» » Grandma's Gift

Download Grandma's Gift fb2

by Eric Velasquez
Download Grandma's Gift fb2
Arts Music & Photography
  • Author:
    Eric Velasquez
  • ISBN:
    080272082X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0802720825
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Walker Childrens; 1 edition (October 12, 2010)
  • Pages:
    40 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Arts Music & Photography
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1792 kb
  • ePUB format
    1796 kb
  • DJVU format
    1556 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    625
  • Formats:
    lit txt mbr lrf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This prequel to Eric Velasquez's biographical picture book Grandma's Records is the story of a Christmas holiday that young Eric spends with his grandmother. After they prepare their traditional Puerto Rican Christmas celebration.

Grandma recognizes his fascination, and presents Eric with the perfect Christmas gift- a sketchbook and colored . Prequel to Eric Velasquez's autobiographical picture book, Grandma's Records.

Grandma recognizes his fascination, and presents Eric with the perfect Christmas gift- a sketchbook and colored pencils- to use in his first steps toward becoming an artist. Interest age level : Ages: 5 - 8 Years. Pura Belpre Award, Illustrator, 2011. Book design by Nicole Gastonguay"-Title page verso. Gastonguay, Nicole; Prequel to (work) Velasquez, Eric. Grandma's records; Walker Publishing Company; Lehigh Pheonix.

This prequel to Eric Velasquez's biographical picture book Grandma's Records is the story of a Christmas holiday that young Eric spends with his grandmother. After they prepare their traditional Puerto Rican Christmas celebration, Eric and Grandma visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a school project, where he sees a painting by Diego Velasquez and realizes for the first time that he could be an artist when he grows up.

This prequel to Eric Velasquez's biographical picture book Grandma's Records is the story of a Christmas . Grandma's gift was a sketchbook and colored pencils. Velasquez wrote this book about when he and his grandmother went to the museum. His grandmother only spoke Spanish and did not know anything in the museum except one painting.

Meet award winning author illustrator Eric Velasquez, see the numerous children's books he has illustrated, as well as the . Grandma's Gift Eric Velasquez, 2010 ISBN-10: 080272082X.

Meet award winning author illustrator Eric Velasquez, see the numerous children's books he has illustrated, as well as the many book covers he has created. My Uncle Martin's Big Heart Angela Farris Watkins, 2010 ISBN-10: 0810989751.

Grandma’s Gift is the 2011 Pura Belpre Award winner for Illustration and one look into this book will tell you wh.

Grandma’s Gift is the 2011 Pura Belpre Award winner for Illustration and one look into this book will tell you why. The pictures are absolutely magnificent; full of vivid color, life and most importantly depth of story (as is Grandma’s Records). But in my excitement, I’m getting ahead of myself. First, some background. The son of Afro-Puerto Rican parents, Velasquez says his love of art (written, drawn and played) came from an early age and was a natural choice since his mother, father and Puerto Rican grandma all surrounded him with art and encouraged his appetite for it. Growing up in this.

Lizzie Velasquez was born with a rare syndrome that gives her an aged appearance. Lizzie Velasquez was born with a rare syndrome that gives her an aged appearance and makes it hard for the 63lb woman to gain weight.

Grandma witnesses his fascination, and presents Eric with the perfect Christmas gift - a set . A heart-warming story of self-discovery, Grandma's Gift is a celebration of the special bond between a grandparent and grandchild.

Grandma witnesses his fascination, and presents Eric with the perfect Christmas gift - a set of paints to use in his first steps toward becoming an artist. Winner of the 2011 Belpre Illustrator Award. Expand Product Details. Eric describes Christmas at his grandmother's apartment in Spanish Harlem the year she introduced him to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This prequel to Eric Velasquez's biographical picture book Grandma's Records is the story of a Christmas holiday that young Eric spends with his grandmother. After they prepare their traditional Puerto Rican celebration, Eric and Grandma visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a school project, where he sees a painting by Diego Velasquez and realizes for the first time that he could be an artist when he grows up. Grandma witnesses his fascination, and presents Eric with the perfect Christmas gift-a sketchbook and colored pencils-to use in his first steps toward becoming an artist. A heartwarming story of self-discovery, Grandma's Gift is a celebration of the special bond between a grandparent and grandchild.


Vojar
This is a wonderful story of tradition. It teaches the importance of knowing your heritage and passing traditions on. It also shows how frightening it can be to step out of your comfort zone, but that once you do, you will open up other doors for yourself. Just because you are from one place does not mean that you cannot find comfort in another. History is all around us we just have to take a look. This is a picture book that does a great job at recreating what life was like when Eric was a child. This book is based on events that actually happened in his life.
Eric spends every Christmas Vacation with his grandmother El Barrio. This year he has an assignment to complete while on vacation, but first he must help his grandmother prepare her famous pasteles. If she gets all the shopping and cooking done, she will then take him to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This is not easy for her because she does not speak English and she usually does not travel outside of her neighborhood. She knows this assignment is important so she agrees to take him before Christmas. Once they are at the museum, Grandma feels nervous because she does not recognize anyone until they reach the piece of art Eric is supposed to write a report about. Grandma immediately recognizes the person in the painting and starts to feel better. She later explained that she learned about this person when she was growing up in Puerto Rico.
Beazezius
We were looking for a book that our son could use for a book report for Hispanic Heritage month and this book met all of the criteria. Written and Illustrated by a Hispanic author. It was also about Hispanic heritage. My son read the book and enjoyed it even though this was well below his reading capabilities.
Dobpota
Arrived in a timely manner and was as described in product description.
misery
This is an excellent book and I highly recommend it. My husband and I bought this for our four year old daughter after checking it out at the library until we had reached the borrowing limit. Our daughter is an avid reader and as her parents we have a deep appreciation for seeing people who look like us depicted in a positive light. We enjoyed how the Spanish language and Puero Rican culture are peppered throughout the book and the art work is beautiful. We also enjoyed learning about the wonderful relationship the little boy had with his grandmother. This is a wonderful book that we will be reading for years to come.
Runeterror
For grandmothers new and old, this is a wonderful book about sharing time, space, and the gifts that make people unique.
Walan
Exactly like the library book only brand new! glad i got it. dont have any more to say. good bye.
Detenta
Eric Velasquez is the award-winning illustrator of more than 25 children’s books, including three that he wrote. In Grandma’s Gift and Grandma’s Records, reviewed here, Eric brings to life childhood moments that illuminate the warm and meaningful relationship he enjoyed with his grandmother, a native of Puerto Rico and resident of El Barrio, a predominantly Puerto Rican neighborhood in East Harlem.

In a category where such books are woefully rare, both of Velasquez’s Grandma stories represent positive images of Afro-Latinx children and their families.

Although the story in Grandma’s Gift takes place within a few square miles of contemporary New York City, it also casts a spotlight on a long-ago historical figure. Juan de Pareja was an enslaved man of African descent who worked in the studio of 17th-century Spanish master Diego Velázquez and who became a painter in his own right. When Eric was a boy, Velázquez’s luminous portrait of de Pareja was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a price exceeding $5 million.

Grandma’s Gift contains two additional distinguishing aspects: elements of Puerto Rican culture preserved and passed down by the boy’s grandmother, and contrasting views between two physically proximate but culturally distant worlds, represented by El Barrio and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

At the story’s beginning, Eric is leaving school for Christmas break, in the company of his grandmother. His school assignment, to be completed during the holidays, is a visit to the Velázquez exhibit. But first, grandmother and grandson go shopping at La Marqueta, once a central feature of El Barrio, composed of bustling shops tucked under a railroad trestle. At La Marqueta, it’s evident that Eric’s grandmother is a respected and beloved member of the community. Not only do butchers and greengrocers call her by title and name—Doña Carmen—they are also familiar with the high standards she expects from every cut of meat and vegetable she purchases. When the shopping is done, Eric and his grandmother return to her apartment, where she launches an elaborate preparation of traditional Puerto Rican holiday dishes. Here, she is clearly in her element, deftly handling each step of the cooking, filling, and rolling of the pasteles, much to the admiration of young Eric.

Nearly all of Doña Carmen’s dialogue is parenthetically translated into English, immediately behind her Spanish words. While this solution is not particularly elegant, it reflects the challenge that authors and publishers face in including authentic representations of a Spanish-speaking environment within an English text. The story translates greetings in Spanish by shopkeepers, words of wisdom spoken by the grandmother, and details relevant to the story, such as the names of the root vegetables used in making pasteles: calabaz, yautía, plátanos verdes, guineos verdes, papas.

El Barrio is a place that Eric’s grandmother comfortably navigates day after day. Here, her native tongue predominates, and everyone is a shade of brown. But when she and Eric head for the museum, a short bus ride away, they leave behind that familiar environment and land before the facade of the Metropolitan, cloaked in cultural status and imposing architecture. As Eric notes, there’s no one “from Puerto Rico on the streets and no one was speaking in Spanish.” At this point, Eric becomes her guide in this English-speaking world, translating the signs and captions that they encounter, stepping into a role that second- or third-generation immigrant children often play in their elders’ lives.

The highlight of the story arrives when Eric comes face to face with the portrait of Juan de Pareja, hanging in its gilded frame in one of the august exhibition halls of the museum. As a young person of color in the 1970s, he has never seen a member of his own people elevated to such a status: “He seemed so real—much like someone we might see walking around El Barrio. I couldn’t believe that this was a painting in a museum.” Eric is amazed and proud to learn that Juan de Pareja eventually achieved freedom and became a painter in his own right. For Eric, this discovery is a revelation that sparks artistic fire. On Christmas Eve, after everyone enjoys a traditional holiday dinner, Eric sits under the Christmas tree and opens his grandmother’s gift. It’s a sketchbook and a set of colored pencils. He immediately begins to draw a self-portrait. Through this gift, Eric’s grandmother expresses a clear vote of confidence in her grandson’s dreams, underscoring that he, too—a child of El Barrio, an Afro Latino—can follow in the footsteps of Juan de Pareja.

This touching, autobiographical story is richly illustrated in Velasquez’s photorealistic style, which authentically depicts settings and brings dimension to each character. Eric imbues his subjects with individually distinct physical characteristics, lending to each an air of nobility. He lovingly paints his grandmother as a lady of dignified bearing and warmth, usually dressed in subdued colors. But he often lavishes this humanizing treatment even on background characters, such as fellow passengers on the train and a nameless guard at the museum. In most of the illustrations, Eric employs a wide and vivid range of hues, but like Diego Velázquez, he sometimes falls back on a deliberately limited palette. When the boy and his grandmother stand before the portrait of Juan de Pareja, the rich browns of the ancient oil painting harmoniously come together with the rich browns of the grandmother’s clothing, as well as the skin tones of all three figures. He puts this deft touch with a monochromatic palette to great effect in the story’s electric moment of revelation, as the child Eric looks on the portrait of Juan de Pareja and grasps a new possibility for his future.
For starters, I was immediately drawn to this book because from the cover page, I was able to see that the book would be about a special bond between a boy and his Grandmother. After reading the book, i was not disappointed. I appreciated all the different things they connected to one another in this book. Because the the pictures were so greatly drawn and accurately followed the text, it is an extremely easy read. The pictures had a very smooth texture to them that gave them polished and refined. I also appreciated how Eric, the author, was able to bridge the gap between a younger and older generation through a strong bond and cherished gift. I am huge on cultivating the positive interest that young children have! This book is great for introducing the subject of dreams and ambitions inside of the classroom.