» » The Man Without Qualities Vol. 1: A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails

Download The Man Without Qualities Vol. 1: A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails fb2

by Sophie Wilkins,Burton Pike,Robert Musil
Download The Man Without Qualities Vol. 1: A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails fb2
World Literature
  • Author:
    Sophie Wilkins,Burton Pike,Robert Musil
  • ISBN:
    0679767878
  • ISBN13:
    978-0679767879
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage; First Printing edition (December 9, 1996)
  • Pages:
    752 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1220 kb
  • ePUB format
    1584 kb
  • DJVU format
    1915 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    795
  • Formats:
    lit azw docx lrf


Robert Musil (Author), Sophie Wilkins (Translator), Burton Pike (Translator) & 0 more.

Robert Musil (Author), Sophie Wilkins (Translator), Burton Pike (Translator) & 0 more.

The Man Without Qualities, Vol. 2: Into the Millennium.

The Man Without Qualities (German: Der Mann ohne Eigenschaften; 1930–1943) is an unfinished modernist novel in three volumes and various drafts, by the Austrian writer Robert Musil. It is typically considered to be one of the most significant novels of the twentieth century

A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails.

A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails. The Man Without Qualities, a brethren spirit of Mann's The Magic Mountain and Broch's The Sleepwalkers, is a monumental exploration of the malaise of modernity that was rotting the structure of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from within. The slim reeds of plot serve merely to frame the stunningly detailed and modulated dissection of Imperial society circa 1913-a mere year from cataclysm-that Musil performs with a precision and focus that is breathtaking in its relentless refulgence.

Set in Vienna on the eve of World War I, this great novel of ideas tells the story of Ulrich, ex-soldier and scientist, seducer and skeptic, who finds himself drafted into the grandiose plans for the 70th jubilee of the Emperor Franz Josef

Set in Vienna on the eve of World War I, this great novel of ideas tells the story of Ulrich, ex-soldier and scientist, seducer and skeptic, who finds himself drafted into the grandiose plans for the 70th jubilee of the Emperor Franz Josef. This new d in two elegant volumes-is the first to present Musil's complete text, including material that remained unpublished during his lifetime.

The Man Without Qualities Vol. 1: A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails.

ROBERT MUSIL THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES Translated from the . The man without qualities. Part I: a sort of introduction.

The man without qualities. Translated from the German by Sophie Wilkins. With an introduction by Jonathan Lethem. 1 From which, remarkably enough, nothing develops. 2 House and home of the man without qualities. 3 Even a man without qualities has a father with qualities. 4 If there is a sense of reality, there must also be a sense of possibility. 1: A Sort of Introduction and Pseudo Reality Prevails

The Man Without Qualities Vol. Robert Musil was destined for the army and was educated first at the military academy at Eisenstadt, in the Burgenland, and then at that at Weisskirchen (Hranice), in Moravia, the same grim school at which Rilke, only a very few years earlier, had been so desperately unhappy. Musil, about whom there was always something soldierly, both in spirit and in bearing, could stand up to such rigours.

Robert Musil, Sophie Wilkins, Burton Pike. Set in Vienna on the eve of World War I, this great novel of ideas tells the story of Ulrich, ex-soldier and scientist, seducer and skeptic, who finds himself drafted into the grandiose plans for the 70th jubilee of the Emperor Franz Josef.

Set in Vienna on the eve of World War I, this great novel of ideas tells the story of Ulrich, ex-soldier and scientist, seducer and skeptic, who finds himself drafted into the grandiose plans for the 70th jubilee of the Emperor Franz Josef. This new translation--published in two elegant volumes--is the first to present Musil's complete text, including material that remained unpublished during his lifetime.

wanderpool
Though widely regarded by literary critics as one of the giants of twentieth century literature, the Austrian writer Robert Musil remains relatively little known in this country. The two lengthy volumes of “The Man Without Qualities”, his magnum opus, appeared in German in the early 1930’s but were not published in English until 1953. He was at work on a third volume when he died in Switzerland in 1942 at the age of 61.

Set in culturally teeming pre-World War I Vienna, surrounded by an ancient but troubled and restless empire, the novel revolves around the life and thoughts of one Ulrich, a sarcastic observer of the decadent aristocratic set within which he moves. This is essentially a novel of ideas, and as such is far from an easy work to read. The limitless cultural and philosophical reflection is held together by only a thin and rambling narrative. But aphorisms abound the pondering and contemplation are often provocative and occasionally brilliant. Sample:
“If [someone] is told that something is the way it is, then he thinks: Well it could probably just as easily be some other way. So the sense of possibility …[is]….to attach no more importance to what is than to what is not.”

I remained enthralled despite the philosophical headwinds and continued through most of Volume One. Given sufficient energy, I intend to return to it and Volume Two after a period of rest.

Footnote: It has been said that a translation, like a mistress, can be faithful, or beautiful, but not both. The prose in this translation is often awkward and lumpy. I assume, therefore that it is faithful.
Darkshaper
Warning! You are sold "This new translation--published in two elegant volumes--is the first to present Musil's complete text." In fact it is ONE QUARTER of the total text. Of course, the only way to uncover the swindle is to buy the [Kindle] book - don't.
JoJoshura
The quintessential novel of ideas, I am simply astounded that I managed to get through the first 50 years of my life without knowing of this incredible book. Someone here noted that almost every review notes two things about this book: that is a novel of ideas and that it takes place in pre-World War I Vienna. The reviewer complained that a) it is much more than just an amazing collection of ideas and thoughts expressed brilliantly and b) when it occurred was irrelevant in that the ideas expressed by Musil are timeless and apply everywhere. I agree with the first comment but disagree completely with the second.

While it is true that much of Musil's extended discussion of modern technological life still applies a century later, one of the really fascinating aspects for me was Musil's revelations of what the psychology of "Kakania" was under the Hapsburgs that led to WW I. Musil is writing primarily during the period between the two wars and for him as for all of Europe during this time, the overwhelming catastrophe that was the first war had to have been a central concern for him. IMHO, to say that the setting of the novel is irrelevant is to massively diminish one of the many central concerns of Musil

As others have noted, Musil is a constant revelation writing in epigrams that strike one on almost every page. It is simply brilliant and one of the truly great works of 20th century literature, very much able to hold it's own with Proust and Mann. Not an easy read by any means (I have been at it for over a year), it is rare when a work rewards effort so admirably.
Ueledavi
Continues Musil's masterpiece, which combines the incisive character analysis of Marcel Proust with the biting cynicism of a Kafka or Andrei Bely, this volume also contains such a ridiculously large amount of draft material that editors of other authors' masterpieces must be green with envy. I would literally kill for an extra volume like this for In Search of Lost Time. The Man Without Qualities is not too shabby either though -- an underrated classic that slips under the radar but deserves to be mentioned in the same breath with the likes of Ulysses, Buddenbrooks, In Search of Lost Time, and any other groundbreaking modernist work
Gralsa
I have only just started reading this on kindle and can see the gentle rhythmic flow of the prose that promises much. However the kindle edition is absolutely "infested" with typo errors, to the extent that it is hard to read a passage smoothly due to the constant jolts of trying to work out what a word is actually meant to have been.
This is not a good look for whoever did the proof-reading for this.