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by George Ancona
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Geography & Cultures
  • Author:
    George Ancona
  • ISBN:
    0152618759
  • ISBN13:
    978-0152618759
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harcourt Children's Books (March 30, 1994)
  • Pages:
    40 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Geography & Cultures
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1633 kb
  • ePUB format
    1316 kb
  • DJVU format
    1823 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    139
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf txt mobi


George Ancona (Ancona, George). used books, rare books and new books.

George Ancona (Ancona, George). Find all books by 'George Ancona' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'George Ancona'. Bananas: From Manolo to Margie. ISBN 9780395547878 (978-0-395-54787-8) Softcover, Houghton Mifflin School, 1990.

In lucid color photos and a simple bilingual text, the work of 77-year-old Don Ricardo (""Tio Rico""), a Mexican craftsman who ""started creating piÑatas fifteen years ago when. making felt sombreros became too hard for hi. " Beginning with a small boy delivering some of Tio Rico's materials (old newpapers and paper bags), Ancona leads into a detailed depiction of making of an unusual swan piÑata.

Piñata Maker/El Piñatero Joanna Cole writes science books Gail Gibbons Ice Cream: The Full Scoop  Spiders  The Milk Makers (selected by; Reading Rainbow)  Sunken Treasure (selected by; Reading Rainbow)  James Cross Giblin The Truth About Santa Claus.

Piñata Maker/El Piñatero Joanna Cole writes science books Gail Gibbons Ice Cream: The Full Scoop  Spiders  The Milk Makers (selected by; Reading Rainbow)  Sunken Treasure (selected by; Reading Rainbow)  James Cross Giblin The Truth About Santa Claus The Riddle of the Rosetta Stone Key to Ancient Egypt Steve Jenkins What Do You With a Tail Like This Kathryn.

This book describes how Don Ricardo, a craftsman from Ejutla de Crespo in southern Mexico, makes piñatas for all the .

This book describes how Don Ricardo, a craftsman from Ejutla de Crespo in southern Mexico, makes piñatas for all the village birthday parties and other fiestas. Told in English and Spanish by award-winning author/photographer George Ancona, El Piñatero/The Piñata Maker documents this traditional Latin American art, and offers readers a fascinating glimpse of Mexican village life. Includes a note on how to make piñatas at home. lt;/p

Usually for every picture, I use one roll of film. There are usually 50 pictures in a book, so there are 50 rolls and each roll is 36 exposures.

George Ancona (born December 19, 1929) is an American photo essayist and creator of photo-illustrated children's picture books. He was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, the son of immigrants from Mexico. He painted signs for Coney Island at "12 or 13" years and as a teenager "knew I would become an artist"  . Usually for every picture, I use one roll of film. So, for a book with 50 pictures I will take 1,800 photographs. YouTube Encyclopedic.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of George Ancona books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Pi ata Maker/El Pi atero.

The Piñata Maker or El Pinatero by George Ancona is a story about a 77 year old man named Don Ricardo. This bilingual book describes to the reader how Don Ricardo crafts piñatas in Southern Mexico. Ancona also includes very colorful illustrations which could fascinate many young readers. Overall, I believe that this is definitely a well written book that I would recommend to teachers interested in teaching about the genre of informational books.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Published March 30, 1994 by Harcourt Children's Books. There's no description for this book yet. George Ancona is an author and photographer who has published more that one hundred books, some of them bilingual. He is known for his exquisite photography and close-up looks at a variety of cultural subjects. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Books by George Ancona. Mor. rivia About El piñatero/ The.

Told in both English and Spanish by award-winning author-photographer George Ancona, The Pi ata Maker/El pi atero documents this traditional Latin American artform and includes a note on how to make pi atas at home

Told in both English and Spanish by award-winning author-photographer George Ancona, The Pi ata Maker/El pi atero documents this traditional Latin American artform and includes a note on how to make pi atas at home. A delightful introduction to the subject and a memorable glimpse of one Mexican village and its people.

Told in both English and Spanish by award-winning author-photographer George Ancona, The Piñata Maker/El piñatero documents this traditional Latin American artform and includes a note on how to make piñatas at home. “A delightful introduction to the subject and a memorable glimpse of one Mexican village and its people.”--Booklist

Uaoteowi
I bought this in order to study the traditional techniques of pinata making...so inspiring! Great photos...plus they have the English text right next to the Spanish text on each page so it's a nice teaching tool...
Ahieones
Children loved hearing how a man made a swan, and a star pinata were used in a party.
Very lively, very human.
Insanity
... and Mexico, until recently, was the scene of one of the richest 'folk cultures' of the whole world, based chiefly in its villages and small cities, Tonalá Jalisco as an example of the former and Oaxaca of the latter. Sad to say, the collapse of that folk culture is almost complete in most of Mexico, due to 'globalization' and the proximity of El Norte. But don't get me started! This is a review of a charmingly sophisticated bi-lingual book for children (over eight years old, I'd recommend) and for the adults who read to them.

Don Ricardo - Tio Rico, Uncle Dick, to the children of his village - has been hand-crafting piñatas, dance masks, and puppets for most of his 77 years. Though his work is entirely traditional, he's a genuine imaginative artist. The book shows him at work and describes some of the steps in his craftsmanship, in photographs as well as bi-lingual text. It also shows the lucky children of his village in southern Mexico -- visiting him in his shop, picking out piñatas, trying on dance masks and costumes for fiestas, celebrating their birthdays with Tio Rico and his wife as honored guests.

There may still be a few norteamericanos who don't know what a piñata is, though the custom of breaking the piñata seems to have crossed the border and been welcomed at birthday parties from Maine to Hawaii. The piñata is a hollow urn, usually of thin ceramic or papier-maché, highly decorated in fantastic forms, filmed with 'goodies' and suspended over a patio on a rope pulled up and down by an older child or adult. The birthday-party guests take turns, blind-folded, trying to break the piñata with a stick. When the piñata is broken, the 'goodies' cascade on the patio and the children scramble to pick them up. But no one looks happier to see the most gorgeous piñata shattered than the artist Tio Rico. He knows his art is perishable -- as all art is, in the end -- and he takes pleasure in the pleasure of his 'audience.' The author of this book, George Ancona, knows that some underprivileged norteamericanos might live in place where there are no piñata makers or venders, and so he includes some suggestions for makeshifting a piñata with cardboard, balloons, and crepe paper.

This book was published in 1994. The chances that Tio Rico is still crafting his folk art are scant. These days most piñatas are mass-produced -- who knows, possibly in Singapore, where the book was printed. But there's still time -- and certainly need -- for North Americans to learn to savor the humble but brilliant culture of traditional rural Mexicans, and to develop some respect for a grizzled old man with battered hands and broken teeth in somewhat shabby clothes -- just like the guy cadging odd jobs on your street corner -- who happens to have the spirit of an artist.
Steep
Tio Rico lives in a village in Oaxaca (wah-ha-kah), Mexico. He is a 77 year-old who became a pinata maker when rheumatism made it too difficult to continue his business of making sombreros.
A village boy collects newspapers and concrete sacks for Tio Rico. These he uses to fashion unusual and decorative pinatas. The process is explained by a delightful profusion of photographs which accompany the story. The author, George Ancona, also shows "puppets" which are child-size papier-mache forms worn by young folk dancers. He shows his own version of pinata formed over cardboard or balloons for those of us who cannot buy clay pots at a local market.
Children everywhere will enjoy this colorful book and be eager to try the craft. With luck, they will have patient teachers and learn some Spanish and/or English words, too! My favorite companion book is "Colors of Mexico" (isbn: #1575052164), illustrated by Janice Porter.
"THE PINATA MAKER" is a 5-star book for adults as well as children, and most appropriate for the 2003 church women's study of Mexico. Find a group of children to share this book with, and increase your enjoyment three-fold.
Pumpit
The Pinata-maker by George Ancona is An informative and fun book about Tio Rico. He takes great pride in his craft. The village boys help him by collecting newspaper to be made into paper maiche. He rewards them back by making large puppets for their parties. And he gets to attend the parties too. There is much delight that he brings to his community with his artful pinatas. I also liked that this book is bilingual, helping readers learn either English or Spanish. Photographed instead of illustrated, The Pinata-Maker has feeling of reality, of being in the dusty little village with this artistic craftsman.
Xanna
Before I retired to Mexico from teaching in Texas I used this book as a guide to classroom activities for a self-contained classroom of boys with severe behavioral problems. The response was far beyond my expectations.
In both Spanish and English Sr. Ancona tells the interesting story of Don Ricardo, an elderly pinata maker in a small Mexican village. He also includes complete instructions which allow the reader to construct his or her own pinata.
Using the construction process as a reward I was able to involve my elementary level students in a number of academic activities they had earlier resisted, as well as expanding the learning process into a number of new areas. In addition, behavior related problems decreased dramatically because participation in the reading, discussion, and pinata design and construction were based upon the completion of other academic work as well as classroom behavior and all wanted to engage in the interesting activities and discussions suggested by the book.
The ways in which this book can be used by creative teachers are many. I strongly suggest that teachers consider using this book as inspiration for a number of enjoyable and effective learning activities.
Kitaxe
i luv this book and finally made a pinata - used a balloon instead of a clay pot. this is a story book as well as a book on how authentic pinatas are made in mexico. i read it with my grandsons and they luved the story of the pinatero and enjoyed making a pinata even more. the pictures are vivid and help explain the pinata-making process. it's a great little book and so much fun, too!