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Download Girls Can!: Make It Happen fb2

by Marilyn Brown,Rick Kupchella
Download Girls Can!: Make It Happen fb2
Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Author:
    Marilyn Brown,Rick Kupchella
  • ISBN:
    0972650431
  • ISBN13:
    978-0972650434
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Tristan Pub; First Edition edition (October 1, 2004)
  • Pages:
    40 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1875 kb
  • ePUB format
    1535 kb
  • DJVU format
    1981 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    785
  • Formats:
    lrf txt mobi lit


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Rick Kupchella; Marilyn Brown. Girls Can! is a powerful message to let all girls know they can be anything they want to be!

Rick Kupchella; Marilyn Brown. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Girls Can! : Make It Happen. Included in the book are the stories of Sandra Day O'Connor the first woman on the US Supreme Court; Sally Ride the first American woman astronaut; and Jackie Joyner-Kersee an Olympic medal winner in track and field. Girls Can! is a powerful message to let all girls know they can be anything they want to be! Bright and bold full-color illustrations are used throughout the book.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Girls Can!: Make It Happen

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Girls Can!: Make It Happen.

I make mistakes, I am out of control and at times hard to handle. But if you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best. In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes o. - Robert Frost. To live is the rarest thing in the world.

Rick Kupchella, author of Tell Me What We Did Today, is. .Kupchella's book does both. His prose is in rhyme and he asks silly questions that elicit responses, usually a Noooooooo, from the children.

Rick Kupchella, author of Tell Me What We Did Today, is a TV news anchor and reporter in the Twin Cities. And sharing those experiences, real or made up, is a wonderful way for parents or grandparents to connect with their children or grandchildren. And that is what Kupchella's book accomplishes. And Hanson's bright, big and bold illustrations are oh, so inviting.

The Girl Can't Help It is a 1956 musical comedy starring Jayne Mansfield in the titular role, Tom Ewell, Edmond O'Brien, Henry Jones, and Julie London.

She recently announced she was leaving BBC One drama Our Girl after four years. Her husband Mark Wright recently moved back to the UK from Los Angeles where he was working on US TV.

Listen to books in audio format . 66. Published: 2013.

Encourages girls to set their own course, knowing that they can do and be anything at all when they set their minds to it and make it so. Briefly describes how Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Sally Ride achieved their dreams.

Timberahue
My two daughters received this book from their Great Aunt and Uncle last week, and we liked it so much we decided to purchase one for my sister's two daughters. I was so surprised to see such negative reviews that I had to write a review myself. It is truly astounding that anyone could take such a positive message as this book represents and try to make it sound negative, but I suppose some people could find negative in anything.

The message we get from Kupchella's wonderful book is that each girl, throughout her life, will determine the road she will travel. She gets to choose from all the incredible possibilities out there, and it doesn't matter where she begins. I love that Kupchella mentions motivation coming from within, and being as individual as each person.

Further, the illustrations are very colorful and captivating. My four year old loves the page where Sandra is daydreaming, looking at the clouds, which represent all the boundless possibilities for her life. If you like having positive energy in your home, this book incorporates plenty of it throughout its pages.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
This is a fun story that I really enjoy reading to my girls. It has a good message and honors some great women.
Dori
Great affirmation for girls!
Weetont
This a marvelous book to build self-esteem and remind girls just how much they are capable of becoming!
Ginaun
I really like this book for my (...)girl. It talks about different ways to dream big dreams and make them happen. It's a wonderful addition to our nightime reading library!!
Doomwarden
Girls Can! By Rick Kupchella is a celebration of girls and what they can accomplish when they believe in themselves. Kupchella writes his story with the cooperation of Sandra Day O'Connor (the first female Supreme Court associate justice), Jackie Joyner-Kersee (Olympic gold medal winner) and Sally Ride (the first American woman astronaut in space).

Kupchella's book celebrates girls and all the wonderful things they can do when they are determined and put forth the energy and hard work. Through the individual stories of O'Conner, Joyner-Kersee and Ride, Kupchella inspires and challenges all girls to do what they want and to be what they want to be.

Girls Can! is an important message that must begin early and continue forever! The illustrations are colorful, bold and inviting and children will love them. This is a keeper book

Armchair Interviews says: We would love to see a book for boys also. In this day and age, we all need encouragement.
Berenn
I have mixed feelings about this book. As has been stated, the illustrations are really bright and colorful. And obviously, the women featured are amazing people. But...it does have a very simplistic (even for a kids book) heavy-handed way about it. And somehow it bugs me that the primary author is a man. No women authors available to do the job? The underlying message, though, that with determination you can do it, is a useful one for little girls.
Despite getting higher grades in school and making up 52% of college graduates, girls apparently need a little extra patronizing and mixed messages about their ability to succeed.

In three condescending, inanely written bios of famous women, we learn than Jackie Joyner-Kersee could run fast, fast, fast! Always helpful for winning gold medals, I suppose. Sandra Day O'Connor grew up on a ranch and had no idea she'd be the first female Supreme Court Justice:

"Sandra said: Find that Thing! Find that one special Thing! It's Inside you. It's where you belong!"

How about fewer exclamation points and more elucidation? My special place inside feels like indigestion right now.

Most shocking of all, future astronaut Sally Ride was ... can you believe it ... good at math. "She could add and subtract all her numbers." Really? You need arithmetic to navigate a space ship? Imagine.

My husband spotted the book's worst flaw: while the last page tells girls they're in the driver's seat, it depicts a blonde bimbo steering a red convertible, poodle at her side, in a demonstration of - what? That beauty is really what matters in the end? What's the bottom line here?