adult things. This book promotes body-literacy; it doesn't change the innate nature of your girls, or negate the moral compass you've instilled in them. As parents, don't you want to give your child THE BEST CHANCE to make good decisions? If so, get her this book.
Hono
I liked it a lot. Got it for my 9 year old niece.

The only drawbacks are that, because it is meant for a young audience and meant to reassure and educate without scaring, it does not cover two things I was hoping for.

It only very briefly touched upon non-heterosexual feelings, and while it did so positively, it was little more than a passing comment. Gender and sexuality fall on a spectrum and can be fluid, I felt it needed a more in depth take on that. But still, it’s not necessarily negative on the subject, rather than lacking.

Same issue with health concerns. Endometriosis runs in my family, and reproductive disorders are not uncommon among women in the US. While it touched on it briefly, the book does not adequately tell young girls how to differentiate between regular menstruel symptoms and those that are not, and when to be concerned. While I understand that the intent is not to scare, the first sign that something is wrong is pain. And a young girl complaining of pain that she is unfamiliar with, in regards to menstruation, is often dismissed as her being unused to her body’s changes. I felt that this book does not take severe menstrual pain seriously enough. And it should be taken seriously, as should young girls who say they are in extreme pain.

Aside from those two points, this book was wonderful and informative.
Roru
I bought this book for my 10 year old. She's super embarrassed about anything period related. I slipped it under her pillow and she yelled at me when she found it haha. I'll probably never know what she thought of it, because periods are apparently mythical to her, but- I think this book is great.
Ber
Reading to my 9 year old. It’s just the right amount of information for her. We read the Care and Keeping of you for Younger Girls two years ago. This book repeats that info (which I think is good) and adds more information to continue the conversations we’ve already started. If you haven’t been having conversations with your daughter about her body yet, you may not be ready to go to the detail this book does. It’ll be a great resource when you are.
Globus
Covers just about everything a preteen girl needs to know about her body and cultural norms. Describes and advises in easy-to-understand language, with a very appropriate tone.
Phalaken
Great book for girls anticipating their first period and in general for learning about the changes in the body. I used this book as an addition to the "birds and the bees" talk for my 11 yr old daughter. This book is a great reference and visual tool for girls that want to know about their bodies and upcoming changes. Very informative, easy to read. Would recommend for all growing girls!
Great book for lil girls. Got this for my daughter to prepare her, Slightly funny illustrations but great read and level for the younger ladies