Download Insatiable fb2

by Meg Cabot
Download Insatiable fb2
Women's Fiction
  • Author:
    Meg Cabot
  • ISBN:
    0061735086
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061735080
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    William Morrow; Reprint edition (June 7, 2011)
  • Pages:
    451 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Women's Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1572 kb
  • ePUB format
    1871 kb
  • DJVU format
    1555 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    731
  • Formats:
    lit docx doc lrf


Meg Cabot's modern sequel to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Learn more about the book.

Meg Cabot's modern sequel to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Until Meena finally meets a guy who doesn't seem to have an expiration date. or her worse nightmare just begun? Insatiable.

Meg Cabot blends trend with tradition to create a fresh, funny, pulse-pounding and poignant update of the dark eternal gothic romance, Dracula. Huffington Post Behind the Bite by Meg Cabot

Meg Cabot blends trend with tradition to create a fresh, funny, pulse-pounding and poignant update of the dark eternal gothic romance, Dracula. More from The Early Show "One of the terrific books that will keep you turning pages all summer long. Critical Praise for Insatiable. Huffington Post Behind the Bite by Meg Cabot. Insatiable-Related Interviews with Meg! Pop Matters Omaha World News BlogHer Crushable She Knows Chick Lit is Not Dead Forever Young Adult Woman's Day Simple Thrift - Good Egg Interview With Meg Cabot. Blockbuster Blurbs from the Blogosphere!

Insatiable by Meg Cabot.

Insatiable by Meg Cabot. Insatiable Series - Adult Fiction by Meg Cabot.

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With Insatiable, Meg Cabot has thrown her hat into the ring of paranormal fiction. She's started a series that is both about vampires, and about hating vampires and the vampire craze. I totally agree with what people have said - that she is cashing in both on the vampire craze, AND the big backlash against the vampire craze.

Meggin Patricia Cabot (born February 1, 1967) is an American author of romantic and paranormal fiction for teenagers and adults. She has written and published over fifty books and is best known for Princess Diaries

Meggin Patricia Cabot (born February 1, 1967) is an American author of romantic and paranormal fiction for teenagers and adults. She has written and published over fifty books and is best known for Princess Diaries. It was later made by Walt Disney Pictures into two feature films.

Head writer was really where the money was on a show like Insatiable. And she was sure the pressure wouldn’t cause her to have a nervous breakdown.

Chapter One. 9:15 . EST, Tuesday, April 13. Downtown 6 platform. East Seventy-seventh Street and Lexington Avenue. Head writer was really where the money was on a show like Insatiable. A woman’s voice came over the subway car’s loudspeakers to warn that the doors were closing. The next stop, she announced, would be Forty-second Street, Grand Central Station. Meena, having missed her own stop, stayed where she was.

Meg Cabot Insatiable. He was making a little joke. His grip on her hands was steady. She plays Victoria Worthington Stone on Insatiable. I write her dialogue. But it’s true about the bats and rabies. Meena felt oddly reassured by it. And by the little joke. I-it’s not, Meena stammered. Meena needed, she decided, to sit down. We may be just a soap opera, but we strive for authenticity in our plotlines. Or at least we used to, before Shoshona made head writer and caved to the demands of the sponsor, she just managed to stop herself from adding. I understand, he said, gently leading her past the grocery store where Jon had said the chicken delivery hadn’t been made.

Read Insatiable, by Meg Cabot online on Bookmate – When it comes to devouring her delightfully outrageous, phenomenally fun fiction, Meg Cabot’s fans are Insatiable! And now the New York Times be.

Read Insatiable, by Meg Cabot online on Bookmate – When it comes to devouring her delightfully outrageous, phenomenally fun fiction, Meg Cabot’s fans are Insatiable! And now the New York Times b. When it comes to devouring her delightfully outrageous, phenomenally fun fiction, Meg Cabot’s fans are Insatiable! And now the New York Times bestselling author of The Princess Diaries-not to mention a host of wonderfully winning grown-up novels like Queen of Babble, Big Boned, and Every Boy’s Got One-has a subject she can really sink her teeth into: vampires!

When it comes to devouring her delightfully outrageous, phenomenally fun fiction, Meg Cabot’s fans are Insatiable! And now the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Princess Diaries—not to mention a host of wonderfully winning grown-up novels like Queen of Babble, Big Boned, and Every Boy’s Got One—has a subject she can really sink her teeth into: vampires! A deliciously twisted modern-day sequel to Bram Stoker’s classic Dracula, Cabot’s Insatiable will leave you laughing…and hungry for more!


Efmprof
I have been a long time fan of Meg Cabot's and have read almost all of her books. I love her humor and her happy endings. Insatiable, unfortunately, didn't satisfy me with either.
I was a bit hesitant of reading this book because vampire fiction is not Cabot's field of expertise. The book started off very slowly and lacked her usual humor that has the tendency to pull me in. I did not enjoy her use of multiple points of view, and I especially hated reading the sections written in Alaric's voice.
Alaric was a downright awful character. He was the least developed of them all, his thoughts were crude and uneducated, and his manhandling of the heroine was despicable. He seemed like the epitome of toxic masculinity. The heroine, Meena, harped on vampire plot lines for being misogynistic, yet it was the human in this book who was the biggest misogynist in my eyes. He was way more controlling than Lucien was, under the guise of trying to "protect" Meena. He did not care about anything she had to say, until he realized she had powers that were of benefit to him.
Lucien, on the other hand, loved Meena for her mind from the beginning, and they had a lot in common intellectually and emotionally. Her powers were like an added bonus that connected them, but he never once used her for them. She didn't need her powers to give her value in his eyes, because she was already special to him.
I was hoping beyond hope that Cabot would stray from the typical love triangle used in other vampire fiction, like Twilight and True Blood. However, I was sorely disappointed. Not only did a love triangle work its way in, but Cabot used the worst character in the book as the third person in the triangle. It was most underdeveloped character versus most developed character, yet at the end Cabot seemed to say screw it all and set it up so that Alaric would get the girl.
I think Cabot was trying to go for a shock factor by having the human heroine end up with another human instead of her vampire lover. But if she wanted to do something different like that, she should not have made the vampire the best written character in the book. He had way more depth than any of them, arguably even more than Meena. He didn't deserve a crappy write out. Especially not if she was trying to imply that Meena was doing the feminist thing by leaving him - because Alaric was equally as problematic, if not more so, than Lucien.
Rgia
Meena Harper is having a really crappy day. First there was the girl on the subway, the one with the ridiculous plastic butterflies on her shoes. The girl who is going to be dead by the end of the week. That's Meena's gift, you see, though it's more of a curse to her way of thinking. When she looks into someone's eyes, she can see when and how they are going to die. And the plastic butterfly girl is going to die soon, and violently. Even though she was already late to work, Meena gave the girl her card, tried to warn her. It's the least she can do and the only way she can live with this sucky talent. Then she rushed off to work, which she shouldn't have bothered to do because her day just keeps getting worse and worse. The sponsors of Insatiable, the soap opera that Meena writes for, have decided that what the show really needs to boost the ratings is a vampire story line. And if there's one thing Meena hates, it's the current craze for vampires - the monster misogynist bastards.

The day goes from entirely crappy to completely bizarre when Meena takes her dog out for a walk and gets attacked by a swarm of bats. Attacked and then rescued by a tall, dark and sexy stranger, that is. And just when she's sure she'll never see him again, Meena discovers that her bat battler is actually Lucien Antonescu, a modern-day Romanian prince and the cousin to her neighbors. Lucien is everything Meena has ever wanted in a man and better still, when she looks at him she gets absolutely no hint of impending death. Actually, she gets no hint of death at all and apparently, there's a reason for that. Meena's dream man has his own dark secrets and they're about to swallow Meena's life whole and threaten everyone she loves.

I've read some very positive reviews of this book and I've also read some that are hyper critical. It's the latter I don't understand. This book is fun, people! It's not meant to be world-changing or life-affirming or anything other than pure entertainment. It's F-U-N. You want to have fun, don't you? Meg Cabot books are sassy, witty and laugh-out-loud funny. They are also incredibly well-written, although she doesn't always get enough credit for that. With Insatiable, Ms. Cabot has taken the craze for vampire fiction, mixed in a plot that is truly soap-opera worthy and created a novel that's humorous and exciting and also slightly ridiculous. Meena is a snappy heroine who does remarkably well with all of the crazy things that get thrown at her over the course of a few days. Lucien might be a 'good' vampire, but he's still a vampire - with all the darkness, mystery and mayhem that implies. Throw in an out-of-work brother, a ruggedly handsome (yet oh so annoying) vampire hunter and a cast of crazy, quirky friends, neighbors and creatures of the night and you have a truly enjoyable read.