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Download Mistakes That Worked: 40 Familiar Inventions & How They Came to Be fb2

by John O'Brien,Charlotte Foltz Jones
Download Mistakes That Worked: 40 Familiar Inventions & How They Came to Be fb2
Education & Reference
  • Author:
    John O'Brien,Charlotte Foltz Jones
  • ISBN:
    0385320434
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385320436
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Delacorte Books for Young Readers; Reissue edition (May 1, 1994)
  • Pages:
    96 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Education & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1227 kb
  • ePUB format
    1836 kb
  • DJVU format
    1835 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    419
  • Formats:
    azw doc lit docx


Do you know how many things in your daily life were invented by accident? SANDWICHES came about when an English earl was too busy gambling to eat his meal and . has been added to your Cart.

Do you know how many things in your daily life were invented by accident? SANDWICHES came about when an English earl was too busy gambling to eat his meal and needed to keep one hand free. POTATO CHIPS were first cooked by a chef who was furious when a customer complained that his fried potatoes weren’t thin enough. Coca-Cola has been added to your Cart.

Charlotte Foltz Jones. Mistakes and accidents happen in everyone’s life, but these mistakes and accidents have actually enriched people’s lives. Popsicles, potato chips, Silly Putty, Velcro, and many other familiar things have fascinating stories behind them. In fact, dozens of products and everyday items had surprisingly haphazard beginnings. Mistakes That Worked offers forty of these unusual tales, along with hilarious cartoons and weird and amazing facts. Some were just fun, like Silly Putty, just were tasty, like potato chips and.

Mistakes That Worked book. Piggy banks, silly putty, potato chips and frisbees are all things that were invented by mistake. Jones gathers together in a splendid book that is as informative as it is entertaining.

This book is really cute and the stories are informative and interesting! My one complaint is that the short stories can . I work with students that range from 3rd-6th grade and some of them had difficulty understanding the passages.

This book is really cute and the stories are informative and interesting! My one complaint is that the short stories can require a high level of vocabulary and background knowledge. I wish they wrote them to be a little more kid friendly. 12 people found this helpful.

40 Familiar Inventions & How They Came to Be. By Charlotte Foltz Jones Illustrated by John O’Brien. Charlotte Foltz Jones is the author of Mistakes That Worked, Accidents May Happen, Eat Your Words, and Fingerprints and Talking Bones. Category: Children’s Middle Grade Books Children’s Picture Books.

Mistakes that Worked: 40 Familiar Inventions & How They Came to B. Mistakes that Worked - Charlotte Foltz Jones.

Mistakes that Worked: 40 Familiar Inventions & How They Came to Be. By Charlotte Foltz Jones and John O'Brien. Length: 96 pages45 minutes.

Mistakes and accidents happen in everyone's life, but these mistakes and accidents have actually enriched people's lives. by John O'Brien and Charlotte Foltz . I have read this book more than once, and I plan to read it again. The stories behind the inventions are amazing! I learned so many new facts. by John O'Brien and Charlotte Foltz Jones. Did you know that Levi's jeans were invented by accident? If you want to learn more, read this amazing book! 0. Report. com User, March 2, 1999. Ever since I have been looking for this book! I am so glad to have found it! 0.

Charlotte Foltz Jones and John O'Brien OBrien. An IRA/CBC Children's Choice. 40 full-color cartoons. From the front Cover Piggy banks, silly putty, potato chips and frisbees are all things that were invented by mistake.

Popsicles, potato chips, Silly Putty, Velcro, and many other familiar things have fascinating stories behind them. In fact, dozens of products and everyday items had surprisingly haphazard beginnings. Mistakes That Worked offers forty of these unusual tales, along with hilarious cartoons and weird and amazing facts. Readers will be surprised and inspired!


elektron
I purchased the book for my 7 yr old and it seemed a little advanced for her, but she is reading it and was enthusiastic enough to take it to her teacher to show. I purchased it to teach her about the natural human (and other) frailty... Sometimes, a young child can be hard on themselves in their perceptions of an error. I felt that my child needed to read re-enforcing examples partially serve to provoke a foundation of lifelong self value along with historical knowledge of the world.
Hilarious Kangaroo
What a great book, have used it twice for the topic in teaching paragraph writing. The stories are great and interesting, it really got the students engaged in their writing.
Rare
The images are pretty but I wish they would’ve use a simpler and attractive language for kids.
PanshyR
I have this book in my office at school. I think it's a great way to show kids that mistakes are a wonderful learning opportunity and sometimes lead to unexpected success. Great for teaching or incorporation growth mindset.
Saintrius
Excellent book for teaching kids that all mistakes are not bad, trying out something new pays off. 4th graders were fascinated with it.
Doomwarden
ironically i accidentally bought this book. Went to look at the details and hit the buy now button, even though i have 1-click turned off it still purchased it Happy accident though because my son who is super picky loved it!
Funny duck
This book is really cute and the stories are informative and interesting! My one complaint is that the short stories can require a high level of vocabulary and background knowledge. I work with students that range from 3rd-6th grade and some of them had difficulty understanding the passages. I wish they wrote them to be a little more kid friendly.
Why does a book about how great accidents are start with a sentence ending with: "But the numerous cases of food poisoning prove many food accidents don't work." I'm sorry, what was the point of this book? Literally, in the first paragraph, ON PAGE ONE, you are warning people to be worried about something horrible that will come of your mistake. This is then followed up with a "if you want to experiment in the kitchen, buy this other book" and kitchen safety tips. I get that you don't want to encourage kids to do something dangerous, but surely you could have found a less invasive, more engaging way of making your warnings that won't turn off a child? It's this kind of fear-mongering among my parents' generation that prevented me from experimenting more, and I thought the point of a book like this was to help kids recognize that mistakes can be good. There are some interesting facts in this book, but the presentation and tone are not what I hoped for to inspire a child.