Download The Lost Father fb2

by Mona Simpson
Download The Lost Father fb2
United States
  • Author:
    Mona Simpson
  • ISBN:
    0394589165
  • ISBN13:
    978-0394589169
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Knopf; 1st edition (January 21, 1992)
  • Pages:
    505 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1187 kb
  • ePUB format
    1809 kb
  • DJVU format
    1505 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    474
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi rtf lit


Acclaim for mona simpson’s. Simpson i. born writer

Acclaim for mona simpson’s. born writer. She has a sterling sense of observation, emotional as well as physical, and you can feel her working a scene between her hands like a cherished stone. Mayan’s voice, chronicling the Proustian details of her life, is what gives the novel its weight and texture. In the hands of a writer as agile, as possessed as Mona Simpson, Mayan becomes the voice-over for her whole worl. xquisite heartbreaking. Gail Caldwell, Boston Globe.

I enjoy Mona Simpsons books for the same reason I am lukewarm about this one. Character development is always well done and the stories are in depth. It becomes painful to read (which is OK), but then it becomes tedious (not so OK). I found myself going from sympathetic to Mayan's pain to thinking that she deserved what she got. Maybe it was my own reaction that I disliked about the book. I took an act of will to finish the novel.

The Lost Father is a novel written by American novelist Mona Simpson. It also contains a fictionalized portrait of her mother, Joanne Carole Schieble. Jandali and Schieble are Steve Jobs' birth parents (although this fact does not appear in the novel).

All the guests were gone. The paper sounds of their last good nights, called from outside, had fallen and settled long ago. It was late. It was late url on her bed, the dress a tangled mess on the floor, Tom Harris enrapt inside it, his tail beating a steady knocking rhythm. I’d come upstairs to change. I had a thing about dressing up. As soon as the party was over, I put on my jeans and big socks and a loose shirt. I couldn’t lounge around in a tuxedo, even one Pat was going to throw out the next day.

Mona Simpson is the author of Casebook, Anywhere But Here, The Lost Father, A Regular Guy, Off Keck Road, and My Hollywood. Off Keck Road won the Heartland Prize from the Chicago Tribune and was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. She has received a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Guggenheim grant, a Lila Wallace–Reader's Digest Writers’ Award, and, recently, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Simpson is on the faculty at UCLA and also teaches at Bard College. Библиографические данные. The Lost Father Vintage Contemporaries.

The majority of people who gamble, gamble small. And even the big winners. I was in Monte Carlo once and I saw one of the young Saudi princes win fifty thousand dollars.

The lost father, . 8. The majority of people who gamble, gamble small. And the owner of the casino sent a case of the best champagne to his room on ice. So I said to the owner, the guy just cleaned you out and you’re sending him champagne? And he said, oh, it’ll be back, that money’s just out with him on loan. On a high-interest loan. You should run a casino, you know about it all.

Father Sean is a Roman Catholic priest who ministers at St. Jerome's Catholic School. He was the priest who was educating Bart Simpson in the Catholic Church. Bart was sent to St. Jerome's after being falsely expelled by Principal Skinner who blamed Groundskeeper Willie's prank on him from Springfield Elementary.

The Lost Father book. The skill with which Mona Simpson writes Mayan's voice is astounding. Use of imagery makes descriptions almost poetic at times, yet no less believable and all the more vivid. The empathy with which Mayan describes the people around her is eye-opening. The themes in this book are layered intensely: Mayan lets men, from her father to her boyfriends, control her life.

series Vintage Contemporaries. Books related to The Lost Father. In her highly acclaimed first novel, Anywhere But Here, Simpson created one of the most astute yet vulnerable heroines in contemporary fiction.

In her highly acclaimed first novel, Anywhere But Here, Simpson created one of the most astute yet vulnerable heroines in contemporary fiction. Now Mayan Atassi--once Mayan Stevenson--returns in an immensely powerful novel about love and lovelessness, fathers and fatherlessness, and the loyalties that shape us even when they threaten to destroy us. Now a woman of twenty-eight and finally on her own in medical school, Mayan becomes obsessed with the father she never knew, leading her to hire detectives to dredge up the past, thus eroding her savings, ruining her career, and flirting with madness in a search spanning two continents. "Ratifies the achievement of Anywhere But Here, attesting to its author's...dazzling literary gift and uncommon emotional wisdom."--New York Times"A breathtaking piece of fiction; Simpson is a writer who can break our heart and mend it in the same sentence."--Cleveland Plain DealerFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

Domarivip
If you liked Anywhere But Here - and I did - you'll probably like this. This is a loose sequel and like other reviewers have pointed out, some minor details of the main character have changed. But the general tone and pacing of this book are generally the same, and it picks up roughly where the first book ended.

I really didn't see the need for this book and Simpson doesn't bother much in setting up the story for anyone unfamiliar with it but whatever. It's slow, it's leisurely and you can spend another few weeks getting absorbed in it.
Kalv
I enjoy Mona Simpsons books for the same reason I am lukewarm about this one. Character development is always well done and the stories are in depth. In The Lost Father, a sequel to Anywhere But Here, I think she goes too far with Mayan's thought process while searching for her father. It becomes painful to read (which is OK), but then it becomes tedious (not so OK). I found myself going from sympathetic to Mayan's pain to thinking that she deserved what she got. Maybe it was my own reaction that I disliked about the book. I took an act of will to finish the novel.
Zeus Wooden
Spoiler alert: The Lost Father is found on page 451 and the trip getting there is the most tedious ever. We flashback frequently to main character Mayan's childhood or recent past. We travel all over, searching for the father and getting way too involved in all the people we meet along the way. And very little of it is actually necessary to get to the point of the story.

Mona Simpson writes and writes and writes. We have a scene where she's in a phone booth, and she describes to us various strangers who walk by. We are told what color irrelevant items in a room are. We are given descriptions of locations and people at length. Everybody in this book is crazy in a different way, and no surprise, after all this, the father is a disappointment, which we all knew going in. There were plenty of clues. And Mayan becomes the type of daughter you don't want to find you. She wants a $900 pearl necklace from him.

I try not to read much fiction because much of it is like this, too much useless information that the plot line doesn't need. Short stories become very, very long novels when a "writer" tells a story. Life is too short for this. But I read this because I knew that it is actually not fiction. The Lost Father is Steve Jobs' father and I wanted to see what it was about him that made Jobs' take no interest in meeting him. Well, that much you find out. But omg, what a tedious trip to get there.
Virtual
Best
Yozshunris
M. Simpson is one of the most intelligent, lyrical and emotionally-profound writers working today. This book is about an obsession that drives a young woman's life, an obsession as powerful and heartbreaking and life-destroying as alcoholism or gambling. Once she opens those yellow pages, she's sunk. While I may have wanted Mayan, at times, to do things differently, she simply could not, and her inability to derail her obsession introduces a suspenseful, dark curiosity: just how far she will go? Simpson tells Mayan's story with an acute eye for detail and such fresh, imagistic, musical prose that there are pleasures on every page. While reading this book, I lived and moved in a different consciousness--not always a safe place, sometimes a frustrating one, but invariably compelling, revelatory, and emotionally resonant.
Kikora
Because I can not relate to the protagonist plight or situation, I gave a low ratings based on my experience and understanding of the plot, execution and the deliverance of a ending of this novel.
Siatanni
Mona Simpson's somewhat autobigraphical novel.
She is the sister of Steve Jobs. Both were adopted.
Gives some insight into her reaction to that situation
Despite a back-cover claim that the protagonist of this novel is the same as in Simpson's first book "Anywhere but Here," I had trouble believing that.

For starters, the young medical student generally goes by Mayan. It takes quite some pages to reveal that some people also call her Ann -- the only name she was ever called int he first book.

Then, there is Mayan/Ann's childhood. In "ABH," she seemed to spend most of her time with her cousin Ben. In this book, Ben warrants a few passing mentions, but for the most part, Ann spends all her time with Emily and Mai linn -- characters never before mentioned. It's like Simpson has written one character with two different childhoods.

Still, a number of things remain consistent, such as Ann's dysfunctional mother Adele and her quietly strong grandmother Lillian. It's not enough, though; as Simpson's writing is strong, she might simply have decided to create an entirely different character rather than striving for a sequel that didn't quite gel.

As for the main plotline itself -- Mayan's search for the father who abandoned her as a child -- it's too drawn out. For reasons not clearly understood, Mayan has spent most of her life anticipating her father's reappearance; as a woman in her mid-twenties, however, she is nearly obsessed with a search for a man who is a virtual stranger. It takes a long time (and many, many pages) for Mayan to finally locate the man -- and when she does, Simpson does not really provide any reasons for the character's actions.

While this is hardly the worst book ever, I wouldn't really recommend it. Your time can be better spend elsewhere.