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by Anthony Trollope
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United States
  • Author:
    Anthony Trollope
  • ISBN:
    0140438440
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140438444
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Classics (July 5, 1994)
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1469 kb
  • ePUB format
    1558 kb
  • DJVU format
    1972 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    284
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf azw docx


Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire.

Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters. Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he had regained the esteem of critics by the mid-20th century.

Dr Wortle Dr Wortle's School was written late in Anthony Trollope's career and was published the year before he died

Dr Wortle Dr Wortle's School was written late in Anthony Trollope's career and was published the year before he died. My online Yahoo Trollope group has recently been reading books from the last years of Trollope's life and I think we have been looking for a decline in his power to portray the psychology of his varied characters. We did not find any such weakness. In fact, I find Dr Wortle's School full of complicated characters whose actions are not predictable and whose motives are not unmixed.

WORTLE'S SCHOOL (1881) by Anthony Trollope is a story of British Victorian social mores, and the psychological exploration of propriety.

Anthony Trollope's stock-in-trade was the life of the great drawing rooms of. .

Anthony Trollope's stock-in-trade was the life of the great drawing rooms of mid-Victorian England, where the thirst for wealth and political power and the need for love continually formed and reformed in unexpected, illuminating combinations. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. When Reverend Josiah Crawley, the impoverished curate of Hogglestock, is accused of theft it causes a public scandal, sending shockwaves through the world of Barsetshire.

by Anthony Trollope In all he wrote about 50 novels, besides books about the West Indies.

Novelist, son of Thomas Anthony Trollope, a barrister who ruined himself by speculation, and of Frances Trollope, a well-known writer, was born in London, and educated at Harrow and Winchester. His childhood was an unhappy one, owing to his father’s misfortunes. In all he wrote about 50 novels, besides books about the West Indies, North America, Australia, and South Africa, a translation of Cæsar, and monographs on Cicero and Thackeray. His novels are light of touch, pleasant, amusing, and thoroughly healthy.

Dr Wortle employs at his exclusive boys' prep school a Mr and Mrs Peacocke. Anthony Trollope (1815 - 1882) enjoyed considerable acclaim as a novelist during his lifetime, publishing over forty novels and many short stories. Mr Peacocke met his American wife in St Louis and they do not socialize with the families around them. The Warden, the first of his novels to achieve success was succeeded by the sequence of 'Barsetshire novels' and the six brilliant Palliser novels. His novels have remained well-loved today. Mick Imlah, formerly Junior Lecturer in English at Magdalen College, Oxford, is a published poet and works at the TLS. Библиографические данные.

Dr Wortle& School Anthony Trollope Penguin Books Ltd . Описание: Trollope’s delightful novel recounts the fortunes of Doctor Thorne, an upright and principled country doctor, and his niece Mary.

Dr Wortle& School Anthony Trollope Penguin Books Ltd 9780140434040 Школа доктора Уортла Троллоп: This integrated colour self-assessment book should facilitate effective student-learning in line. When Mr and Mrs Peacocke arrive as employees of Dr Wortle& school, the discovery of an irregularity in their marriage tests the character of all involved. But as Dr Wortle says, There are things which a man cannot bear. now and again a man shall make a stand in his own defence.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Authors: Trollope, Anthony, 1815-1882. Categories: Nonfiction.

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This ebook presents Dr. Wortle's School, from Anthony Trollope. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected

Wortle's School Anthony Trollope, one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists (1815-1882). This ebook presents Dr. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected. Table of contents -01- about this book -02- part I. dr wortle's school -03- chapter . r wortle -04- chapter I. he new usher -05- chapter II. he mystery -06- part II. Dr wortle's school -07- chapter I. he doctor asks his question -08- chapter . hen we must go -09- chapter V. ord carstairs -10- part III.


Urtte
I enjoyed Dr. Whortle’s School very much. I found the humor subtle and witty. The language of the author was old fashioned in both description and use as well as several words that even though I look up I couldn’t get an exact idea of their meaning. Many colloquial expressions required a great deal of thought which stopped the reading. However, even though the subject was truly beyond my comprehension the book was enjoyable. I had never read Trollope before and this was a good introduction. My book club decided to read it and most agreed with my assessment. Anyone who is interested in the cultural mores of the turn of the century in rural England will like this book. Trollope’s characters are very well defined too and some are more for comic relief I thought. There’s a little bit of adventure in it too.
Fenius
im trying to return this GD recording. Im a member of the British Trollope Society and have spent 3 years continuously reading his books and i heard a recording off the iPhone AUDIBLE that quite correctly had an English man reading a Victorian English Authors book...you could hear inflection, humor, easy to understand and enjoy the language....this recording is a ditzy California gal accent that even as an American I am struggling with so it takes away from a pretty humourous book...i tried to force myself to adapt but its clearly half assed and please...were dealing with literature here that has taken lots of work...why treat it like just so much mall talk bs...why not try to do a good job of it...its so much more fun and enjoyable...this will be returned or destroyed....
Akelevar
The story of Dr. Whortle and his school is a perfect example of the interplay between society in general and the personal/public life of a person. This short novel shows the reader how it is difficult task for a school master to endure the opinions of the parents of the boys who are enrolled in his school because those parents influenced and swayed one another to his dismay.
Llathidan
All Trollope books r good. This one funny with his idea if Americans
The Sphinx of Driz
There seems to be a problem with the Kindle file. When I downloaded it, the book opened to the second volume. I tried to go to the beginning of the book, but then it would freeze. Eventually it just gave me an "application error" screen and restarted itself.
BlackBerry
Classic Ttollope. This is one of the better books in which the author just nails human nature. It's a delight for Trollope fans from beginning to end.
Kale
Simplified and unnecessarily edited--not for real Trollope fans
This short work (under 200 pages) is not quite Anthony Trollope's shortest, but is apparently the fastest novel he wrote (finished in three weeks). Coming toward the end of his career, it feels a little bit like a throwback to the days of Barset. Indeed, with a change of setting and a few returning characters, it could easily have been a seventh in the series.

The concept is interesting enough - a teacher/clergyman in a school for boys is found to be living with his wife illegally, for her previous husband, whom they thought dead when they married, turns out to still be alive! This revelation is made in the first chapters of the book, so I'm not giving anything away here. The bulk of the novel follows the head of the school (the titular Dr. Wortle) as he stands behind his teacher and slowly watches parents remove their children from the "shocking" situation, as well as enduring flack from the local press and bishopric.

One must remember that, in the 1800s, the concept of a man and woman living together without being legally married would have been as shocking as, say, a brother and sister marrying today. The main focus of the novel is to explore the doctor's battle with pride over trying to balance handling the situation properly, versus fighting back against the people who are reacting so extremely. There is a "B" story in which the "bigamist" teacher travels with the unsavory brother of the first husband back to America, where proof supposedly waits that the man is indeed now dead. These chapters, and the character of the brother-in-law, were among the most interesting of the novel, but were sadly given very little time. There is also the "C" story of the seemingly required engagement story between Wortle's daughter and a local Lord. Even as Trollope engagement stories go, this one is incredibly tacked on and as uninteresting as they come.

All in all, I liked the plot and loved the scenes in America - I found myself wishing Trollope had maybe used this entire novel as a side story to a larger novel, as I said, perhaps set once again in Barset. The issues brought up are very interesting, but rather than really play them all out, we mostly just have the main characters monologuing to themselves about the events and how they might end, until the deus ex machina conclusion kicks in. As it stands, it was trifling and average fair for the author, and not one I would likely pick up again.

The one really interesting element is that the main character is supposedly a reflection of some of Trollope's own character traits - specifically his plutonic attachment to the American Kate Field, as seen in Wortle's harmless affection for Mrs. Peacocke. As Wortle takes flack from the press and from his wife for this borderline inappropriate relationship (in its day), he elucidates on the injustice of having foul motives assumed about him, thus enabling Trollope to trot out his own feelings on the subject. Indeed, this in many ways is the theme of the entire work, that society's misconception of people's motives is far more wicked than many of the acts people perpetrate themselves.

Don't take my three-star rating the wrong way, though - it's still worth a read if you are a fan of the author - I just wish he had gone a further distance with the setup he created.