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by John Cullen,Manuel de Lope
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World Literature
  • Author:
    John Cullen,Manuel de Lope
  • ISBN:
    1590513096
  • ISBN13:
    978-1590513095
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Other Press; Advance Uncorrected Proof edition (September 28, 2010)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1496 kb
  • ePUB format
    1266 kb
  • DJVU format
    1401 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    717
  • Formats:
    lrf txt rtf azw


Novels narrated by a voice that sees into the heart of every character are not unusual, but Manuel De Lope’s narrator sees into the heart of time.

Novels narrated by a voice that sees into the heart of every character are not unusual, but Manuel De Lope’s narrator sees into the heart of time. What has happened, what will happen, and what is happening right now are all revealed in the course of a sentence. Time, the destroyer of all, is the ultimate subject of this mellifluous novel.

Manuel de Lope was born in Burgos, Spain in 1949. At age fifteen he moved to Madrid where he now resides again, after having lived in Geneva, London, and the South of France for twenty-five years. In 1978 he published his first novel, Albertina en el país de los Garamantes, thus commencing one of the most treasured and significant careers in modern Spanish literature. John Cullen is the translator of many books from the Spanish, French, German, and Italian, including Enrique de Hériz's Lies, Yasmina Khadra's Middle East Trilogy (The Swallows of Kabul, The Attack, The Sirens of Baghdad), Christa Wolf's Medea, and Margaret Mazzantini's Don't Move. He lives in upstate New York.

John Cullen's translation, with but the occasional lapse, successfully carries forward this sense of a past ruling the .

John Cullen's translation, with but the occasional lapse, successfully carries forward this sense of a past ruling the present, ineluctably determining a future. His rendition of a scene combining birth and death merits the highest possible marks for memorability. Amid the current outpouring of Civil War fiction in Spain, the books of Manuel de Lope and María Barbal, author of the similarly lucid and fluid Stone in a Landslide, should be top of interested readers' lists. Calendars John Sergeant Southern Europe Spain.

By Manuel de Lope Translated by John Cullen. De Lope brilliantly reveals his incredible story through flashes of memory and emotion, told in a winding torrent that expresses the cumulative nature of both history and nostalgia. About The Wrong Blood. Category: Literary Fiction Historical Fiction. In the Basque Country in northern Spain, just before the Civil War, three men in dinner suits stop for a drink at a bar before continuing on their way to a wedding.

The wrong blood, by Manuel de Lope; translated by John Cullen. p. cm. eISBN: 978-1-59051-401-6 1. Spain-History-Civil War, 1936–1939-Fiction.

Manuel de Lope, John Cullen. On the cusp of the Spanish Civil War in a coastal village in the Basque country, three men stop off at Extarri's bar on their way to a wedding. There, a bizarre and seemingly incidental event marks the beginning of a powerful story about a bond and a secret that endures even in death. Abandoned by her parents shortly after the outbreak of war, sixteen-year-old Maria Antonia Extarri is left at the mercy of the soldiers. Meanwhile, Isabel enjoys a blissful honeymoon, but just a few months later her valiant Captain is shot as a traitor.

But de Lope’s languid sentences, artfully translated by John Cullen, continue to unfurl, and you find .

But de Lope’s languid sentences, artfully translated by John Cullen, continue to unfurl, and you find yourself sinking back into the narrative as if it were quicksand. On the face of it, the story, which begins just before the Spanish Civil War, is a straightforward one. María Antonia is indeed raped - by a sergeant marking his first wedding anniversary far from his wife. While the uncovering of secrets provides the spine of the narrative, its appeal lies in the way de Lope makes us question just how separate the past and present may really be. Dates are indeterminate ( The calendar of sentiments knows no certainties ); entire lifetimes are compressed into a single sentence.

Although de Lope has written over a dozen novels, this is the first to be translated into English. The cover is as pretty as a picture and screams 'Spanish.

John Cullen (Translator). should be top of interested readers' lists". I've seldom read a more sublime and disturbing novel".

Manuel de Lope’s books. Manuel de Lope, John T. Cullen (Translator). The Wrong Blood by.

In the Basque Country in northern Spain, just before the Civil War, three men in dinner suits stop for a drink at a bar before continuing on their way to a wedding. Their trip is interrupted when their leader, the wealthy Don Leopoldo, has a stroke in the restroom.This event, bizarre and undignified though it is, begins to weave together the lives of two remarkable women: the bride, the beautiful and distinguished Isabel Cruces, and María Antonia Etxarri, the bar owner’s adolescent daughter. Shortly after the outbreak of the war, María Antonia is raped and Isabel’s newlywed husband, Captain Julen Herraiz, is shot. Both women find themselves violently altered, alone, and pregnant. A crippled but wise local doctor is the only witness to the mysterious, silent agreement these women conclude in the loneliness and desperation of their mutual suffering. Many years later, a young student, grandson to Isabel, returns to the scene of the events to spend an innocent summer studying for law exams. As he goes about his work, he unwittingly awakens the ghosts haunting both María Antonia and the doctor, and through their memories the passionate stories of the past unfurl before the reader.   De Lope brilliantly reveals his incredible story through flashes of memory and emotion, told in a winding torrent that expresses the cumulative nature of both history and nostalgia.

Manazar
The Wrong Blood is the story of two women of different classes in Spain's Basque country: Maria Antonia Etxarri, the young daughter of a local innkeeper and Isabel Cruces Hernandez, who comes from a family of wealth and influence. During the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), their individual tragedies unexpectedly bring and then bind them together for the rest of their lives. Isabel falls in love with and marries an army captain, who is killed shortly afterwards, leaving behind not only Isabel but her unborn child. Maria Antonia, only a teenager, is raped when a group of soldiers take shelter at her father's inn. The local doctor, Felix Castro, is the central figure connecting them both. In the present, Miguel Goitia, law student and Isabel's grandson, is spending time at his grandmother's estate (which now belongs to Maria Antonia), a sanctuary of peace and quiet while he is preparing for his bar exam. His very presence there brings out memories of old wartime secrets that Miguel is not privy to -- and Castro is torn between telling him the truth about things or letting old memories lie dormant. It is also a story about loss, grief, the nature of class distinction, and as Dave Boling, author of Guernica and one of the blurbers wrote, about "... human survival at desperate times."

In terms of the writing, the direction of the plotline is a bit obvious once you begin reading, but that hardly matters in the long run. I only rarely find an author whose prose is so eloquent that I want to read the book again just to appreciate its beauty. And considering this is a translated version, well, I can only imagine how absolutely wonderful it must be in the original Spanish. The story is paced very well; it starts a bit slow, setting the overall tone immediately, while allowing the reader to absorb and appreciate small details that might otherwise be overlooked. The sense of time and place is evoked largely through the use of flashbacks, which take the reader seamlessly and skillfully through the hardships of war into the present and back again, without causing any interruption to the overall flow of the story. It is a book that will you find difficult to put down until the very end.

I recommend this novel to people who enjoy Spanish novels in translation, and who truly appreciate the beauty of the written word. It's definitely not a book for those who want something quick and easy, nor is it an action-packed novel that once you've read you'll forget. It's a book to be enjoyed slowly -- and kept on your shelf to visit again some day.
Nahn
I lived long and happily in Spain. This novel touches so many bases in the Spanish soul it's impossible to mention them all here. It's a book about social strata, about a ripping civil war, about deeply personal issues subsumed by the misery of the times. The character of the doctor (as protagonist) is excellently drawn. It's a terrific read. I will buy ANYTHING by Manuel de Lope that I can find.
Malalanim
I expected an amazing story and it could have been ... not sure if it could have been in the translation but the jumping around from Past to Present to in the middle was confusing and the story is told from about 6 different peoples point of views and you are left trying to figure it out. I wish it could have been a bit more streamlined as it had the potential to be such a great story but falls very short. Was very disappointed.
Мох
The Spanish Civil War (1936 - 1939), with its terrible effects on residents of the Basque country, was a complex and brutal war in which soldiers, sometimes neighbors, often found themselves fighting for different sides. Author Manuel de Lope obviously knows the landscape and the culture well, describing the overwhelming beauty of the land and mountains with an obvious love of nature, and the characters in his story with understanding and affection. Not a traditional war story, the author focuses instead on three characters who, though affected by the war, are peripheral to that bloody action--Maria Antonia Etxarri, the daughter of a former innkeeper from a nearby town; Dr. Felix Castro, a young, crippled doctor; and Isabel Cruces Herraiz, the bride (and later widow) of a young officer, all living in the village of Hondarribia. When Miguel Goitia, a young law student studying for his exams, arrives at Las Cruces sixty-five years after the Civil War, he is allowed to stay in the inn which was once the home of his grandmother, Isabel Herraiz.

Goitia, though reclusive and not involved in any activities, other than his studies, becomes the catalyst for the real story here, and as the action moves from the present back and forth to the time of the war, the other characters, now elderly, are inexorably drawn to him. Maria Antonia and Dr. Castro are privy to secrets involving Goitia, though he does not suspect this, and the big question is whether or not they feel he will benefit if these secrets are revealed.

Consummately romantic in a literary way, this novel has great appeal, and anyone who enjoyed Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon will find much of the style similar, despite the very different subject matter. The novel is dense with sensual imagery which recreates the magic of the landscapes and buildings, and as the action develops, this imagery creates often haunting atmospheres. His characters are well individualized within the limitations of the genre, and they often inspire sympathy and empathy. So smoothly does de Lope incorporate his descriptions, even as he is switching back and forth in time, that the novel at times feels more like music than prose.

Divided into four parts, the author focuses on different, overlapping characters in each section. Typically romantic story lines abound: the elegant and perfect wedding, the death of a hero, unexpected inheritances, secret identities, the lowly servant being lifted up, the good doctor making heartrending decisions which haunt his life, the comfort of memories, and the sensitive soldier who hates violence, among the many. Though the novel is fully developed and vibrant with life, both from nature and from its people, the secret at the heart of the plot is easy to figure out early. The author provides a good deal of obvious foreshadowing, and the characters often drop obvious hints. There is little suspense other than to know whether not the reader's guesses are correct. Fortunately, the vibrant imagery and many superb descriptions keep the reader attentive and involved, despite the obvious plot twists. Mary Whipple