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by Arthur Nersesian
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United States
  • Author:
    Arthur Nersesian
  • ISBN:
    0060548827
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060548827
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harper Perennial; 1 edition (July 29, 2003)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1818 kb
  • ePUB format
    1542 kb
  • DJVU format
    1669 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    953
  • Formats:
    txt azw lrf lrf


I still cared enough about Orloff Trenchant, the protagonist in Chinese Takeout, to read the book through until the last page, although I found myself skimming some pages quickly.

I still cared enough about Orloff Trenchant, the protagonist in Chinese Takeout, to read the book through until the last page, although I found myself skimming some pages quickly. The relationship between Orloff and a junkie named Rita is less than convincing. In other Nersesian works, especially Dog Run, I felt far more connected to the main characters, and in fact, Dog Run had me laughing in self-revelation as the story unfolded. I felt no such connection to Orloff Trenchant, although he was certainly a likable enough character.

Arthur Nersesian is an American novelist, playwright, and poet. Nersesian is of Armenian and Irish descent

Arthur Nersesian is an American novelist, playwright, and poet. Nersesian is of Armenian and Irish descent His novels include The Fuck-up, Manhattan Loverboy, Dogrun, Chinese Takeout, Suicide Casanova and Unlubricated. He has also published a collection of plays, East Village Tetralogy. He has written three books of poems and one book of plays. In 2005, Nersesian received the Anahid Literary Prize for Armenian Literature for his novel Unlubricated.

Chinese takeout : a novel. by. Nersesian, Arthur. urn:acs6:rs:pdf:199-9f6667f5445e urn:acs6:rs:epub:672-50018d3aff78 urn:oclc:record:1029285175. Duke University Libraries.

Chinese Takeout book. This is the fourth novel I've read by Nersesian, a writer obsessed with NYC for all the right reasons. Loved this book and Arthur Nersesian! His style of writing is descriptive with witty comparisons that his readers can completely relate t. truly felt I was living the life of the character. The style is very much like his earlier stories-a first-person trip through the weirder, darker ( the vanishing) sides of the city.

Arthur Nersesian is the author of six novels, including the smash hit The Fuck-Up (MTV/Pocket Books), Chinese Takeout (HarperCollins), Manhattan Loverboy (Akashic Books), Suicide Casanova (Akashic Books), and dogrun (MTV/Pocket Books). He lives in New York City. Nersesian is of Armenian and Irish descent. His novels include The Fuck-up, Manhattan Loverboy, dogrun, Chinese Takeout, Suicide Casanova and Unlubricated. Staten Island is the Spanish version of The Swing Voter of Staten Island, published by Alpha Decay in 2010.

Chinese Takeout : A Novel by Arthur Nersesian (2003, Paperback). Ruined City: A Novel (Chinese Literature Today Book Series),, Jia Pingwa, Excel. Customs services and international tracking provided. Blood and Steel, Wu Dao Kuang Zhi Shi 1-14 Traditional Chinese Novel by Josev.

Katie Tisch needs your help with Harper Collins Publishers: Publish Arthur Nersesian's new novel. Join Katie and 6 supporters today.

We need to stand up and show Harper Collins that we still want to read- and we want another amazing work from one of the most influential writers of our time. Finding the key glimmer of hope in the face of humiliation is the Nersesian trademark, present in all his books from The F ck-up to Chinese Takeout, which are set against a New York backdrop that seems to disappear almost as fast as Nersesian can get it on the page. Katie Tisch needs your help with Harper Collins Publishers: Publish Arthur Nersesian's new novel.

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From the author of the cult classic The Fuck-Up comes a vicious new tale of art, drugs, love, and death on the Lower East Side.

Orloff Trenchant is a painter who sells books on West 4th Street in Manhattan and is obsessed with mastering his craft. Desperate for cash, Or agrees to take a commission no one else will touch: he has three weeks to carve a headstone for a recently deceased restaurateur -- a Chinese takeout box. As Or attempts to make his deadline, he navigates among a toxic mix of fellow artists, struggling gallery owners, bloodsucking art dealers, his politically active friends, and a haunting addict poet whose life is more out of control than Or's own.

Nersesian's prose is sparkling and hypnotic in this brutal and comic story that will make you wonder if life and art are two different things.


Swiang
In the spirit of good art, Chinese Takeout is oddly named, conflicting and inconveniently dramatic -- all said, it makes for a great novel. Arthur Nersesian writes such beautifully crafted prose that often times his words float like graceful city poetry. In this story about a starving artist, I found myself divided on how much I liked and was willing to tolerate the main character. "Or" is a package of close calls with death and degradation, sacrificial in his passion for being an illustrator-painter-sculptor, and practically un-realizing in his potential to not give into his fears of conformity - but to conquer them in a way that would leave him regarded as successful in life (not to be confused with art). Instead, he focuses on love as an idea, art as a struggle and money of little value.

I read this book quickly, but found myself stopping to appreciate sentences packed with truths and considerations. Great book, in fact, the best of four I've read so far by this author. (The F-up, Unlubricated and Swing Voter)
Early Waffle
It isn't a page turner but it draws you into the gritty, drab, lowly life of a struggling artist throughout. I've read it a few times now and i've enjoyed it each time. But i'm a Nersesian fan, so take my review at that.
Vrion
boring, slow
Gugrel
Another great book by my favorite author. He never disappoints. If you like raw and honest fiction, you'll love this book. It exudes the energy of alphabet city.
Nagis
I am presently working my way through the fiction of Arthur Nersesian but chose to review Chinese Takeout having found it to be the most fully realized version of this author's conception of how unrecognized artists struggle to survive their art in downtown New York City. Nersesian, whose prose frequently reminds me of the late Charles Bukowski's best writing (Women, Post Office), devotes each novel to a different art form. The Unlubricated, for example, takes up the craft of stage production and acting while Dogrun's protagonist is an aspiring writer. Chinese Takeout is about a painter-sculptor and is marvelously evocative of the bohemian studio scene within which the book's 'hero' circulates while trying to scrape out a subsistence living. Nersesian himself is a very painterly writer whose febrile imagination provides an endlessly entertaining and poignant storyline. This aspect of his talent insistently propels one through the pages of Chinese Takeout but it is the undertow of the writing, the uncompromising exploration of love in all its most irrational manifestations, that distinguishes this writer and separates him out from the crowd. I rarely read a book which galvanizes me to seek out the entire literary output of an author but I was hardly finished with The Unlubricated before I secured copies of Nersesian's five other novels. They all investigate similar terrain but from distinct vantage points. They are each, in their own way, a joyous excursion into a sequestered world of youthful abandon.
Dogrel
Chinese Takeout is a very readable and entertaining novel of a struggling artist named Orloff Trenchant, known as Or. Or is among the many downtown New York City artists trying to climb out of poverty and obscurity. As the novel begins, Or is quickly plummeting to new depths in his fledgling career. His girlfriend dumps him for a wealthy art collector, probably the worst insult possible to a bohemian artist. Meanwhile he is living in a broken down van and his only regular income is selling used books on the streets. Chinese Takeout is not big on plot; it is a meandering but observant look at life on the streets in this rather fascinating subculture. All of the action takes place over a couple of months during the end of 2000; the controversial presidential election of that year is in the background for much of the novel. Arthur Nersesian, who has written a couple of other books with a similar theme, creates several interesting characters in addition to Or, including Rita, the heroin addict with whom Or becomes infatuated and Shade, the older artist who lets Or sublet his loft. The book effectively evokes the worldview of the artist, who sees life in vivid, emotionally-charged and uncompromising terms. On the other hand Or and some of the other artists can also be arrogant and self-absorbed in their self-conscious quest for authenticity. The main challenges Or faces during the time we spend with him are to sculpt a headstone in a few short weeks (no easy matter) and the roller coaster ride of being in love with a self-destructive addict. Chinese Takeout is a fast read, always interesting and sometimes thought-provoking. I wouldn't call it an especially deep or memorable book, but while I was reading it I had trouble putting it down.
Hilarious Kangaroo
While I enjoyed reading Chinese Takeout, it wasn't nearly as engaging as the earlier books written by Arthur Nersesian. The main character isn't as compelling as the one in The F--- Up, which is one of my all-time favorite modern fiction books.

I still cared enough about Orloff Trenchant, the protagonist in Chinese Takeout, to read the book through until the last page, although I found myself skimming some pages quickly. The relationship between Orloff and a junkie named Rita is less than convincing. In other Nersesian works, especially Dog Run, I felt far more connected to the main characters, and in fact, Dog Run had me laughing in self-revelation as the story unfolded. I felt no such connection to Orloff Trenchant, although he was certainly a likable enough character.

To sum up this novel, another Amazon reviewer already put it better than I could, suggesting that this book tastes as good as your average Chinese takeout meal, but the only problem is that an hour later, you're hungry all over again.