Download Francie fb2

by Karen English
Download Francie fb2
Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Author:
    Karen English
  • ISBN:
    1439585571
  • ISBN13:
    978-1439585573
  • Genre:
  • Subcategory:
    Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1438 kb
  • ePUB format
    1540 kb
  • DJVU format
    1992 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    520
  • Formats:
    lrf docx azw rtf


Miss Beach nodded at us, then rose and let him spill from her lap. Hurry and round up the linens, Francie, she said, squinting at the sky.

Miss Beach nodded at us, then rose and let him spill from her lap. I feel a storm coming up. Mama and I headed out back, Mama to get the tubs ready and me to take the back stairs up to the rooms. I started with Mr. Ivory’s room, gathered his sheets, sniffed some of his colognes and hair ointments, and then made my way to my teacher Miss Lafayette’s room. I liked her. Sometimes she left books on her bed for me to borrow and then discuss with her later.

Francie is a 2000 Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book.

Francie lives with her mother and younger brother, Prez, in rural Alabama, where all three work and wait. Francie's father is trying to get settled in Chicago so he can move his family up North. Unfortunately, he's made promises he hasn't kept, and Francie painfully learns that her dreams of starting junior high school in an integrated urban classroom will go unfulfilled. Francie is a 2000 Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book.

Karen English compresses worlds of feeling and experience into every sequence of her first novel, offering .

Karen English compresses worlds of feeling and experience into every sequence of her first novel, offering readers not just a good diversion but an opportunity to try on someone else's skin. Characterization is evenhanded and believable, while place and time envelop readers. The message that one must rise out of oppression and actively seek a better life is a good on.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Francie's smooth-flowing, well-paced narration is gently assisted by just the right touch of the vernacular. Francie lives with her mother and younger brother, Prez, in rural Alabama, where all three work and wait.

Mama didn’t get back from Auntie’s until just before dinnertime. Her face was as readable as a stone. She walked over to the pantry and got out a jar of pickled peaches and set it on the table. up for dinner, she said

Mama didn’t get back from Auntie’s until just before dinnertime. up for dinner, she said. I let out the breath I’d been holding when Mama went into the pantry. We ate in silence-neither Prez nor me having the nerve to ask any questions. We only spoke to ask that things be passed.

A distinctive new voice in children's fictionFrancie lives with her mother. the protagonist is Francie and the title signify her importance in the story. she is a young black girl that lives with her mom and.

Francie lives with her mother and younger brother, Prez, in rural Alabama, where all three work and wait

Francie lives with her mother and younger brother, Prez, in rural Alabama, where all three work and wait.

My book: Stay in Your Lane: Judge Karen's Guide to Living Your Best Life. Since the fall of 2008, Judge Karen has graced the airwaves as one of TVs most recognizable court show judges. Judge Karen Mills-Francis. She has a colorful and engaging style that is as distinctive as her velvet robe, vintage brooches, and her bright blonde hair. As quick to aid the helpless as she is to dismiss the fool hardy, Judge Karen confidently dishes out justice to a national television audience in her show

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Karen Franklin recounts her own past as a young addict, her struggle with the alcoholism of her parents, and ultimately her husband's and children's addictions. Lauren King, Franklin's daughter, tells of her own spiral of addiction-from marijuana and alcohol to crystal meth.

Francie lives with her mother and younger brother, Prez, in rural Alabama, where all three work and wait. Francie's father is trying to get settled in Chicago so he can move his family up North. Unfortunately, he's made promises he hasn't kept, and Francie painfully learns that her dreams of starting junior high school in an integrated urban classroom will go unfulfilled. Amid the day-to-day grind of working odd jobs for wealthy white folks on the other side of town, Francie becomes involved in helping a framed young black man to escape arrestâ?a brave gesture, but one that puts the entire black community in danger. In this vivid portrait of a girl in the pre-civil rights era South, Karen English completes Francie's world using lively vernacular and a wide array of flesh-and-blood characters.

The_NiGGa
Added this book to my classroom library as it is on the Reading Olympics list this year.
Skiletus
DID NOT ACTUALLY READ THIS BOOK. IT WAS GIVEN TO MY DAUGHTER, FRANCIE, AS A GIFT.
Rude
I do not consider this book because I just had to read it for reading Olympics. Uuuggggg. I really give it a three star.
Levion
I think this book is very good. I recommend it to others. I thought there would be more to the end, though.
Ariseym
I didn't think I would like it, and I didn't. I LOVED it! Reading Olympics people, I recommend this book!
Peles
Francie is a story about a young girl living in Noble, Alabama, with a lot more on her mind than boys or school. She goes to an all black school where she met Jessie, a heavyset boy who's almost 16 and can't read. So Francie tutors Jessie after school. They become friends when one day his father comes and pulls Jessie out of school to work. A little bit after, Jessie's dad ran off, without leaving a note or a reason. Jesse's mother had died earlier and he had no other relatives so he was all alone. And when he gets falsely accused of attempting the murder of his white boss, he's running for his life.
I disliked the book mostly because parts were hard to understand. The book also had it's moments when nothing much was happening. But the book was also good in ways. It portrayed a strong message to stand up for what you believe in. Francie was a strong hearted girl who's life was certainly not easy and this book showed what life was like for girls in that time period and how easy we have it now. Some related books would include Roll of Thunder, Hear my Cry because that book also deals with segregation and life in that era.
Daigrel
The story takes place in rural Alabama, where Francie, our 12-year-old protagonist, lives with her mother and little brother. Francie's father, who left them about a year ago, is in Chicago trying to `make it.' Francie lives in expectation of the day she will receive `the letter' from him, asking his family to join him. By this time Francie has grown skeptical of his past empty promises. One day, a new boy comes to school. He doesn't know how to read and Francie is assigned the job of teaching him. At first she seems daunted by the prospect, but soon changes her mind as she sees the boy is smart and eager to learn. Then one day he's unjustly accused of a crime. In order to help him, Francie risks everything, including her own family.

I had trouble connecting to this book. Nothing happens until around page 40, when the new boy joins Francie's class and she is asked to teach him to read. I had to force myself to keep reading, waiting for something to happen. Francie's voice is sweet but not particularly forceful or insightful enough to sustain those first several chapters without action. The story picks up in the middle but slows down and disappoints at the end. The climax somehow happens too soon, turning the event into an anticlimactic episode.

One gets the feeling that the author didn't do an outline for this story and that the events evolved as the author wrote them, giving the impression of an unbalanced structure. The ending is ambivalent. It boils down to the plot not being compelling enough, the characters not engaging enough.

Technically speaking, the writing is good, but although the story has a strong premise, I feel the execution didn't live up to its full potential. Still, this is a book that deals with important issues of prejudice and racism and for this reason has good value for classroom reading and group discussion. But read only for entertainment? I doubt the general middle reader will get past those first few chapters.

Armchair Interviews agrees.
Francie
By: Karen English
The book I read was Francie. It is about a girl who lived in Noble, Alabama. She lives with her mom and brother, Prez. Her father lives in Chicago because he si trying to earn enough money to move there with his family and have a better life. Thought out the story Francie struggles with racism. She also goes to an all African-American school. Her family is fairly poor. At school she meets a boy who can not read. She teaches him to read. Then his father appears at school and tells him he needs to go home and work on the family farm. She is determined to find him. At the end of the story everything works out fine.
This book was a reality check for me because I didn't ever realize how much blacks were persecuted after they were freed. I had herd of the civil rights movement but never really thought that hard about how much they were hurt. No days I find my self hanging out with all African-American friends! This book has a good lesson to it! Never give up and just keep trying and trying. In the end you will receive many gifts!