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by Alan Snow
Download How Dogs Really Work! fb2
Arts Music & Photography
  • Author:
    Alan Snow
  • ISBN:
    0001937030
  • ISBN13:
    978-0001937031
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Collins (August 12, 1993)
  • Pages:
    32 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Arts Music & Photography
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1944 kb
  • ePUB format
    1346 kb
  • DJVU format
    1760 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    822
  • Formats:
    lrf azw lit docx


How Dogs Really Work! book.

How Dogs Really Work! book.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. How Dogs Really Work! Paperback – September 1, 1995. by. Alan Snow (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

How Dogs Really Work is a really great book. I love the story, and it is very, very funny. The illustrations of the insides of dogs are very well done and the artist is great. This is a book for older kids and adults too! By Thriftbooks. com User, January 28, 2000. This is by far the best picture book I have ever read in my life. Alan uses such a great sense of humor, and the pictures are wonderful. My mom and I always used to spend extra time after washing our dog so we could read this book

Alan Snow, known for his previous explorations into the lives of both Santa Claus and dogs, has turned his clever attention to these ancient reptiles. And thanks to his inside look at what makes dinosaurs tick, you'll get the answers to all your prehistoric questions: What color were the dinosaurs?

Alan Snow, known for his previous explorations into the lives of both Santa Claus and dogs, has turned his clever attention to these ancient reptiles. And thanks to his inside look at what makes dinosaurs tick, you'll get the answers to all your prehistoric questions: What color were the dinosaurs? Where did they all go?

How Dogs Really Work! Format : Hardback without dust jacket. Both top edges have a slight indentation. What is a dog? So begins this entertaining book that looks at how dogs really work

How Dogs Really Work! Format : Hardback without dust jacket. What is a dog? So begins this entertaining book that looks at how dogs really work. Claiming to be an owner's manual, the book paints a picture of man's best friend - depicted as a living machine.

Praise for How Dogs Really Work!: "One of the funniest books about dogs that I've ever read. Alan Snow's cross-hatch cartoon style illustration is the perfect foil for his deadpan text. The details drawings treat dogs like machines, there are some hilarious notes and details, yet the text has a serious side to. Books for Keeps. Praise for How Cats Really Work!: "Alan Snow's cross-hatch cartoon style illustration is the perfect foil for his deadpan text. This book - and its predecessor about dogs - could become something of a cult.

Alan Snow studied fashion design and illustration at Salisbury. He worked as a wedding dress designer, car designer and tree surgeon before becoming a children's book illustrator. He has also been involved in a number of computer animation projects, including a Peter Gabriel video.

Cutaway cartoons reveal that the Dog is really filled with levers, pistons, tubes, vats, memory banks, sniff motors, and waste disposal plumbing. learn to take dogs apart. Cutaway cartoons reveal that the Dog is really filled with levers, pistons, tubes, vats, memory banks, sniff motors, and waste disposal plumbing.

How Santa Really Works not only gives answers to these questions, it also takes . About the Author Alan Snow was born in Kent He is the author of The Truth About Cats and How Dogs Really Work.

About the Author Alan Snow was born in Kent. After studying fashion at Salisbury College of Art, he worked in various trades, including tree surgery, sound engineering, animation, papermaking and mixing flavours into yoghurt. He is the author of The Truth About Cats and How Dogs Really Work. More Pop-Up Books About Santa Claus.

Alan Snow (born 1959 in Kent, England) is an English author and illustrator of children's literature. How Dogs Really Work (2009). How Cats Really Work (2009). He is best known for his best selling novel Here Be Monsters! (2005), which was made into a successful animation movie in 2014 under the name The Boxtrolls. Since then he has illustrated over 160 books and worked on the art design of video games and animation movies as well. Moreover, he was involved in the design of children's science museum in Japan. In 2005 Snow published his novel Here Be Monsters!, which he illustrated himself with over 500 drawings.

What is a dog? So begins this entertaining book that looks at how dogs really work. Claiming to be an "owner's manual", the book paints a picture of man's best friend - depicted as a living machine.

Pemand
I saw a copy of this book at a veterinarian's office a few months ago. I immediately thought it would be great for my 7 year old daughter who has been telling me since she could talk that she wants to be a vet. This isn't an easy book to find so I was very happy to see it on Amazon. I didn't want a torn copy or one that had been scribbled in. I was counting on honesty from the shipper about the condition of the book since I wanted it to look new or at least almost new. I got what I wanted. It's an incredibly funny and educational book for people of all ages. Some of the concepts are a little over my daughter's head, but she really enjoys it, and I know it's something she'll continue to read in the future.
allegro
Brilliant book with brilliant art by the ... BRILLIANT Alan Snow!
TheFresh
My grandson found a copy of this book in the Vet's office when we took our dog in and on subsequent visits had to look in their book box till he found it to read, the vet didn't even know it was there and got tickled when she saw the comparison of the books body parts on the dog to real life. Great book for kids.
Brakree
The detailed dog illustrations are whimsical, fun and creative! My son and I find something new each time we read this book. A must have for all dog lovers!
Whitesmasher
Kind of stupid.
Cordanara
According to Alan Snow, dogs are complex mechanical animals, composed of pipes, wheels, funnels, bolts, and other hardware store parts. Snow's brightly colored drawings (except for the black and white picture on pp. 10-11) show cutaways of the dog's inner workings, including a telescope (eyes), microphones (ears), and something resembling a washing machine/bank vault to represent the stomach. All of this is very funny and creative on first viewing. He uses computer analogies to explain higher functions like memory: "All dogs, even the boring ones, have some sort of brain..." "All the information that goes into the brain is compared with the information that is already there (called memories)." In the "stored information" section of the dog, the cutaway reveals a bulletin board with tacked-on pictures ("visual memory") and bottles containing a boot, a sausage, and a treat ("smell memory"). Several small internal dogs operate the various levers and gadgets that control the mechanical beast we know as a dog. (This begs the question of what operates the inner dogs, but Snow lets that one go).

Obviously, this imaginative book is strictly for fun, and Snow's illustrations, short answers (e.g., "what happens when the eyes pick up an image of another dog") and guides (e.g., General Maintenance") are humorous and sometimes even instructive. However, the book's mechanistic approach is sometimes off-putting as well. Snow sometimes refers to the dog as an "it," and this construct is reinforced throughout the book. In one two-page section, a vet opens up a sick dog as if the latter were simply a bad engine (screwdrivers and drill parts surround the upside-down canine). Neither the eyes of the vet nor of the dog are shown, and each lacks a basic humanity or "caninity," respectively. Snow opens up the laboratory-like feeling of the book by showing a dog playing, eating, chasing, and exploring around a house, but the basic social nature of the dog is ignored. Other sections of the book just don't feel right. The text for the diagram (that's what the pictures feel like) of the dog viewing an apparently frightened "other" dog reads, "Do I know this dog? Yes. His name is Fang, and he is my friend." The humor around dogs' independence is usually reserved for cats, and the food-centered nature of the dog is nothing new-even if the illustrations are creative.

As clever as the concept, and as well drawn the execution (this book won the New York Times Book Review title for "Best Illustrated Children's Book), the book lacks a certain warmth; you get the feeling that Snow doesn't own a dog. After the initial satisfaction at seeing the bright, creative schematics, the dense text and complex pictures become almost taxing. Occasionally, Snow takes a break from this formula, and his page about how dogs and owners come to resemble each other ("A pretty pampered dog will make its owner feel ugly and inferior. Result-the owner will rush off to the beauty salon.") succeeds well, and is the only illustration showing dogs and humans enjoying each other.

I think little kids will enjoy the pictures and older kids will enjoy the obvious nonsense of it all, but the book could have "strayed" a bit more from its basic premise. One could also view this book as a satire on kids' last-minute grade school reports, but Snow didn't take this route. Snow's book is big, colorful, and inventive, but the reliance on the mechanical humor takes away some of the personality and warmth it might have had.
Dandr
How Dogs Really Work is a really great book. I love the story, and it is very, very funny. The illustrations of the insides of dogs are very well done and the artist is great. I recommend this book with 5 stars.