» » Murder in the Museum of Man: A Norman de Ratour Mystery

Download Murder in the Museum of Man: A Norman de Ratour Mystery fb2

by Alfred Alcorn
Download Murder in the Museum of Man: A  Norman de Ratour Mystery fb2
United States
  • Author:
    Alfred Alcorn
  • ISBN:
    1581952309
  • ISBN13:
    978-1581952308
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Steerforth; Reprint edition (January 6, 2009)
  • Pages:
    273 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1864 kb
  • ePUB format
    1766 kb
  • DJVU format
    1500 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    993
  • Formats:
    docx rtf mobi docx


Mobile version (beta).

Mobile version (beta). The Counterfeit Murder in the Museum of Man: A Norman De Ratour Mystery. Download (mobi, 663 Kb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Главная The Counterfeit Murder in the Museum of Man: A Norman De Ratour Mystery.

Before one can do justice to Alfred Alcorn's third Norman de Ratour mystery novel, it helps to haul out such .

Before one can do justice to Alfred Alcorn's third Norman de Ratour mystery novel, it helps to haul out such adjectives as smart, sharp, fresh, sly, wise, original, and wildly funny. Alcorn can keep a story moving with the swiftness of a dirty look and the brilliance of a fine satire. At the start of Alcorn's uneven third Norman de Ratour mystery (after 2009's TheLove Potion Murders in the Museum of Man), Norman, the Museum of Man's director and the book's bloviating narrator, discovers a murdered man in a parked car near the museum, located in the New England town of Seaboard. The Love Potion Murders in the Museum of Man: A Norman De Ratour Mystery. Download (mobi, 529 Kb).

Book 3 of 3 in the Norman de Ratour Mystery Series. Before one can do justice to Alfred Alcorn's third Norman de Ratour mystery novel, it helps to haul out such adjectives as smart, sharp, fresh, sly, wise, original, and wildly funny. Set in a mythical academic institution (read Harvard) lucky readers of this novel will meet and get to know characters they won't soon forget-especially Alphus, the most memorable of contemporary philosophers.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 553 Kb. 510 Kb. 519 Kb. Murder in the Museum of Man. Alcorn Alfred. 525 Kb. 230 Kb.

A Norman de Ratour mystery"-Cover. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 1, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

When Norman de Ratour discovers the body of Heinrich von Gr?mh in a car outside his beloved Museum of Man, he knows he faces a sticky public relations mess. What he doesn't know yet is that the gun used to kill the honorary curator is his own Smith & Wesson revolver. Implicated, publicly embarrassed and with his life's work in danger, Norman becomes the prime person of interest on the list of unusual suspects.

So writes Norman de Ratour, the somewhat effete, occasionally waspish, wholly engaging, and eventually victorious hero of this delightful first mystery. Norman is the recording secretary at the Museum of Man, which is attached to Wainscott University in the New England town of Seaboard.

Dean Cranston Fessing, dispatched from Wainscott University to investigate the finances of the neighboring Museum of Man, has been murdered. Not only that, but his grisly remains bear the unmistakable mark of preparation as haute cuisine. Norman de Ratour, museum recording secretary and unlikely sleuth, sets out to uncover a bubbling cauldron of clues in this hilarious satire of academic life and contemporary social issues, a stew of murder, cannibalism, political posturing. and high camp.

Keel
Parts of the book were hilarious. I laughed out loud while reading about the meetings of the Oversight Committee. They were just a little bit more absurd, but much funnier, than some of the academic meetings I have attended. And parts of the book were deeply moving. A most satisfying read.
Jox
This book was hilarious; I enjoyed it greatly. Alfred Alcorn weaves a murder mystery into a story of the kind of rivalries, personalities, and department politics that can characterize the Ivory Tower. Indeed, I felt that the murder mystery was second to the interesting characters that make up Murder in the Museum of Man. The plot unfolds from the personal log of the main character, Norman A. de Ratour, the recording secretary of the Museum of Man. Mystery and detective stories are usually formulaic in that the characters change very little. For example, there is no meta-arc of Sherlock Holmes through the stories where he winds up a as much different man than when he started. Here, then, in this sense, this novel is not a murder mystery! Norman is a much different man at the end of the novel than he was at the beginning and following his character arc is what made this an excellent and enjoyable read.
Snake Rocking
It is with anxious trepidation that I approach the task of writing this review, my hands hovering above the keyboard (part of a D*** system equipped with an impossibly complex W***** platform created for academics, given that the University insists upon uniformity in the matter of computers and one is not allowed any other brand; unless, of course, one has a government grant for research in the natural sciences) as I contemplate the intricate pathways of thought, the microscopic attention to detail (of course one cannot dine at the Faculty Club if one's trousers have been ripped by an out of control chimpanzee at a formal reception in the courtyard!), and the exquisitely hesitant self-consciousness of the introvert, sensing and thinking psychological typology of the narrator, who none the less contains within himself a stubborn mind consecrated to the protection and continuance of tradition. In short, hesitant he may seem to be, but in fact he lives for closure and certainty.

As I made my way through this literary maze, reminiscent of the garden mazes so valued in the 19th Century equally by the English and the French, although each nation in its own peculiar way, I found myself repeatedly reaching for this or that volume of the Unbridged Oxford Dictionary (yes, I know it is online, but I much prefer the heft of each volume upon my lap and the feel of the acid free paper in my hands), in order to appreciate fully the writer's complete mastery of the English language together with academic Latin still employed so commonly in the natural sciences and the literature of languages having their grounding in Proto Indo-European, although I was disappointed and somewhat taken aback at the lack of references from Semitic and Asian languages, each of which has a literary tradition rooted further back in history than current variants of the English language (which indeed has plentifully cannibalized words from nearly every other language of the world).

In brief, if academia knows such a concept as "in brief," this novel is a masterpiece of satire, exposing all the foibles of university life as well as neatly parodying the classic mystery novel. In the midst of the author's unrelentingly pedantic silliness the reader will find sufficient raunchy sexuality and profound insight into the human condition to satisfy his or her most base desires and refined values.

When taking up this book, be sure to have at your side a bottle of fine vintage wine, or perhaps perfectly aged brandy, or maybe a bottle of your favorite light beer (okay, even a heavy beer). Or hot chocolate or aromatic coffee. In summertime surely one might lapse into a gin and tonic or cold ginger-ale. Don't forget the plate of gourmet cheeses (if necessary, sliced American or a pimento cheese spread will do) and British crackers and crusty French bread (or saltines or wheat thins, what the heck). Take your time and enjoy this book, a novel of severe profundity (nudge, nudge, wink, wink, get it? Got it? Good!).

Respectfully submitted,

Hrodobertus Aestivale, BA, MA, MDiv, PhD.
Anyshoun
This is a wonderful and hilarious book. More satire than murder mystery, it is a precisely accurate send-up of academic over-reaching, in the tradition of Kingsley Amis (Lucky Jim) and Richard Russo (Straight Man). Also, Norman Detour (sic) is a beguiling hero; you cannot help but love him. I will buy more of his mysteries, though now that his adventures with Elsbeth are somewhat resolved, I can only imagine where he will go next. Thank you, Alfred Alcorn (a pen name?) for a wonderful reading experience!
Thozius
From page 1, I was tempted to quit reading this book. I convinced myself that although the book was extremely slow, it must get better,so I continued reading. I was wrong, this book never did get better. More care was taken describing the characters than was taken for the plot.
I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone.