Download The Leftovers fb2

by Tom Perrotta
Download The Leftovers fb2
United States
  • Author:
    Tom Perrotta
  • ISBN:
    0312358342
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312358341
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (August 30, 2011)
  • Pages:
    355 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1934 kb
  • ePUB format
    1997 kb
  • DJVU format
    1791 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    677
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf lit rtf


The Leftovers is a 2011 novel by American author Tom Perrotta chronicling life on earth after a rapture-like event takes some and leaves others behind.

The Leftovers is a 2011 novel by American author Tom Perrotta chronicling life on earth after a rapture-like event takes some and leaves others behind. The billions left behind are all touched by the loss of loved ones in the "Sudden Departure", compounded by the significant social and philosophical concerns and implications of what it means to be left behind, when others were chosen. A television adaptation premiered on HBO on June 29, 2014.

Home Tom Perrotta The Leftovers. A lot of people say it the other way, Max pointed out. They say the rest of us are the Rejects. That sucks, too. They were quiet for a while.

Tom Perrotta, our Balzac of the burbs, has come up with a wild premise for his engaging, entertaining new novel

Tom Perrotta, our Balzac of the burbs, has come up with a wild premise for his engaging, entertaining new novel. Suddenly, a huge number of people vanish from this earth. With his newest novel, The Leftovers, Perrotta ponders an interesting question: what if the Rapture happened, but not all of the religiously devout were taken, but instead, a random, unexplainable group of people disappeared? How would the rest of the world cope? How would a person deal with the disappearance of a spouse, children, or parents?

Home Tom Perrotta The Leftovers. So Much to Let Go Of. I’m Glad You’re Here. Also by Tom Perrotta.

And now Tom Perrotta one-ups him by introducing the Garvey. suburban family who was left behind in the aftermath of a Rapture-like event. Before the event occurs, one character says this about the Rapture: It This is quite the literary year for ordinary families becoming enmeshed in extraordinary, indeed, catastrophic, situations. Erik Larson, in The Garden of the Beast, portrays an all-American family at the cusp of the horrendous Hitler years.

Tom Perrotta’s new novel examines how ordinary people react to extraordinary situations in the wake of a. .

Tom Perrotta’s new novel examines how ordinary people react to extraordinary situations in the wake of a rapturelike event that has whisked millions of people off the face of the earth. For those of you who wasted the spring of 2011 following less substantive stories - tornadoes, nuclear meltdowns, unrest in the Mideast, the Further Adventures of Snooki - Camping is a preacher with an apocalyptic worldview, moderately hilarious dentures and strong ideas about the biblical prophecy known as the rapture.

Tom Perrott. omfortingly televisual. Photograph: Eamonn McCabe

Tom Perrott. Photograph: Eamonn McCabe. In the mega-selling Left Behind novels, millions of Christians vanish in a puff of divine smoke called the Rapture, leaving a troubled world ripe for takeover by the Antichrist – who is, of course, secretary-general of the United Nations

Tom Perrotta's The Leftovers is a powerful and deeply moving book about regular people struggling to hold ont. or. New York Times Notable Book for 2011 A Washington Post Notable Fiction Book for 2011 The New York Times bestseller now in paperback-A thought-provoking.

Tom Perrotta's The Leftovers is a powerful and deeply moving book about regular people struggling to hold ont. New York Times Notable Book for 2011 A Washington Post Notable Fiction Book for 2011 The New York Times bestseller now in paperback-A thought-provoking engrossing novel about love, connection, and loss from the author of The Abstinence Teacher and Little Children. What if your life was upended in an instant?

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 A Washington Post Notable Fiction Book for 2011A USA Today 10 Books We Loved Reading in 2011 TitleOne of NPR’s 10 Best Novels of 2011  What if—whoosh, right now, with no explanation—a number of us simply vanished?  Would some of us collapse? Would others of us go on, one foot in front of the other, as we did before the world turned upside down?

That’s what the bewildered citizens of Mapleton, who lost many of their neighbors, friends and lovers in the event known as the Sudden Departure, have to figure out. Because nothing has been the same since it happened—not marriages, not friendships, not even the relationships between parents and children. 

Kevin Garvey, Mapleton’s new mayor, wants to speed up the healing process, to bring a sense of renewed hope and purpose to his traumatized community. Kevin’s own family has fallen apart in the wake of the disaster: his wife, Laurie, has left to join the Guilty Remnant, a homegrown cult whose members take a vow of silence; his son, Tom, is gone, too, dropping out of college to follow a sketchy prophet named Holy Wayne.  Only Kevin’s teenaged daughter, Jill, remains, and she’s definitely not the sweet “A” student she used to be.  Kevin wants to help her, but he’s distracted by his growing relationship with Nora Durst, a woman who lost her entire family on October 14th and is still reeling from the tragedy, even as she struggles to move beyond it and make a new start.

With heart, intelligence and a rare ability to illuminate the struggles inherent in ordinary lives, Tom Perrotta has written a startling, thought-provoking novel about love, connection and loss.


KiddenDan
I can see why so many people gave this book a mediocre review. It’s difficult to fathom the idea of a Rapture, and somewhat disappointing to have zero closure with the “how’s” and “why’s” of this grandiose occurrence.
I found this book deeply appealing, because the author didn’t go in that direction. This novel simply deals with the aftermath of an unexplained phenomenon.

The entire story is a gray feeling littered with underlying hopelessness. Imagine such an immense effect on any community. All of the characters react to their abysmal reality in believable ways. The younger characters dampen their pain with drugs, while others reach out to the misguided “hugging” guru while some choose to carry their guilt by joining a loveless cult. Then you have the false cheer of the mayor – while he didn’t lose anyone close to him in the Rapture - he lost those close to him to the varied escapes mentioned above.

This story isn’t going to leave the reader with many answers. It would be so nice to have the outcome tidily wrapped up in the conclusion. However, the author achieves the overall dismal and hopelessness of what the characters are still left feeling three years after this horrific incident.

Some reviews mention the lack of warmth and emotion between the characters, and I don’t know why I didn’t feel this as necessary. I think if you truly get into the book, it simply makes sense that everyone is operating on a robotic-going through the motions-level. There just doesn’t seem like there’s room for that kind of warmth. I feel like all the characters are depleted and can only conjure enough energy to survive day to day.
BroWelm
What if you were just going along in your life, doing the usual chores and maintaining the relationships that you have almost come to take for granted...and then, suddenly, everything was no longer usual? Loved ones were seemingly zapped into nothingness, with no particular rhyme or reason. You're having dinner, you go to the kitchen, and when you return your family is gone.

These are the scenarios that plague a suburban American town in The Leftovers. Truly, the ones left behind cannot understand why they were left, or why the ones "raptured," if that is what this is, were chosen. They were just ordinary people, some of them not even religious. So why?

Slowly we move through the lives of those left behind, seeing the shells that some of them have become. A few of them simply cannot stand having life that makes no sense anymore and join a cult-like group called the Guilty Remnant. These folks wear white, have taken a vow of silence, and have set themselves up to convert the others via their roles as Watchers. They follow, they stare, and they try to recruit.

In a sense, the narration feels muted and emotionless, but I believe the author purposely chose this somewhat detached style to characterize how flat the landscape is in a life that has been decimated. Emotions are tricky and they betray us. Flat, detached, going-through-the-motions life feels more appropriate, perhaps.

I liked some characters better than others, but in each case, I could see why they behaved the way they did. And throughout this story, with its unexpected ending, I felt as though they were people I could connect with...if they would allow connections to happen. As usual, Perrotta delivers a masterful story. Five stars.
OCARO
Most of Tom Perrotta's novels have been wry examinations of society and its foibles. Election, Little Children and The Abstinence Teacher each did a terrific job in chronicling the positives and negatives of human behavior. His characters aren't always sympathetic, their motivations aren't always understandable, but his books always make you think.

With his newest novel, The Leftovers, Perrotta ponders an interesting question: what if the Rapture happened, but not all of the religiously devout were taken, but instead, a random, unexplainable group of people disappeared? How would the rest of the world cope? How would a person deal with the disappearance of a spouse, children, or parents? These are the issues that the citizens of Mapleton, a small midwestern town, are confronted with when an event called the "Sudden Departure" affects the world. No one--not even religious leaders--can explain who was chosen and why, and no one can help those left behind to try and get on with their lives. Kevin Garvey, the mayor of Mapleton, lost none of his family to the Sudden Departure directly, but his family has fallen apart in the wake of the event. His wife, Laurie, joined a cult of survivors called the Guilty Remnant; his daughter, Jill, has started failing out of school and become promiscuous; and his son, Tom, dropped out of college to follow a questionable prophet named Holy Wayne. As Kevin tries to help the people of his town rebuild their lives, he embarks on a relationship with Nora Durst, whose husband and children were lost to the Departure.

I always marvel at Perrotta's storytelling ability and the way he thinks things through. He did a great job creating a post-Rapture world without actually having you experience what happened that day, so much like the characters themselves, you don't really know what happened to those who disappeared. When I finished the book, I found myself frustrated that not one character's situation was resolved, but then I realized that this must be a metaphor for how the world felt after the Sudden Departure. (It's still frustrating to me, though, that no narrative threads were wrapped up. I like some ambiguity, but this was tough.) In the end, though, this is a well-written and tremendously captivating book, and I'm so glad Perrotta is still in fine writing form.