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by Richard Olney
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Regional & International
  • Author:
    Richard Olney
  • ISBN:
    0879236132
  • ISBN13:
    978-0879236137
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    David R Godine Pub; Slp edition (August 1, 1987)
  • Subcategory:
    Regional & International
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1476 kb
  • ePUB format
    1893 kb
  • DJVU format
    1829 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    992
  • Formats:
    txt lrf doc mbr


The French Menu Cookbook: The Food and Wine of France-Season by Delicious Season-in Beautifully . It was into this lunar food landscape that Richard Olney introduced several revolutionary ideas at once in The French Menu Cookbook.

The French Menu Cookbook: The Food and Wine of France-Season by Delicious Season-in Beautifully Composed Menus for American Dining and Entertaining by an American Living in Paris.

His FRENCH MENU COOKBOOK is an inspiration, giving a lasting insight into a special way of life. This book's structure is its message: the food is introduced not by category, but by course within menus, and the menus themselves are organized by season.

Read "The French Menu Cookbook The Food and Wine of France-Season by Delicious Season-in Beautifully Composed Menus for American Dining and Entertaining by an American Living in Paris. As those who knew him will attest, Francophile and food writer Richard Olney was one of a kind-a writerly cook who had a tremendous influence on American cooking via his well-worn cottage on a hillside in Provence.

The French Menu Cookbook is one of the most important culinary works of the twentieth century.

The French Menu Cookbook is one of the most important culinary works of the twentieth century Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. Everything Restaurant Recipes Cookbook. 32 MB·45,736 Downloads. you enjoy exploring these recipes and make some great restaurant meals at home for your Appendix The Everything Restau.

Now in paperback, this landmark, debut cookbook from Richard Olney is brimming with over 150 authentic recipes .

Now in paperback, this landmark, debut cookbook from Richard Olney is brimming with over 150 authentic recipes that capture the flavors and spirit of the French countryside. Originally published in 1970, The French Menu Cookbook is one of the most important culinary works of the twentieth century. It has served as a foundational resource and beacon to cooks worldwide-including visionaries like Alice Waters-who redefined American cuisine. Well ahead of his time, Olney champions a seasonal approach to cooking and provides thoughtful, intriguing wine pairings.

The French Menu Cookbook book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The French Menu Cookbook.

The French Menu Cookbook includes 32 thoughtful menus - from a simple Provencal lunch to an informal autumn dinner, an elegant winter supper and a festive meal for two. Each menu includes honest and enlightening explanations of how the French really cook and compelling descriptions o. . Each menu includes honest and enlightening explanations of how the French really cook and compelling descriptions of dishes and techniques. With lyrical writing and unsurpassed French recipes, Olney's delightful book is a masterful resource that is a must for every home cook. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

French Menu Cook Book.

Olney was born in Marathon, Iowa. He lived in a house above the village of Solliès-Toucas in Provence, France, for most of his adult life, where he wrote many classic and influential cookbooks of French country cooking

скачать книгу бесплатно Sorrel (French, oseille) requires no particular care or special soil, and with a bit of protection during the winter, will produce all year round for four or five years.

скачать книгу бесплатно. Sorrel (French, oseille) requires no particular care or special soil, and with a bit of protection during the winter, will produce all year round for four or five years. Wild fennel (fenouil) is another good garden possibility, as are all the semi-wild salads: rocket (roquette), lamb’s lettuce (m?che), burnet (pimprenelle), purslane (pourpier ? salade), basil (basilic), borage (bourrache) and many others.


Qutalan
Looking back to 1970, the year this book was first published, puts its sophistications in context and underscores the enormity of its contributions. America was deep in culinary ignorance, eating out of cans and supplementing that metal-tinged blandness with gut-busting mountains of artificial 'foods'. America was lost somehwere between the post-war meat-and-potatoes era and the chemical concoctions of the 80s and beyond. Small glimmers of possibility illuminated the occassional suburban cocktail party, when hostesses under the influence of Julia Child trotted out a few hotel-food hors d'oeuvres, and a few ethnic enclaves still held up a candle of flavor, but America was largely a culinary wasteland. Servings were large, everything was bland, and mealtime had become TV time. Without flavor or family, American meals were effectively dead.

It was into this lunar food landscape that Richard Olney introduced several revolutionary ideas at once in The French Menu Cookbook. I should say that he RE-introduced these ideas, because they had existed, with varying degrees of sophistication, for as long as people had eaten, but an industrial food system had interrupted that great cultural memory. This book's structure is its message: the food is introduced not by category, but by course within menus, and the menus themselves are organized by season. For those of us who have heard the gospel of seasonality and regional availability and freshness from Alice Waters and Paul Bertolli, at al, it can be easy to forget that this idea is still, 36 years after The French Menu Cookbook, radical, and so against the grain of the industrial food complex as to be almost an act of treason. But Richard Olney's way with food started that revolution at possibly the most inoportune moment in Americna history.

A sample menu says it all:

An Informal Spring Dinner

Hors d'oeuvre of Crudites

Shrimp Quiche

Coq au Vin

Steamed Potatoes

Wild Green Salad

Cheeses

Flamri with Raspberry Sauce

all of the above matched with appropriate wines.

Notice the careful development through the courses, the constant shifts of flavor to keep the palate alive, the seasonal ingredients... All of this was deeply shocking at the time.

But there's one more big surprise: this book is every bit as good today as it was in 1970. It doesn't feel even remotely dated, like Julia Child's books do. Maybe, in hueing so faithfully to the principles of freshness, seasonality, and regional availability, Olney tapped into something timeless. And so this book was a classic the day it was published, and remains one of the most sophisticated, satisfying, and inspiring cookbooks ever published.

Very highly recommended.
Friert
This is a cookbook and a history lesson all in one, if you get this book also buy Provence 1970, it all comes together.
Alice waters used this book in her early years and olney said she really got it.
The combo is a beautiful story of American chefs taking on French cooking and creating the American dishes
That have been the basis of cooking in America including all the improvisation that has lead to today's
Great chefs and restaurants and cooking schools.
Headline - how America learned to cook - requires both books - puts you on the track for more great reading
And eating
Vikus
This is my favorite edition of this book. I recommend it to everyone I know who cooks or is learning French cuisine. This was actually the second copy I have purchased (this is a gift). Definitely a lifetime shelf item.
Goltigor
Love it.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
Others here have written lengthy and lyrical paeans to this book, so I will try to be brief. It is a masterful book, no doubt about it. Originally published in 1970, "The French Menu Cookbook" reflects a level of sophistication -- and of authentic French sensibility -- that could not be found anywhere else, "Mastering the Art" included, back in the day. Many of the seasonal menus are precisely what one would have at a family gathering or a good solid bistro "over there" -- take, for example, one of the "informal spring dinners":

Filets de Sardines Crues en Marinade
Grillade de Boeuf, Marchand de Vin
Gratin de Pommes de Terre
Salade des Champs
Fromages
Tarte aux Pommes

And of course there are the formal menus, with foie gras, truffles, lobster, pheasant and sauteed cepes.

All along the way, there is Olney's elegant prose. The essay on wine that spans perhaps thirty pages is the most readable, comprehensive and succinct review of basic principles of wine making and service, and of the key French varietals and appellations, I believe I have ever seen. A lot of knowledge and instinct is distilled in these few pages.

This book, which preceded "Simple French Food" by a few years, is more the traditional "cookbook" with reasonably detailed recipes, unlike the Olney masterwork "Simple" that followed it. I still think "Simple French Food" is his crowning achievement, because as my review of "Simple" indicates, it is a book of general principles and a guide to improvisation, not a "recipe book" at all. If you spend a lot of time with "Simple," you will learn to make your own recipes and compose your own menus because it encourages you to riff in the kitchen, to work on your own chops.

But with "Menu," you have a very detailed roadmap -- start to finish menus, recipes and pitch-perfect wine suggestions for each course. It's all good. But to me, by distilling it all down to first principles in "Simple French Food," Olney really climbed the mountain. Perhaps my preference for "Simple" is just because it was the book I came to first -- I bought "Simple" in 1977, used it over and over and over again, and bought my first (and still my only) copy of "Menu" when the revised hardcover edition from David R. Godine came out in 1985.

Whichever of the two books you may regard more highly, both of them belong on every serious food and wine lover's bookshelf.