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by Nelson Foster,Linda S. Cordell
Download Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World fb2
Cooking Education & Reference
  • Author:
    Nelson Foster,Linda S. Cordell
  • ISBN:
    0816513244
  • ISBN13:
    978-0816513246
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Arizona Press; 1 edition (July 1, 1992)
  • Pages:
    191 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Cooking Education & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1798 kb
  • ePUB format
    1479 kb
  • DJVU format
    1608 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    699
  • Formats:
    lit mbr docx doc


Chilies to Chocolate traces the biological and cultural history of some New World crops that have worldwide .

Chilies to Chocolate traces the biological and cultural history of some New World crops that have worldwide economic importance. CONTENTS Introduction, by Nelson Foster & Linda S. Cordell 1. Europeans' Wary Encounter with Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Other New World Foods, by Alan Davidson 2. The Renaissance of Amaranth, by Daniel K. Early 3. Vanilla: Nectar of the Gods, by Patricia Rain 4. Maize: Gift from America's First Peoples, by Walton C. Galinat 5. Beans of the Americas, by Lawrence Kaplan & Lucille N.

Chilies to Chocolate book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Foster, Nelson; Cordell, Linda . Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Foster, Nelson; Cordell, Linda S. Publication date. Internet Archive Books.

Chilies to Chocolate traces the biological and cultural history of some New World . I purchased the book to satisfy a anthropology class. It is an easy read and very informative.

CONTENTS Introduction, by Nelson Foster & Linda S. Maize: Gift from. Kaplan 6. The Peripatetic Chili Pepper: Diffusion of the Domesticated Capsicums Since Columbus, by Jean Andrews 7. Forgotten Roots of the Incas, by Noel Vietmeyer 8. A Brief History and Botany of Cacao.

But today's trend is entirely separate from the Braudel era, from those preoccupations with the material world and the social struggles it embodies, which Braudel himself had sedulously popularized. Instead there is a concern with substances, especially edibles, and how good they are: a fascination with sensation that is not at all surprising at this historical juncture.

oceedings{Super1993ChiliesTC, title {Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World. author {John C. Super and Nelson Foster and Linda S. Cordell}, year {1993} }. John C. Super, Nelson Foster, Linda S. Cordell.

Chilies to Chocolate. Food the Americas Gave the World. Columbus stumbled upon the New world while seeking the riches of the Orient, yet native peoples of the Americas already held riches beyond his knowing. From maize to potatoes to native beans, a variety of crops unknown to Europeans was being cultivated by indigenous peoples of teh Americas.

Spanning agronomy to archeology & anthropology, Chilies to Chocolate covers the broad range of New World .

Spanning agronomy to archeology & anthropology, Chilies to Chocolate covers the broad range of New World crops now responsib.

Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World (Reader Christopher Columbus, Journal in FHR, pp. 314-317. 10/20: Food Scares and Food Reforms Friedrich Accum, Treatise on Adulterations of Food, in FHR, pp. 393-395 Sylvester Graham, A Treatise on Bread, and Bread Making,’ in FHR, pp. 401-404 Wilbur O. Atwater, Principles of Nutrition, in FHR, pp. 421-426 Fanny Merritt Farmer, The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, in FHR, 427-28

Columbus stumbled upon the New World while seeking the riches of the orient, yet native peoples of the Americas already held riches beyond his knowing. From maize to potatoes to native beans, a variety of crops unfamiliar to Europeans were cultivated by indigenous peoples of the Americas, with other foods like chilies and chocolate on hand to make diets all the more interesting (even when used in combination, as aficionados of molé will attest). Chilies to Chocolate traces the biological and cultural history of some New World crops that have worldwide economic importance. Drawing on disciplines as diverse as anthropology, ethnobotany, and agronomy, it focuses on the domestication and use of these plants by native peoples and their dispersion into the fields and kitchens of the Old World: tomatoes to Italy, chili peppers throughout Asia, cacao wherever a sweet tooth craves chocolate. Indeed, potatoes and maize now rank with wheat and rice as the world's principal crops. "The sweetness of corn on the cob is sweeter for knowing the long, winding way by which it has come into one's hands," observe Foster and Cordell. Featuring contributions by Gary Nabhan, Alan Davidson, and others, Chilies to Chocolate will increase readers' appreciation of the foods we all enjoy, of the circuitous routes by which they have become part of our diets, and of the vital role that Native Americans have played in this process. CONTENTSIntroduction, by Nelson Foster & Linda S. Cordell1. Europeans' Wary Encounter with Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Other New World Foods, by Alan Davidson2. The Renaissance of Amaranth, by Daniel K. Early3. Vanilla: Nectar of the Gods, by Patricia Rain4. Maize: Gift from America's First Peoples, by Walton C. Galinat5. Beans of the Americas, by Lawrence Kaplan & Lucille N. Kaplan6. The Peripatetic Chili Pepper: Diffusion of the Domesticated Capsicums Since Columbus, by Jean Andrews7. Forgotten Roots of the Incas, by Noel Vietmeyer8. A Brief History and Botany of Cacao, by John A. West9. Quinoa's Roundabout Journey to World Use, by John F. McCamantEpilogue: Native Crops of the Americas: Passing Novelties or Lasting Contributions to Diversity? by Gary Paul NabhanAppendix: Food Plants of American Origin

Jaberini
Well, back in the days of the "Columbian Exchange" they did go viral. Now I guess it's old news. But if you're interested in the origins and spread round the world of such edibles as potatoes, tomatoes, chilies, chocolate, corn, quinoa, beans, and vanilla (to name most of them), you've come to the right place. This slim, edited volume, written mostly in a very readable fashion, provides interesting and useful information on such topics. There is also a fascinating chapter on the "unknown foods", cultivated by Native Americans in Central or South America, but ignored by the Spanish colonizers and by outsiders ever since. These include varieties of potato, plus oca, maca, arracacha, yacon, ahipa, ulluco, and a couple of others. You never heard of these roots, right? Neither had I, but now I am the wiser because I've read Foster and Cordell's edited book. The only criticism I have is that the article on chilies contains several historical or linguistic errors which could have been checked. The author of that one is more a gourmet chef and writer than a scientist and it shows. The epilogue, about the damage done to Native American horticultural heritage and how to repair it, if possible, is also a useful addition. Somebody suggested color photos of the various crops and I think that would have been an excellent idea.
inetserfer
This book is just what it purports to be in the preface: a series of stand-alone articles taken from a program presented at the American Academy of Sciences. Therefore, it is not a comprehensive treatment of all foods from the Americas. What it does cover are in-depth chapters on various American foods that the authors deem to be most important, especially in the future. While I didn't find the book difficult to put down between readings, I was always eager to pick it up again.
I am listing the chapter titles here because I think they are an excellent representation of what is actually covered in the book: Europeans' Wary Encounter with Tomatoes, Potatoes, and Other New World Foods; The Renaissance of Amaranth; Vanilla, the Nectar of the Gods; Maize, the Gift from America's First Peoples; Beans of the Americas; The Chili Pepper, and Diffusion of the Domesticated Capsicums Since Columbus; Forgotten Roots (plant roots) of the Incas; The History and Botany of Cacao; Quinoa's Roundabout Journey to World Use; and the Epilogue: Native Crops of the Americas, Passing Novelties, or Lasting Contributions to Diversity.
The book could have been improved by a short section of color photographs of the plants discussed, showing what they are, and how they grow. I didn't know what amaranth was, and had to look it up elsewhere. Even though I have eaten quinoa, other people might not know what it is. But to be fair, the authors come right out and say that this book is far from a comprehensive treatment, and they assume that interested readers can do supplementary research on their own (very easy with an on-line encyclopaedia).
I began this book with a fair background knowledge of the subject; yet, I learned a lot of new information. Some of the most interesting things I learned were many new facts about vanilla; about the two major pathways by which corn was domesticated, and the naming of various corn stalks; how quinoa came to be first grown in Colorado, as the first place outside of the Andes; why quinoa was difficult to grow in Colorado, in spite of it being a high-altitude crop; and about many other interesting and potentially useful root crops from the Andes, which I had never heard of.
Twentyfirstfinger
This is a good look into some of the history American food. Primarily focusing on the assimilation of specific foods into European and Asia culture via the New World exploration. Some information about the native American use of these foods as well. Foods of interest include: vanilla, amaranth, chili peppers and cacao.
Jogas
Not a cookbook, but if you love to read about food history & culture, this one is a must-read.
Iell
Not what I had hoped it to be it focuses more on the foods of the Midwest n Mexico regions..
betelgeuze
A book like this is greatly needed by the americas, since Europe still believes that she has given everything to us. Unfortunately, the book is too short. A broader, more profound history of produce, products, etc that America has given the world is still needed.