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by Kermit Lynch
Download Adventures on the Wine Route: A Wine Buyer's Tour of France fb2
Beverages & Wine
  • Author:
    Kermit Lynch
  • ISBN:
    0374100926
  • ISBN13:
    978-0374100926
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1st edition (October 1, 1988)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Beverages & Wine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1165 kb
  • ePUB format
    1522 kb
  • DJVU format
    1565 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    139
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf doc mbr


Kermit Lynch's recounting of his experiences on the wine route and in the wine cellars of France takes the reader through the Loire, Bordeaux, the Languedoc, Provence, Northern and Southern Rhone, and the Cote d'Or.

Kermit Lynch's recounting of his experiences on the wine route and in the wine cellars of France takes the reader through the Loire, Bordeaux, the Languedoc, Provence, Northern and Southern Rhone, and the Cote d'Or. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

Nearly all wine books are written by experts whose intention is primarily to inform or to educate. They give little aesthetic pleasure. Kermit Lynch is certainly an expert, but his book, Adventures on the Wine Route, is also a great pleasure to read. In Kermit Lynch's small, true, delightful book there is more understanding about what wine really is than in everything else I have read.

In this singular tour along the French wine route, Lynch ventures forth to find the very essence of the wine world. In doing so, he never shies away from the attitudes, opinions, and beliefs that have made him one of our most respected and outspoken authorities on wine. Yet his guiding philosophy is exquisitely simple. Here, Kermit Lynch assures a whole new generation of readers,as well as his loyal fans,that discussions about wine need not focus so stringently on "the pH, the oak, the body, the finish," but rather on the "gaiety" of the way "the tart fruit perfume the palate and the brain.

Aerial view of residential neighborhood built on a hill, Berkeley, San Francisco bay, California; Getty. When he first established his Berkeley wine shop in 1972, he sold domestic wine and bought imported wine from distributors.

Wine and wine making. New York : Farrar Straus Giroux. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana.

Kermit Lynch is certainly an expert, but his book, Adventures on the Wine Route, is also a great pleasure to read. Kermit Lynch was born and raised in California. In 1972, he opened a retail wine shop and later began importing and distributing nationally. In 1988, he published Adventures on the Wine Route, which won the Veuve Clicquot Wine Book of the Year Award. His second book, Inspiring Thirst, was published in 2004.

Much like Bourdain, Lynch has been described as a r who doesn’t mince words

Much like Bourdain, Lynch has been described as a r who doesn’t mince words. He’s opinionated, witty and pleasantly straightforward. Like Bourdain, he’s also open about his past experimentation with drugs: Bourdain’s ‘80’s SOHO sounds similar to Lynch’s ‘60’s Berkeley. Richard Olney, the American foodie who traveled through Provence with Lynch, once described his friend as an old-fashioned bohemian with a remarkable nose and palate.

Kermit Lynch was raised in San Luis Obispo, but his name has become synonymous with French and .

Kermit Lynch was raised in San Luis Obispo, but his name has become synonymous with French and Italian wines  .

Kermit Lynch's recounting of his experiences on the wine route and in the wine cellars of France takes the reader through the Loire, Bordeaux, the Languedoc, Provence, Northern and Southern Rhone, and the Cote d'Or How the back stories, mystery and people that work the land, are therefore shaped by it make wine enjoyable not an arbitrary number assigned by a certain person in Monkton, Maryland. The French attitude toward wine has morphed, even since the writing of this book, with the globalization of tastes propagated by scores and a general "sameness" with everything in our world.

A noted wine importer offers a tour of the great wines and talented winemakers of France, as well as restaurants grand and small, and introduces a host of fascinating characters

Kerry
This book was really interesting about the wines of France in great deal. It helped me understand the differences in the wine variety, the manufacture and blending of wines and the process. It was interesting to note how the process from fruit to bottle is changing (not necessarily better for the consumer) to improve profit yield and many old time wineries are selling out to huge corporations who have nothing to do with wine making, only money making. This author is a gem in knowledge about the nuances of every variety, the minute detail of the processing and bottling and then shipping wines from France to California.He takes the reader on a tour of France, covering each wine region. Too bad I found this book 2 years after I visited many of the regions he so thoroughly describes. all the more reason to now go back and see it from a wine lover's perspective. I would highly recommend this book if you enjoy wines, what makes the wines we enjoy enjoyable or not. And he speaks about the history of France along the wine route!
Garr
Got thru about half of it. Lots of info, but most of it is about winemakers for whom the average reader could only HOPE to meet. I read the book during my trip through Provence, the Chateneuf-du-Pape region and lower Burgundy. I was able to take away a few key concepts, but for the average wine-loving traveler, Kermit Lynch's itinerary is an unobtainable dream. Kermit Lynch writes about his LONG-TIME relationships with individual vintners. He does discuss current practices which adversely affect the quality of estate-produced wines in these regions (on-site bottling that saps the character of the wine, which seems to be ubiquitous in the aforementioned regions) leading me to believe that most of the so-called Burgundy and Chateneuf-du-Pape appellations are nothing more than patrimony designed to preserve the status quo, but not the quality of the product. Despite my take-away and incomplete reading I'd still recommend.
HelloBoB:D
Written by a wine professional, Kermit Lynch wrote an ode to the fine art of wine making for us all to enjoy. In the process, he wrote of a time and place in France that has changed dramatically 25 years later. His French contacts are the small family owned vineyards that produce high quality, small yield old growth wine using the old French traditional methods. In the update written for the 25th anniversary edition, he brings us up to date with some of the characters we loved from the original edition. He regrets the passing of his old friends and, with it, the old school methods and traditions of traditional French winemaking. He regrets the profusion of the mass produced wine that we get today using short cut methods to produce large volumes of wine devoid of that signature French “taste”.
In “Adventures on the Wine Route”, Kermit Lynch wrote an ode to a way of life in French wine, of a time and place that was special and in so doing he wrote a love story for us all.
Brialelis
Who doesn't love Kermit? Mr. Lynch has done much for the American wine scene. He was a pioneer in finding and bringing world-class French wine to America. Without his presence our wine world would be much less compelling. Kermit Lynch is to be thanked for his passion and his contribution to wine in America. That said, his famed collection of stories and tales does show its age. Unfortunately, time has relegated Adventures on the Wine Route to a historical footnote. Realizing that he redefined the relationship between an importer and his catalog, many of the writings found in this seminal volume are a bit old and frayed. It's a wistful look at a wine world that really doesn't exist anymore. Good when it was here, but we've moved beyond. Thanks, Kermit, for everything you've done.
breakingthesystem
This is an interesting and fun book, especially for me, as one who loves good wine, but doesn't take the entire wine world too seriously. In the 1960's, living back East, I and my then wife enjoyed French wine which, in those days, was reasonably priced and often memorable. Mr Lynch, proprietor of a famous restaurant in Berkeley, California, began his wine travels in the 1970's and continued them in the '80s. This book tells the story of his adventures and of friends he made among the vignerons of France, mostly in the parts of the country less famous than Burgundy and Bordeaux. Mr. Lynch has his strong views, many of which seem sound to me. Wine going through the Panama Canal or across the country non-refrigerated is ruined. Filtering and fining is not good for wine. Apparently, the 1970's and 1980's saw a falling off in quality because of unfortunate fashions among consumers, which led to many questionable practices in the trade. I apparently experienced a golden age before the decline. This book is a joyful read and one may learn much which adds to one's enjoyment of wine.
Steep
To those who are just beginning to experience the pleasures of the grape, Lynch's book is a down-to-earth, no nonsense guide to the French wines. No longer the exaggerated subtleties of the palette where the minutest sensations are depicted as something obvious for all to taste, no longer the inclination towards full bodied wine that American wine critics have adopted as orthodoxy. Lynch brings us back to the very basics of enjoyment, that wine is a positive addition to the pleasures of the table, not something to be drunk alone. Thus wines should be evaluated for its contribution to a meal rather than a stand alone item, something we should all remember the next time we look a a review in the established wine journals.
Another thing that Lynch almost eulogies is the traditional methods of wine making that is fast disappearing in France. No one can do anything about this now. But one can and does eulogies.
That said, Lynch's tour of the wine route in France is a subjective one and can by no means claim to be a comprehensive coverage of the wines of France. For the experienced drinker who knows his own palette, the book offers refreshing insight (e.g. the section on Bordeaux) into something you suspected all along and is now confirmed. For the beginner drinker it can be too partial, too idiosyncratic to be of much practical use.