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by Myla Goldberg
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United States
  • Author:
    Myla Goldberg
  • ISBN:
    1400078121
  • ISBN13:
    978-1400078127
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Anchor; First Edition edition (October 10, 2006)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1596 kb
  • ePUB format
    1808 kb
  • DJVU format
    1742 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    218
  • Formats:
    txt mbr lrf doc


In a multidimensional, intricately wrought narrative, Myla Goldberg leads us back to Boston in the early part of the twentieth century and into two completely captivating worlds.

In a multidimensional, intricately wrought narrative, Myla Goldberg leads us back to Boston in the early part of the twentieth century and into two completely captivating worlds. One is that of Lydia, an Irish American shopgirl with bigger aspirations than your average young woman from South Boston. She seems to be well on her way to the life she has dreamed of when she marries Henry Wickett, a shy medical student and the scion of a Boston Brahmin family.

Myla Goldberg is the author of the bestselling Bee Season, which was named a New York Times Notable Book in 2000 and made into a film, and, most recently, of Time’s Magpie, a book of essays about Prague. Her short stories have appeared in Harper’s, McSweeney’s, and failbetter. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. Библиографические данные.

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Myla Goldberg at the 2007 Brooklyn Book Festival. Myla Goldberg (born November 19, 1971) is an American novelist and musician. In 2005 Goldberg published a second novel, Wickett's Remedy (2005), which is set during the 1918 influenza epidemic

Myla Goldberg at the 2007 Brooklyn Book Festival. In 2005 Goldberg published a second novel, Wickett's Remedy (2005), which is set during the 1918 influenza epidemic. In 2009 she said she was working on a third novel, to be titled The False Friend, due in 2010. It describes a woman whose memory is jogged, causing her to revisit a tragic event in her youth "Song for Myla Goldberg" is track six on The Decemberists' album Her Majesty The Decemberists.

Acclaim for Myla Goldberg’s Wickett’s Remedy A rare and wondrous novel, a marvelous construction that captivates . Like Bee Season, this sorrowful, humorous and tender novel utterly satisfies. Congratulations to Goldberg on another masterpiece. Library Journal (starred).

Acclaim for Myla Goldberg’s Wickett’s Remedy A rare and wondrous novel, a marvelous construction that captivates even as it illuminates. Layered and ingenious. Goldberg’s compassionate narrative, cleverly enhanced by period newspaper clippings, snatches of soldiers’ conversations, songs and fictional letters, captures the essence of time and place as surely as a Norman Rockwell painting. The Orlando Sentinel. Goldberg’s writing shines.

Myla Goldberg is the author of several books, including The False Friend, Wickett’s Remedy, and the bestselling, critically acclaimed Bee Season, which was widely translated and adapted to film. Myla Goldberg is the author of several books, including The False Friend, Wickett’s Remedy, and the bestselling, critically acclaimed Bee Season, which was widely translated and adapted to film.

One day in her kitchen, Lydia Wickett devises a harmless, medicinal-tasting concoction that her enterprising husband bottles under the moniker "Wickett¹s Remedy. Myla Goldberg's unconventional second novel, named for the potion, follows the (mis)fortunes of the loving Wicketts and the strange fate of their recipe as it is reincarnated by an unscrupulous businessman as the trendy "QD Soda.

Set in Boston in the early years of the twentieth century, Wickett's Remedy follows the shifting fortunes of Lydia Kilkenny, who dreams of rising above the limitations of Southie, the hardscrabble Irish working- class neighborhood where she was born. When Lydia takes a job at Gilchrist's department store on Washington Street, she enters a glittering world that is just across the bridge from Southie, but worlds away, culturally. Here she meets the shy and refined Henry Wickett, a medical student from a Boston Brahmin family who falls in love with Lydia's vibrant.

Wickett's Remedy book. Goldberg's writing is very good and the way she plays with structure fits well with the novel as a whole. I look forward to reading more by he. .

Lydia Kilkenny is eager to move beyond her South Boston childhood, and when she marries Henry Wickett, a shy Boston Brahmin who plans to become a doctor, her future seems assured. That path changes when Henry abandons his medical studies and enlists Lydia to help him invent a mail-order medicine called Wickett’s Remedy. Then the 1918 influenza epidemic sweeps through Boston, and in a world turned upside down Lydia must forge her own path through the tragedy unfolding around her. As she secures work as a nurse at a curious island medical station conducting human research into the disease, Henry’s former business partner steals the formula for Wickett’s Remedy to create for himself a new future, trying—and almost succeeding—to erase the past he is leaving behind.Alive with narrative ingenuity, and tinged with humor as well as sorrow, this inspired recreation of a forgotten era powerfully reminds us how much individual voices matter—in history and in life.

Cae
I loved this book and highly recommend it
It gives great insight to the 1918 flu epidemic
This book is set in Boston and even has actual Boston Globe articles and headlines
Vit
I learned a lot about the Boston area and that era. So fun. I learned about the affects the flu had on the people here. Well written and so very descriptive. Great time.
Debeme
It's lovely, with an inventive narrative. The whisperers are charming, funny, and heartbreaking. A beautiful novel, especially for those who love historical fiction.
elegant stranger
This book caught my interest when I found it on a thrift store shelf. It is a multi-layered tale: the main storyline is about Lydia, a young lady living in south Boston in the early 1900's, her marriage, her husband's creation of a remedy for sickness, and then the Spanish Flu epidemic that sweeps through the country. Another layer is the social happenings of the time: advertisements of QD soda, conversations betweeen men and their concerns over the flu (I thought I knew who they were, but the author threw in a twist, which was nice), and letters from a father to a son (which also became more clear at the end). Thirdly, there is running commentary along the sides by those already deceased. I thought of these as "tweets" which sometimes run alongside a story, or a television show. They just added an interesting perspective on how memory changes over time.

This book was masterfully crafted. I'd never read anything like it. I have appreciation for how the author brought this story out, and there were some beautiful descriptions that I read over twice. My only complaint is that, for all the time I invested in reading it, I would have liked more of a wrap-up. Sure, there were hints as to how it all ended, so there's no question really. I think emotionally, a reader needs to feel a closure, and instead, I felt like I was just dropped. I enjoyed the book, and I cared about Lydia enough to stick with it. I just don't understand why an author would want to leave a bad taste in the reader's mouth by not honoring them with a real ending.
Agagamand
I am all for books with funky narrators and interesting narrative styles. Though I'm still unsure about postmodernism, I love novels that push the limits on our expectations for genre. When I picked up "Wickett's Remedy", I thought that I was just in for an interesting story on the Spanish influenza. Oh boy, how wrong I was! What I wound up with was a great novel about South Boston during WWI, but written in a style that includes voices from those who had already past. Additionally, the author uses a bit of a scrapbook technique that includes letters, newsletters, and newspaper clippings. All of these forms are beautifully woven into the story in a way that gives it many dimensions and a great story.

Lydia is an Irish girl from South Boston who yearns to live and work on Washington Avenue. While all of her neighbors are going about their lives in Southie, Lydia lands a job working at a famous department store on her dream street. It is there that she meets her future husband who is studying to be a doctor. However, he abandons that path when he and Lydia marry and instead decides to produce a remedy tonic. When the Spanish Influenza strikes, Lydia's (along with the rest of the country's) life is completely turned upside down. Her story is interspersed with newsletters regarding the world famous QD soda. These stories are masterfully braided together to reveal the full extent of Lydia's life and losses.

To say I couldn't put this book down is a grave understatement. This novel had come to my attention a couple of times before I finally picked it up. Even once I did, I was a bit startled by the fact that there is the complete text in the center of the page with a couple of lines of subscript in the margins of each page. It took a bit of time to figure out how to handle this but it soon became natural to read the standard text and then glance over at the marginal notes. The notes are written in the first person plural and seem to be from the viewpoint of those who have passed on. Typically, they are used as a way for secondary characters to voice how they viewed a certain situation. This is incredibly interesting because it shows the shortcomings of the overall narrator while calling into question our personal memories and their accuracy. Each chapter is constructed a bit like a scrapbook. The majority of the pages focus on the overall plot with the marginal notes supplementing it. Towards the end of each chapter, the author throws in some news clippings, letters, and various kinds of dialog. It's a little bit of a game to try to figure out what it all means but as it comes together it's clear that the whole book is a beautiful tapestry of narrative techniques.

As a history buff, I was extremely impressed by the amount of meticulous research the author performed. Most historical fiction focuses on a historical event but than manipulates it to fit the author's characters and views. This is not true of "Wickett's Remedy". The history is not only accurate but vital to the characters and the story. The plot is not merely dropped into a certain time period but instead is about that time and the people in it. This adds a realness to the characters that is often lacking in fiction. Overall, I think that this is a fantastic book both for its story and its technique. I have no qualms recommending it to book groups, friends, family, enemies, and strangers.
Brariel
I really enjoyed this book! Although the main story centered around the Influenza Epidemic of 1918,the second story of how Lydia's recipe was stolen kept me interested and reading to find out how things turned out. I felt the author's story of how Lydia married "up" in society was very believable. The ending did not turn out as I would have hoped, but it was realistic.

The only thing I didn't like were the notes in the margins, I thought they were very distracting so I just ignored them.

Really a great read!