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by Howard McCord
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United States
  • Author:
    Howard McCord
  • ISBN:
    0929701518
  • ISBN13:
    978-0929701516
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McPherson & Co; 1st edition (April 1, 1997)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1179 kb
  • ePUB format
    1321 kb
  • DJVU format
    1466 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    306
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf lrf doc


McCord makes us walk on the ridge with his anti-hero and the higher the walker gets, the deeper the reader falls, taken by. .Howard Mccord was my prof for several of my writing classes at Bowling Green State University

McCord makes us walk on the ridge with his anti-hero and the higher the walker gets, the deeper the reader falls, taken by vertigo and shot by words. Howard Mccord was my prof for several of my writing classes at Bowling Green State University. He was always a good prof and I'm returning the thoughts, and I liked the book too.

So you’re with him, walking to the Moon and he sounds like a wilderness enthusiast, a sort of.I have to thank Gallmeister for publishing McCord in France. They are a small French publisher specialised in American literature. They pick books set in the Western states of the country.

So you’re with him, walking to the Moon and he sounds like a wilderness enthusiast, a sort of walking Thoreau. He leads a frugal life, limits his interactions with the world to a minimum and enjoys his solitude. Slowly, as you spend time in Gasper’s head, you start realising that something is rotten in Gasper’s state of mind. First, he uses his container in Stern to keep guns and rifles; the man is fond of rifles.

August 17, 2010 History. The Man Who Walked to The Moon. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Man Who Walked to The Moon from your list? The Man Who Walked to The Moon. Published May 1, 2005 by McPherson & Company.

Gasper, who has nothing but the most ordinary, though singleminded, personality, walks one mountain in particular: The Moon

Gasper, who has nothing but the most ordinary, though singleminded, personality, walks one mountain in particular: The Moon. As he relates with a sharp-honed style the story of what happens on that mountain, menace and dread ever so gradually take hold, until at last the reader discovers who this man really is.

The Man Who Walked to The Moon: A Novella . Joining the fictional investigations of masculine prowess by Jim Harrison, Paul Bowles, and Thomas McGuane, there now comes this extraordinary evocation of the twin wildernesses of amorality–the natural and the human. The setting is the Steen mountains in Nevada. In this entrancingly brief novel, Howard McCord has written an eerily exacting portrait of a psyche as old as myth and as new as every politician’s nightmare. 0178X/?tag prabook0b-20.

The Man Who Walked to the Moon. LRB Merchandise - Now Shipped Worldwide.

Twelve people have walked on Earth's Moon, starting with Neil Armstrong and ending with Gene Cernan. All crewed lunar landings took place between July 1969 and December 1972 as part of the United States Apollo program. All twelve people who have walked on the Moon are American. Alan Shepard was the oldest person to walk on the Moon, at age 47 years and 80 days. Charles Duke was the youngest, at age 36 years and 201 days.

Armstrong was selected to be the first man to walk on the moon, as the . He also wrote a book with former cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, Two Sides of the Moon: Our Story of the Cold War Space Race.

Armstrong was selected to be the first man to walk on the moon, as the Apollo 11 mission was planned, for several reasons: he was the commander of the mission, he didn't have a big ego, and the door of the lunar lander was on his side. Although the first steps on the moon are what he will always be known for, Armstrong considered the mission's biggest accomplishment was landing the lunar module. Alan Shepard was a bona-fide space pioneer who cemented his spot in history long before the Apollo program. David Scott is 87 years old.

McCord is the author of over three dozen books and has given readings from his work at more than two hundred universities. His Complete Poems were published by Bloody Twin Press in 2002 and Swamp Songs & Tales, Muncie:Mississinewa Press, 2007.

A cat-and-mouse game in the hills of Nevada between a retired assassin and the man sent to assassinate him. The protagonist is William Gasper, veteran of the Korean War and professional killer, living out his retirement in solitude. On a hike one day he realizes he is being stalked.William Gasper relates the story of what happens on the Moon--a mountain in the Steen mountains of Montana--and gradually reveals who he really is and what he will do when he comes down from the mountain

Freighton
I came at this book from an unlikely angle. I'd never heard of Howard
McCord. He's certainly sanctioned by the literary community with
various awards and credentials, but in my experience such things
are inconsistently related to what I consider quality writing.

I lean towards Science Fiction, for its lack of contraints,
and so it was that I read Elizabeth Hand's review in the April
Fantasy and Science Fiction magazine. Her review was just
entraining enough for me to order the book. (Via amazon.com
of course - three days flat - hardback - signed by the author,
#744 of 1000 - very classy.)

The book is all the prior reviewers have said, and more and
less; primarily due to the author's elegant and eloquent ability
to create the presence of blackhole-like magnetic absences,
lead the reader up to their very edges, and then leave
these absences both achingly empty and full of multiple
crystalline possibilities.

McCord challenges the reader's expectations. He also inserts
just enough of the reader's reality of holding a written book
in one's hands as the window into his as-written world, that
he creates an echo of the main character finding his dream world
intrude into his reality, like the finding of an implausibly
complete cat skeleton at a too-synchronistic-to-be-real-but-it-is
time and place.

A moon kissed scene regarding the rescued woman, during a fast
backroads drive from probable pursuit:

"I knew a place in Cedar City where the woman would be safe
until she decided to move on." ". . . the woman slept. The moon
was in my face for some time, but gradually rode high above me,
and out of sight. You may wonder why the woman is in the story,
hardly speaking, hardly more than a prop. Should we fall in love?
Should we banter? Should I take her to her door? What false scenarios
our entertainments suggest! I know hurt, and I know grief, having
been the cause of much myself. There is nothing binding or erotic in
shared sorrow, in panic, in dreadful action."

I intend to read more of McCord's work. I'm embarrassed not to
have before. (I have that same 'duh' feeling I did when, after years
of reading Science Fiction, I 'discovered' Octavia Butler.) I also
hope very much to read more of the character William Gasper. He's
much too much to be kept locked in one novella. Doing so would be
like keeping a SIG 210 (or a Glock 19) locked up in the sock drawer
after firing it in the moonlight, just once.
Yggdi
The Man Who Walked To The Moon is a strange, lyrical and violent novel. It is a memoir of William Gasper -- former soldier and political assassin. It is a kind of modern myth of the interaction of men and gods. It is a discussion of the topography, geology and meteorology of the mountains of the American Southwest. It is an essay on hiking and an astute treatise on firearms and what they do.
McCord is best known as a poet. I have always had a special reverence for fiction written by poets. This is because of their mastery of language. As a practicing firearms writer I appreciate good writing in that genre. Here is some. "The .45-70 emits a deep noise, like the soul of a boulder taking leave, or the aspiration of a brontosaurus, pure, simple, rolling, as though someone delivered a telephone pole to your front porch, butt end first." Sheer poetry! This is a tough, lean book. There are no extra words. Like finding scarce water in the desert you want more.
KiddenDan
McCord's novel is a fascinating excursion in to despair amd violence. His central character, a creature out out of fantasy-fiction lacks all moral substance, and rather than showing us how humankind has honed his survival mechanisms, has developed the genes to dominate adversaries, he reveals a creature who has failed to make the ascent and has become instead a refutation of Darwin's theory. Much of the prose is clear and sparkles with an intensity that almost convinces the reader there is a substance here to be understood. Rather it hits me as a fourteen year old's fantasy of permissive and arcane sex and thrill killing, not a paradigm for human survival, I'd say. Too much warmed over Nietzschean UBERMENSCH. The myth trip with Cerridwen is original, however. You just don't find too many Celtic myths about these days--a good touch. But in the end there is nothing here of the "eternal verities," and therefore it fails the Faulkner test, no "griefs" grieving on universal bones or anyother kind of bones except the victims' of the killer. There is better evidence on its way, I feel, about the biological basis of morality trascending the misread Darwinianisms here. I suggest reading W.O. Wilson's CONSILIENCE (Knopf, 1998) for a truly scientific trip into human morality. This is a license for all those gun-lovers and road rage idiots to prove they belong because they are quicker on the draw than the rest of us. Even Clint regrets endorsing Dirty Harry's morality (see UNFORGIVEN). "I refuse to accept the end of man," W. Faulkner, 1950.