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by David Grossman
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World Literature
  • Author:
    David Grossman
  • ISBN:
    067697421X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0676974218
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Knopf; 1ST edition (October 10, 2006)
  • Pages:
    155 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1845 kb
  • ePUB format
    1136 kb
  • DJVU format
    1758 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    480
  • Formats:
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David Grossman1 Disember 2007. From one of Israel’s most lauded contemporary writers, this book retells the myth of Samson-one of the most tempestuous, charismatic, and colorful characters in the Hebrew Bible.

David Grossman1 Disember 2007. Few other Bible stories feature as much drama and action, narrative fireworks and raw emotion: the battle with the lion; the three hundred burning foxes; the women he bedded and the one woman that he loved; his betrayal by all the women in his life, from his mother to Delilah; and, in the end, his murderous suicide, when he brought the house down.

Then I read David Grossman's little book. A well written book that examines the solar myth and psychology of Samson. David carries us deep into the mind-nay, the very heart-of this ancient hero, to uncover what makes him tick. Sampson has been transformed from a turbulent, macho man into a needy, troubled misfit. Looking both from a Biblical as well as a mythological point of view, the reader will find themselves exploring Samson as a human being, as a hero, and as an enigmatic psychological study in love and loss. It isn't the easiest book to digest, and while it reads quickly, it takes a bit to marinate in the depth of meaning.

Start by marking Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Lion's Honey, award-winning writer David Grossman takes on one of the most vivid and controversial characters in the Bible. Revisiting Samson's famous battle with the lion, his many women and his betrayal by them all, including the only one he ever loved

In Lion's Honey, award-winning writer David Grossman takes on one of the most vivid and controversial characters in the Bible. Revisiting Samson's famous battle with the lion, his many women and his betrayal by them all, including the only one he ever loved. Grossman gives us a provocative new take on the story and its climax, Samson's final act of death, brining down a temple on himself and three thousand Philistines.

Questions: David Grossman in conversation with Linda Grant - IQ2 talks - Продолжительность: 37:19 iqsquared . The Samson Myth is all about YOU - Продолжительность: 17:17 mathisen corollary Recommended for you. 17:17.

Questions: David Grossman in conversation with Linda Grant - IQ2 talks - Продолжительность: 37:19 iqsquared Recommended for you. 37:19. The Story Of Samson NKJV - Продолжительность: 23:56 Renew Your Mind Recommended for you. 23:56.

David Grossman is one of Israeli's pre-eminent novelists, perhaps best known for his book, "The Yellow Wind. And through his writings, as well as his advocacy, he serves as a conscious for a nation. Unlike the other volumes I have read in the Canongate series of Myths Retold, this book about the myth of Samson is not a novel, a retelling of an ancient myth into a modern setting, but rather a minute and scholarly examination of the biblical text, picking up every tiny nuance and finding significances in the way it is told that would escape.

LION’S HONEY The Myth of Samson David Grossman Translated from the Hebrew by Stuart Schoffman Authorised King James Version Printed by Authority Contents Title Page. Translated from the Hebrew by Stuart Schoffman. Authorised King James Version.

David Grossman was born in Jerusalem on January 25, 1954, is an Israeli author of fiction, nonfiction, and youth and children's literature.

Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson (The Myths) by David Grossman translation from Hebrew by Stuart Schoffman in 2006 published: 2005 format: 184 page paperback, including the KJV version of Samson. David Grossman was born in Jerusalem on January 25, 1954, is an Israeli author of fiction, nonfiction, and youth and children's literature. He is most known for his non-fiction work, The Yellow Wind.

Since that book's publication he has written a children's book, an opera for children . Lion’s honey : the myth of Samson.

Since that book's publication he has written a children's book, an opera for children and several poems. His 2014 book, Falling Out of Time, deals with the grief of parents in the aftermath of their children's death. Grossman studied philosophy and theater at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. After university he started working in radio, where he'd once been a child actor. Edinburgh; New York: Canongate, 2006, ISBN 1-84195-656-2.

In Lion's Honey, award-winning writer David Grossman takes on one of the most vivid and controversial characters in the Bible

In Lion's Honey, award-winning writer David Grossman takes on one of the most vivid and controversial characters in the Bible. Revisiting Samson's famous battle with the lion, his many women and his betrayal by them all - including the only one he ever loved - Grossman gives us a provocative new take on the story and its climax, Samson's final act of death, bringing down a temple on himself and three thousand Philistines.

A consideration of one of the Bible’s most powerful stories from a leading Israeli writer In this fascinating reexamination of the story of Samson, David Grossman goes beyond the surface of the familiar tale to look into what the life of this extraordinary man must have been like. What it felt like to have been “chosen” to release his people from the yoke of the Philistines, and yet alienated from them by his very otherness; what moved him to his acts of wild vandalism and his self-destructive passions; why he chose to keep some things secret, but not the most significant secret of all. We are left with the troubling knowledge that Samson bore too heavy a burden even for a man of his supernatural strength to bear alone.“There are few other Bible stories with so much drama and action, narrative fireworks and raw emotion, as we find in the tale of Samson: the battle with the lion; the three hundred burning foxes; the women he bedded and the one woman that he loved; his betrayal by all the women in his life, from his mother to Delilah; and, in the end, his murderous suicide, when he brought the house down on himself and three thousand Philistines. Yet beyond the wild impulsiveness, the chaos, the din, we can make out a life story that is, at bottom, the tortured journey of a single, lonely and turbulent soul who never found, anywhere, a true home in the world, whose very body was a harsh place of exile. For me, this discovery, this recognition, is the point at which the myth – for all its grand images, its larger-than-life adventures – slips silently into the day-to-day existence of each of us, into our most private moments, our buried secrets.”–from David Grossman’s introduction to Lion’s Honey

Vobei
I never liked Samson. I've said before that if the two of us meet someday in heaven, there will probably be a personality clash to end all clashes. I'm hoping that my new heavenly body won't be quite so easy to beat up.

Then I read David Grossman's little book. David carries us deep into the mind--nay, the very heart--of this ancient hero, to uncover what makes him tick. Sampson has been transformed from a turbulent, macho man into a needy, troubled misfit. A muscle-bound one, no less, which makes for an explosive combination.

I like him even less this way. I would shake Delilah's hand for uncovering his secret. No, not his long hair, but the inner child that longs to be normal, which she then carefully and deliberately manipulates.

Yeah, I'm fine with the tragic ending, Samson deserved it. Nevertheless, David's clever retelling succeeds in adding life to the myth. Kudos! David draws upon various Hebrew traditions to spice up Samson's twisted personality, then leaves the poor man without even a decent shrink. How else could the story end?

Sorry, David, I never did feel any sympathy for your guy. But I absolutely loved reading your story.
Ishnjurus
David Grossman is one of Israeli's pre-eminent novelists, perhaps best known for his book, The Yellow Wind: With a New Afterword by the Author. And through his writings, as well as his advocacy, he serves as a conscious for a nation.

"Lion's Honey, The Myth of Samson," is a careful examination of four chapters in the Book of Judges in the Old Testament, which are included at the beginning of his analysis. Grossman meticulously weighs each sentence, holds each to the light, seeing the nuance, what was said, what wasn't, who was there, who wasn't. He is given to conjecture also, but always identifies it as such, even to the proposition that Samson may actually have been the product of an affair between his mother, previously "the barren one," the woman of no name, prior to the arrival of an "angel," who may have been a flesh and blood Philistine.

The author also discusses the existential questions surrounding Samson; he is always the "outsider." He is also enmeshed in relationships with his people's overlord, and therefore enemy, the Philistines. He chooses a wife from them, who betrays him, and then goes to seek solace among them in Gaza, finding the only woman with a name in this drama, Delilah, who also repeatedly betrays him. His need for betrayal seems to be self-evident, and so Grossman naturally speculates how this relates to his mother.

It is a short, but very dense book, and much more could be said. Fortunately "my neighbor" to the north, R. M. Peterson, who recommended the book to me, has posted an excellent, detailed review which I highly recommend.

Many Americans would believe the words in Judges, as well as the rest of the Old Testament to be literally true. Grossman is quite clear where he stands on the issue, including "myth" in the sub-title to his work. And it is one that dates to the very beginning of historical time, around the 10th-11th century B.C., but still reverberates today, from the Cecile B. DeMille movie, "Samson and Delilah" to the Israeli Army units that bear the name of Samson. Grossman boldly labels Samson "in a sense, the first suicide-killer," and the implications seem clear that he is but a symbol for his people, who may use their strength to bring down the entire Temple of the Middle East upon them.

I just finished reviewing John Laurence's The Cat from Hue: A Vietnam War Story. He tried to end his 800 plus page tomb on an upbeat note- that maybe our political elites, as well as those they represent, had learned their lessons, and would not repeat the folly again, but would instead use "caution and prudence, maybe even humility, when considering military action against another country." Of course it didn't work out that way, and Grossman doesn't raise that hope, but simply poses the question: "Or in other words, why do human beings compulsively repeat destructive experiences, re-creating in the course of their lives the dysfunctional relationships and the self-defeating situations that arouse their worst, most toxic feelings?" (p. 131) Indeed, for at least 13 millennium.

An evocative read, highly recommended.
Bludworm
You thought you knew the Biblical story of Samson and Delilah. You didn't - not until you read this book.

Grossman is one of Israel's best novelists and he brings all of his creative insight into retelling the familiar story in a new way. The character of Samson, as a kind of muscle-bound Golem who is doomed from the moment of his conception, thrust into a role that he neither seeks nor understands, is at the center of this reinterpretation.

Grossman even sheds new light on the hero's name -- linking it to the Hebrew root "shimush" which means use or useful. God uses Samson for his own purposes. Samson is used by God without ever fully grasping how and why.

There are many mysteries embedded in this story. Why does Samson seek disastrous relationships with Philistine women -- the daughters of his enemies? Why does he give away his secret to Delilah? Why, if he is destined to lead the Israelites against the Philistines, does he never actually do so? Why does he follow each bout of frustrated sexual activity with an orgy of murder?

Grossman, with his deep psychological understanding of Samson's dilemma, provides answers and elucidation.

This is a slim volume and can be read in a couple of hours. At the end of that time, however, the reader will never view this complex tale in the same way again.
Onnell
I love mythology and biblical history and this was an interesting take on the Samson myth, exploring Samson's outsider-ness, and mixed relationship w/both his own clansmen and the Philistines. While Grossman has some interesting interpretations of Samson's possible motives for various parts of his story, there is no explanation whatsoever about why he would possibly tell Delilah the secret of his strength, especially after she already tried to set his enemies upon him twice. Nor is there any suggestion about why he would continue to love a wretched wench like that. Sounds like suicide, which is fine, arguably Socrates & Jesus of Nazareth used 3d parties to effectuate their own demise as well, but that would be a really interesting angle to explore. Grossman doesn't touch it. Still, short, interesting, moderately thought provoking.
Urtte
A well written book that examines the solar myth and psychology of Samson. Looking both from a Biblical as well as a mythological point of view, the reader will find themselves exploring Samson as a human being, as a hero, and as an enigmatic psychological study in love and loss.

It isn't the easiest book to digest, and while it reads quickly, it takes a bit to marinate in the depth of meaning. Samson is a not only a truly tragic figure, but also a messianic one. The parallels to the Jesus are evident and while not explicitly pointed out, are easy enough to see if kept in mind.

Worth the read.