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by Michael Kort
Download Russia (Nations in Transition (Facts on File)) fb2
Geography & Cultures
  • Author:
    Michael Kort
  • ISBN:
    0816030618
  • ISBN13:
    978-0816030613
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Facts on File (November 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Geography & Cultures
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1703 kb
  • ePUB format
    1512 kb
  • DJVU format
    1805 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    300
  • Formats:
    lrf azw mobi lrf


Series: Nations in Transition. Hardcover: 228 pages. This book is a good start on modern russia.

Series: Nations in Transition. It gives a decent rundown on post soviet russia to help understand how the Soviet Russia came to be. From there it goes to explain soviet russia to it's inevitable fall. Which set's the stage for Yelsten and Putin.

Kort, author of several other books on Russia and the Soviet Union, does an admirable job of condensing Russian history, from the Kievian city-states to the fall of the Soviet Union in. .Publication Date: June 1, 2004.

Kort, author of several other books on Russia and the Soviet Union, does an admirable job of condensing Russian history, from the Kievian city-states to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. Well-chosen quotes from sources as diverse as Ivan the Terrible, Tolstoy, and political prisoners personalize the readable text. Two chapters on geography and culture serve as a bridge to the book's second half, which examines politics from December 1991 through 1994.

Michael Kort was born in 1944. in history from Johns Hopkins University, and an . Russia (Nations in Transition). and P. He lives in Massachusetts. Central Asian Republics (Nations in Transition).

Nations in Transition (Facts on File)

Nations in Transition (Facts on File). By (author) Michael Kort. He is the author of The Soviet Colossus: A History of the USSR, The Columbia Guide to the Cold War, and Central Asian Republics, in Facts On File's Nations in Transition series, as well as the coauthor of Modernization and Revolution in China.

Michael Kort is professor of social science at Boston University's College of General Studies

Michael Kort is professor of social science at Boston University's College of General Studies. in history from Johns Hopkins University and his . in Russian history from New York University.

Release Date:October 1998. Publisher:Facts On File, Incorporated. It also shows how the past greatly reflects modern russian politics as to how the struggle is a long and difficult one. Easy to understand and points out how much further Russia has to go to break from the old mold's they have used since 900ad. Also, touches on historic cities and districts.

Download Russia (Nations in Transition) or any other file from Books category. The former president Boris Yeltsin signified a close proximity to the Soviet era, while the country seems to have moved on to a new national identity with the election of national leader Vladimir Putin.

Nations in Transition Series book. Hardcover, 200 pages. Published January 1st 1998 by Facts on File (first published November 1st 1995). Traces key themes of Russia's evolving experiment with. 0816037760 (ISBN13: 9780816037766).

Are you sure you want to remove Hungary (Nations in Transition (Facts on File)) from your list? . Published June 1997 by Facts on File. There's no description for this book yet.

Are you sure you want to remove Hungary (Nations in Transition (Facts on File)) from your list? Hungary (Nations in Transition (Facts on File)).

Presents a history of Russia within the former Soviet Union, as well as its current status as the Russian Federation, describing the challenges brought by its new independence.

Visonima
I picked up this book for a dollar in a used bookstore. I wanted to know more about Russian history after reading several books on specific Russian topics, including "The Sword and the Shield" (a history of Russian spying on the West), a biography of Stalin, and "The Secret Life of Kim Philby" (a profile of the Russian spy by his widow Rufa). I specifically wanted to know the answer to several questions, including:

*Why is Russian society so corrupt?
*Why did communism fail?
*Why did communism devolve into a brutal dictatorship?

This is the 1995 edition, so it could not go into any detail about the post-Yeltsin years. However, it did help me answer the above questions, especially the third. Apparently, the Mongol conquest of Russia, which lasted for two centuries, introduced them to brutal and authoritarian rule, and ever since then, they've inherited this sad tradition. After they threw off the yoke of the Mongols (known as the Tartars), they took on the yoke of the czars, including Ivan the Terrible (who earned his name), Ivan the Great (who was also terrible), and many others. In addition, they instituted a slavery system no less brutal than the American system, in which serfs were tied to the land and their masters with no freedom at all. And when they threw off that yoke, they made it difficult for serfs to rise above barely subsistence poverty.

When the communists came along, the idealists held out hope that they could pull the poor out of the ditch, and they tried. But power-hungry, manipulative leaders can always throw a monkey wrench into things, and that's exactly what Stalin did starting in the 1930s.

What I wanted was to discover a through line from ancient history to today, and this book gave me that. The writing was elegant and the insights were many.
Kulasius
This book is a good start on modern russia. It gives a decent rundown on post soviet russia to help understand how the Soviet Russia came to be. From there it goes to explain soviet russia to it's inevitable fall. Which set's the stage for Yelsten and Putin. It also shows how the past greatly reflects modern russian politics as to how the struggle is a long and difficult one. Easy to understand and points out how much further Russia has to go to break from the old mold's they have used since 900ad. Also, touches on historic cities and districts. Gives a an alright breakdown on current culture but, the author does give some good recommend reads for the casual reader to the more serious studies. A decent start to get ideas on digging further into Russian society and culture.