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by Margot Bettauer Dembo,Peter Conrad,Heinrich Boll,Anna Seghers
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World Literature
  • Author:
    Margot Bettauer Dembo,Peter Conrad,Heinrich Boll,Anna Seghers
  • ISBN:
    1590176251
  • ISBN13:
    978-1590176252
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    NYRB Classics; Main edition (May 7, 2013)
  • Pages:
    280 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1894 kb
  • ePUB format
    1932 kb
  • DJVU format
    1373 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    732
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Anna Seghers (Author), Margot Bettauer Dembo (Translator), Peter Conrad (Introduction), Heinrich Boll (Afterword) & 1 more.

Anna Seghers (Author), Margot Bettauer Dembo (Translator), Peter Conrad (Introduction), Heinrich Boll (Afterword) & 1 more.

Anna Seghers (Author), Peter Conrad (Introduction), Margot Bettauer Dembo (Translator), Heinrich Boll .

Anna Seghers (Author), Peter Conrad (Introduction), Margot Bettauer Dembo (Translator), Heinrich Boll (Afterword) & 1 more. Often as that heart-choking picture has been drawn before, both in factual reports and fiction, Miss Seghers's presentation will stir the reader's imagination to its depth.

Margot Bettauer Dembo has translated works by Judith Hermann, Robert Gernhardt, Joachim Fest . Her translations of Transit by Anna Seghers and Grand Hotel by Vicki Baum are both published by NYRB Classics.

Margot Bettauer Dembo has translated works by Judith Hermann, Robert Gernhardt, Joachim Fest, Ödön von Horváth, and Feridun Zaimoglu, among others. She was awarded the in Translator’s Prize in 1994 and the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize in 2003. Dembo has also worked as a translator for two feature documentary films: The Restless Conscience, which was nominated for an Academy Award, and The Burning Wall. Thomas Von Steinaecker was born in Germany in 1977.

MARGOT BETTAUER DEMBO has translated works by Judith Hermann . Transit, by Anna Seghers ; introduction by Peter Conrad ; translated by Margot Bettauer Dembo ; afterword by Heinrich Böll.

MARGOT BETTAUER DEMBO has translated works by Judith Hermann, Robert Gernhardt, Joachim Fest, Ödön von Horváth, Feridun Zaimoglu, and Hermann Kant, among others. Translated from the German by. Margot bettauer dembo. Introduction by. PETER CONRAD. ISBN 978-1-59017-625-2 (alk. paper).

Transit was the NYRB Classics Book Club selection for May 2013. Anna Seghers, introduction by Peter Conrad, afterword by Heinrich Böll, translated from the German by Margot Bettauer Dembo. What makes Miss Seghers's story so convincing is the human authenticity of her characters, and the masterly panorama of Vichy Marseille, that "tiny spigot through which the world flood of Europe's fleeing thousands sought to pour.

Anna Seghers Anna Seghers’s Transit is an existential, political, literary thriller that explores the .

Anna Seghers’s Transit is an existential, political, literary thriller that explores the agonies of boredom, the vitality of storytelling, and the plight of the exile with extraordinary compassion and insight. Margot Bettauer Dembo has translated works by Judith Hermann, Robert Gernhardt, Joachim Fest, Ödön von Horváth, Feridun Zaimoglu, and Hermann Kant, among others.

Anna Seghers’s Transit is an existential, political, literary thriller that .

Anna Seghers’s Transit is an existential, political, literary thriller that explores the agonies of boredom, the vitality of storytelling, and th. .

Margot Bettauer Dembo). 50 Replies New requirements and regulations can be introduced at any time dashing the . I read this book as one of my choices for Caroline and Lizzy’s German Literature Month

Margot Bettauer Dembo). Anna Seghers, born in Germany in 1900 to a Jewish family, fled from Europe following the German invasion of France in 1940. New requirements and regulations can be introduced at any time dashing the hopes of many refugees. I read this book as one of my choices for Caroline and Lizzy’s German Literature Month.

PEN Translation Prize Nominee for Margot Bettauer Dembo (2014). The nameless narrator of Anna Seghers' Transit is on the run having escaped a work camp

PEN Translation Prize Nominee for Margot Bettauer Dembo (2014). The nameless narrator of Anna Seghers' Transit is on the run having escaped a work camp.

Friday, November 15, 2013 . Transit Anna Seghers, introduction by Peter Conrad, afterword by Heinrich Böll, translated from the German by Margot Bettauer Dembo. Have you ever seen the classic American movie Casablanca? I love it and have seen it twice just in the last thirty days. Tombstone of Anna Seghers in BerlinAfter German troops invaded the French Third Republic in 1940, she fled to Marseilles and one year later to Mexico, where she founded the anti-fascist ', named after the German Jewish poet Heinrich Heine, and founded Freies Deutschland (Free Germany), an academic journal.

Anna Seghers’s Transit is an existential, political, literary thriller that explores the agonies of boredom, the vitality of storytelling, and the plight of the exile with extraordinary compassion and insight.      Having escaped from a Nazi concentration camp in Germany in 1937, and later a camp in Rouen, the nameless twenty-seven-year-old German narrator of Seghers’s multilayered masterpiece ends up in the dusty seaport of Marseille. Along the way he is asked to deliver a letter to a man named Weidel in Paris and discovers Weidel has committed suicide, leaving behind a suitcase containing letters and the manuscript of a novel. As he makes his way to Marseille to find Weidel’s widow, the narrator assumes the identity of a refugee named Seidler, though the authorities think he is really Weidel. There in the giant waiting room of Marseille, the narrator converses with the refugees, listening to their stories over pizza and wine, while also gradually piecing together the story of Weidel, whose manuscript has shattered the narrator’s “deathly boredom,” bringing him to a deeper awareness of the transitory world the refugees inhabit as they wait and wait for that most precious of possessions: transit papers.

Hadadel
From the first paragraph it puts you inside the mind of a man--the narrator--who is fleeing the Nazi advance into France in 1939. He gets to Marseille, where he has to decide whether he wants to try to leave on one of the last ships. Marseille is claustrophobic. It offers only boredom, muted terror, and the frenetic but likely senseless activity of convincing bureaucrats to issue visas and tickets to leave. We wait with the narrator in one dismal café or other where the mistral blows endlessly outside and you can't get a drink unless it's an "alcohol day."

Like Humphrey Bogart's character in Casablanca, the narrator is in love with a woman married to another man, but Marseille is no Hollywood movie set. Thoughts and feelings become unstable, then warp under the strain. The decision to leave Europe behind forever is not easy. A family where all except the grandmother have been granted visas refuse to leave even though the grandmother is certain to die within a few months and then all the others will all be interned. Marie, with whom the narrator has fallen in love, hesitates again and again because she refuses to accept that her husband the novelist Weidel is dead. The narrator too is confused. He says he doesn't want to leave, then puts all his energy and cunning into trying to get a transit visa.

We know little about the nameless narrator. He escaped first from a German concentration camp and then from a French work camp, but he does not seem ideological or especially political. He seems to be an ordinary person who just hates Nazis: "their murderous commands and objectionable insistence on obedience, their disgusting boasts." For this reason it's not possible to read Transit and think: "well, that wouldn't have happened to me back then" or "that can never happen to me." This is one of Seghers' major achievements.

One of the most moving moments is when the narrator reads Weidel's unpublished novel. It's the first novel the narrator has ever finished, and the beauty of the prose makes him feel that German is once more his language--the language of his childhood and youth, before the Nazis commandeered and disfigured it. This may not be what most people think of when they think of Nazi crimes, but for the narrator it is a very real, deeply personal loss. Perhaps Anna Seghers hoped her novel would reclaim and renew the German language for its first readers in the same way. Beautifully translated by Margot Bettauer Dembo, this English language version has the same simplicity and strength of feeling as Seghers' original prose.
Bradeya
I read this in preparation for helping a group of students thoroughly understand it, but early-on I knew many of them were going to give up before chapter three! There are many characters that you have to keep up on, and the multiple voices in the text are problematical, even for me, a
more-than-forty-years veteran of the classroom teaching English and American literature. In studying Seghers' background and her history did
shed light on why her characters are so conflicted, but even that information didn't help many of the students (high school). A solid knowledge of
WWII and a background in psychology and sociology would help!
Yggfyn
This is one of those rare books about WWII that is written before the war is over. Neither the author nor the protagonists know who will ultimately win. Is it better to be imprisoned by the Germans or the Free French? Will Hitler take Marseille? Which is worse for one's visa prospects -- having fought for Franco or having lost one's identification papers in a concentration camp? Does escaping from the Germans make you friend or foe? America is still neutral. South America is still free of Nazis. How long will that last? All of which adds to this wonderful story about humans, indeed an entire continent, in limbo.
Buzalas
AcaDec selection for the coming school year, never heard about WWII through this perspective, great read!
Joony
"Transit"'s protagonist has been in double exile/triple imprisonment. He is an anti-Nazi, German political refugee who has escaped two prison camps to fall into a wider confinement in the city of Marseilles awaiting an uncertain next destination. Amplifying the effect of this limbo is the man's assumption of another's identity. Every action he takes, every relationship he has, is done in another man's name and with another's man's resume.

Author Anna Seghers, herself a WWII refugee, has written the definitive story of displacement. The plight of the people continuously lining up for visas, waiting for ship departures and living off war and political rumor is palpable to the extreme, making the novel intensely uncomfortable at times. This is all in contrast to the rather clear evoking of wartime Marseilles, with its neighborhoods, harbor, cafes, shops etc. The characters in the story--all refugees or temporary residents--are like ghosts floating through the ancient and very solid city.

Thought-provoking and worth reading if for no other reason than to experience the feeling of total disconnection and uncertainty that are the lot of refugees of any period. It certainly provides some insight into what is happening today on Lampedusa or in Northern Syria or several regions of Asia. Things we should know about and react to.
Mettiarrb
"Transit" provides a rare picture of everyday life in the early WWII era, the life of those waiting and hoping to migrate out of Europe and away from war. Through an unusual love story the reader experiences the complications, anxiety, heartbreak and daily challenges of those in transit. The narrative from the perspective of one man makes the story easy to read and enjoyable even though the character himself isn't always particularly likeable.
Alsanadar
Great book
Awesome thanks