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by Tricia Tusa,Kate Feiffer
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Animals
  • Author:
    Tricia Tusa,Kate Feiffer
  • ISBN:
    1416949615
  • ISBN13:
    978-1416949619
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books; 1St Edition edition (February 24, 2009)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Animals
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1677 kb
  • ePUB format
    1657 kb
  • DJVU format
    1119 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    363
  • Formats:
    lrf mbr azw lit


Tricia Tusa's pleasing artwork makes the Puddles' world complete. Kate Feiffer is a writer and a filmmaker.

Tricia Tusa's pleasing artwork makes the Puddles' world complete. Let the Puddle family into your heart. You will be glad you did. About The Author. Ms. Feiffer and her family live on Martha's Vineyard, MA. About The Illustrator. Photograph by a bird in a tree in the Luxembourg gardens in Paris. She lives with her family in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books (February 24, 2009). ISBN13: 9781439156698.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Kate Feiffer's debut novel is by turns funny, heartwarming, and wholly satisfying. Tricia Tusa's pleasing artwork makes the Puddles' world complete. Read on the Scribd mobile app. This book tells the story of how the Puddle family finally got away from their country vacation home and the unfortunate way that rain clouds always seem to find them. You will be glad you di. . Not only that, but in their rush to leave, they Baby Puddle and her brother Tom Puddle have a mother and father who cannot agree on anything.

So Mrs. Puddle calls her daughter Emily and Mr. Puddle calls her Ferdinanda. And everyone else? They call her Baby. Having parents who agree to disagree does mean twice as many presents on your birthday, but it can complicate your life! There was the time Baby's parents couldn't agree on what kind of dog to get - so they got two, both named Sally.

Электронная книга "The Problem with the Puddles", Kate Feiffer

Электронная книга "The Problem with the Puddles", Kate Feiffer. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Problem with the Puddles" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

by Kate Feiffer (author), Tricia Tusa (illustrator). Reading level: Ages 8-12. Illustrator, Tricia Tusa, has done a wonederful job of furthering that connection with her quirky and very suitable illustrations rendered in pencil, crayon, and watercolor

by Kate Feiffer (author), Tricia Tusa (illustrator). Hardcover: 208 pages. Illustrator, Tricia Tusa, has done a wonederful job of furthering that connection with her quirky and very suitable illustrations rendered in pencil, crayon, and watercolor. There is almost a picture on every page making it a great choice for kids that are new to the more serious layout of chapter books. Sarah Pennypacker, author of the Clementine series, said, The problem with the Puddles is a blast from first page to last. My only complaint is that I didn’t write it! Excerpt from chapter one: Every day clouds zipped across the sky until they got to the Puddle property.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Dogs - Fiction, Lost and found possessions - Fiction, Family life - Fiction. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on January 13, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Tusa's charming illustrations can't rescue this ill-conceived venture.

The Problem with the Puddles. by Kate Feiffer · Tricia Tusa. Eight and a half years ago, when their beautiful baby girl was born, Mr. and Mrs. Puddle couldn't agree on what to name her. What if your parents agreed to disagree? Eight and a half years ago, when their beautiful baby girl was born, Mr. So Mrs.

What if your parents agreed to disagree? Eight and a half years ago, when their beautiful baby girl was born, Mr. and Mrs. Puddle couldn't agree on what to name her. So Mrs. Puddle calls her daughter Emily and Mr. Puddle calls her Ferdinanda. And everyone else? They call her Baby. Having parents who agree to disagree does mean twice as many presents on your birthday, but it can complicate your life! There was the time Baby's parents couldn't agree on what kind of dog to get -- so they got two, both named Sally. One summer day, when rushing back to the city from their country house, the Puddles leave the Sallys behind. Will the Puddles agree to go back? What will become of the Sallys? Kate Feiffer's debut novel is by turns funny, heartwarming, and wholly satisfying. Tricia Tusa's pleasing artwork makes the Puddles' world complete. Let the Puddle family into your heart. You will be glad you did.

Bladebringer
The Puddles are getting ready to leave their country home for the city. Mr. and Mrs. Puddle once agreed until neither could agree on a name for their daughter. Mr. Puddle calls her Ferdinada and Mrs. Puddles calls her Emily ... but the nurse wrote "Baby" on the official birth certificate thus supposedly ending the argument. After that, the two Puddles never agree on anything and turn everything into an argument. As they are packing up the car, their arguing causes them to forget their great dane and chihuahua (both named Sally since they couldn't agree on names) and they leave them behind. Halfway towards their city home, they realize the dogs are missing and yet another argument ensues of what they should do. Their arguing leads to them getting stranded on the road. In the meantime, the dogs set off on their own to find their owners and meet with different "adventures" involving a dog napper, skunks and a cranky farmer. The end of the book finally has the Puddles agreeing, but doesn't really resolve anything. Actually, one tidbit thrown in at the very end seemed to have come from left-field until I realized a small storyline was mentioned at the very beginning of the book.
This book has a lot of randomness, literal "fill in the blanks" (where the author encourages the read to add to the story), and quite a bit of potty humor. It might appeal to very young ages, but was not enjoyed by my 9-12 year olds. Then again, the vocabulary might confuse a younger reader. In all honestly, I think more humorous books like "The Secrets Of Dripping Fang" series and "The Floods" series would better appeal to young readers.
Gholbithris
THE PROBLEM WITH THE PUDDLES is not a book for adults. Not even adults that read a lot of children's literature and appreciate children's literature. In order for an adult to truly appreciate Kate Feiffer's book, they would have to let go of being an adult, and read it through the eyes of the child inside of them. Some adults can do that easier than others. Some simply can't do that at all. It would be a shame for an adult reader to judge this book on something it's not!

The Puddle family has plenty of problems! Mr. and Mrs. Puddle, were never able to agree on a name for their youngest daughter Baby and have long since "agreed to disagree". What Mrs. Puddle wants, Mr. Puddle doesn't. What Mr. Puddle wants, Mrs. Puddle doesn't. So naturally, when Mrs. Puddle wants the rainy weather to clear up so the family can return to their home in the city, Mr. Puddle becomes overjoyed when the bad weather forces them to remain in their country home a little longer than planned. When the rain clouds depart and the Puddles leave their city home in a hurried rush, left behind are the two family pets: Big Sally and Little Sally. Missing their owners and worried they may never return, the two dogs set off in the direction of the city, hoping to reunite with their chaotic owners.

This quite frankly, may be the strangest children's book I've ever read. From the zany characters and the ridiculous things they say and do, to the author's incessant play on words, to the alternating chapters that switch from the Puddles' point of view to their dogs' point of view, this book is anything but normal. Rarely does the plot go where the reader expects it to as the Puddles' trip and the dogs' dilemma gets further and further off track. New characters are introduced along the way and they're just as wild and crazy as the arguing, repetitious Puddles. It doesn't surprise me that many adults find this book annoying. Remember though, Kate Feiffer didn't write this book for adults!

I'll admit, at times, the Puddles wore on my nerves. Especially Mr. and Mrs. Puddle and Frankolin, the man who offers the family help when their car stalls. I felt sorry for Tom and Baby Puddle for having to endure the constant arguing and rambling of the adults and couldn't blame Baby for making a run for it at one point in the story. I was tempted to make a run for it as well! But to fixate on the annoying adults in this book would be a mistake. Actually, I'm afraid that focusing too much on the adults in this book, would cause a reader to overlook (or miss altogether) the story's real charm: Big Sally and Little Sally.

I found myself hurrying through the chapters from the Puddles' point of view just so I could get back to the dogs' story. I loved the friendship between the dogs and the conversations they had with each other to pass the time ("Which came first, the country or the city?"). I think children would be able to relate very easily to Little Sally's frustration with being small and even to Big Sally's frustration with being too big ("Small dogs have small problems."). One particular scene involving Little Sally facing her fears and swimming across a river, stands out as one of the novel's more poignant moments. There's something about these two that is charming and sweet and their scenes balance the absurdity of the Puddles' scenes rather nicely.

THE PROBLEM WITH THE PUDDLES is not a book for everyone (adults). It is however, most certainly a book for someone (kids)! Kate Feiffer's voice is fun and unique and should be enjoyed among middle aged readers. If you can imagine Roald Dahl writing his version of HOMEWARD BOUND: THE INCREDIBLE JOURNEY, you have a pretty good idea of this story's style. The plot does take it's fair share of detours, and some will be more difficult to stay with than others (particularly the introduction of a "Secret Catcher"). But in the end, THE PROBLEM WITH THE PUDDLES is a book that will not easily be forgotten by those that read it. If anything, for being totally different than anything else you've ever read!
Lavivan
Meet the Puddles: Mr. and Mrs. Puddle, who agree to disagree about nearly everything; their son, Tom; and their daughter, Baby, who has three names because her parents could not agree on one. The Puddles have two dogs, a teacup Chihuahua and a Great Dane, both named Sally. Since Mr. and Mrs. Puddle disagree about so many things, their lives are often filled with confusion and chaos.

One day, when the Puddles are rushing back to their apartment in the city from their home on a small island in the country, they forget both dogs. It's been raining and storming for one solid week, and Mrs. Puddle is sick of being cooped up in the country. But Mr. Puddles is really enjoying the extra week there. When the weather finally improves, the whole family scrambles to load their car. In the ensuing chaos and mayhem, Big Sally and Little Sally are forgotten.

By the time Mr. Puddle has driven 74 miles, Baby notices that the Sallies aren't amongst the crowded jumble in the car, and a big disagreement follows. Mr. Puddle wants to turn around right away and head back to the country to find them, but Mrs. Puddle insists the neighbors will look after them. So he keeps on driving, and soon the vehicle overheats and stops. A peculiar but helpful man named Frankolin comes to their aid. He drives the Puddles to his house so Mr. Puddle can call a mechanic to come tow and fix the car.

Meanwhile, back in the country, the two Sallies get tired of waiting for their owners to return and strike out on their own. They hide in a cart full of luggage and stow away for the ferry ride. Back on dry land again, they head down a road they hope will take them to the city. Little Sally is exhausted, so Big Sally gives her sister a ride on her back. Then along comes a man driving a pickup truck who insists the dogs come with him. He feeds them treats and tells them he is a "secret catcher."

Baby crawls out of Frankolin's bathroom window and sneaks off to locate the Sallies herself. But a policeman finds her first and returns her to Frankolin's house. Frankolin offers to help the family search for their dogs. So everyone piles into the small car and off they go driving here and there, not really knowing where to look. When they come to Compromise Road, the Puddles believe it would be a good area to explore, but Frankolin doesn't think so. It turns out he has his own reason to disagree.

If only folks would or could agree or even agree to agree. But the utter lack of agreement is what makes Kate Feiffer's debut novel so complicated and full of fun and surprises.

--- Reviewed by Carole Turner