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by Andrey Platonov
Download The Return fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Andrey Platonov
  • ISBN:
    1860465161
  • ISBN13:
    978-1860465161
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House UK (May 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1929 kb
  • ePUB format
    1674 kb
  • DJVU format
    1485 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    900
  • Formats:
    lit doc mbr lrf


Andrey Platonov (1899-1951), author of many stories, plays, and novels, spent years in gulags and ended his .

Andrey Platonov (1899-1951), author of many stories, plays, and novels, spent years in gulags and ended his days in poverty. His novel The Foundation Pit was published by Harvill in 1997. Best of all, perhaps, are "The River Potudan" and "The Return", both, asthe translator puts it, finely balanced between triumph and tragedy, and both dealing with the importance of accepting humanity for what it is: Platonov was a socialist, but no utopian. These two stories especially I found wonderfully moving.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. People are on the move in all ten stories in this collection-coming home as in The Return.

Start by marking The Return and Other Stories as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Return and Other Stories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Their journeys are accompanied by two motives, which characterize the writing of Andrey Platonov: optimism and faith in the goodness of humanity, and abject despair at the cruelty and apparent senselessness of our existence. The protagonists are torn between these poles and sometimes a synthesis shines through the blackness of despair-the hope against hope that a better life is still possible.

In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters you think we should include, please let us know. Success against the odds. Ten stories of people on the move, fleeing from cruelty and poverty, yearning for death or a better life. Gruesome descriptions of want and pain make this a harrowing read.

Listen to books in audio format. The story exposes the ways of thinking promulgated by the Communist propaganda in 1920s and 1930s and throws in quite a few realistic facts of everyday Soviet life in those times. It includes the harrowing novella Dzahn ( Soul ), in which a young man returns to his Asian birthplace to find his people deprived not only of food and dwelling, but of memory and speech, and The Potudan River, Platonov’s most celebrated story.

Platonov served as a war correspondent during World War II and wrote The Return upon his own homecoming. Russian writers struggle to describe to non-Russian readers the strangeness of Platonov's prose. The story was vilified; the author died five years later in obscurity and poverty. His work did not appear widely in Russia until the late 1980s. Platonov writes as though no one before him had ever written anything, as if he were the first person to take pen to paper, writes Tatiana Tolstaya.

Second, Platonov is hard to translate: in the early 1990s we were working in the dark . During the last 15 years, however, I have regularly attended Platonov seminars and conferences in Moscow and Petersburg. You've argued that Russians will eventually come to recognise Platonov as their greatest prose writer. Given that he's up against titans such as Gogol, Tolstoy and Chekhov this is quite a claim. The Return was viciously criticised, but it was published in a journal with a huge circulation and may well have been read by hundreds of thousands of people. And there is no knowing how important Platonov's example was to younger writers.

Combining scientific realism with a poetic vision and elements of folk tale, this text of ten stories presents the dreams of the builders of socialism.

Select Format: Paperback. Combining scientific realism with a poetic vision and elements of folk tale, this text of ten stories presents the dreams of the builders of socialism. ISBN13:9781860465161. Release Date:May 1999.

People are on the move in all ten stories in this collection—coming home as in The Return, leaving home as in Rubbish Wind, traveling far away from their country as in The Locks of Epiphan—trying to improve their lives and those of others, searching and fleeing. Their journeys are accompanied by two motives, which characterize the writing of Andrey Platonov: optimism and faith in the goodness of humanity, and abject despair at the cruelty and apparent senselessness of our existence. The protagonists are torn between these poles and sometimes a synthesis shines through the blackness of despair—the hope against hope that a better life is still possible. Combining realism with poetic vision and the deceptively simple language of folktales, Platonov lights up his stories by using language in a way that renders it unfamiliar, making the ordinary seem unusual and the extraordinary logical. This new translation is the first to present Platonov's gift as a short-story writer to an English-language readership, showing why it is that Joseph Brodsky regarded Platonov as the equal of Joyce, Kafka, and Proust.

Blackworm
In "The Epifan Locks", Peter the Great orders an English engineer to build a network of locks and canals across Russia: nothing, not even human lives, is to stand in the way. Another story ("Lobskaya Hill") focuses on a man who has lost all that he has valued, and now, grief-stricken, lives in a sort of limbo between life and death. "Rubbish Wind" is so black and horrifying that even the most jaded of modern readers may be shocked; while "The Cow", written when Platonov's own teenage son was in a labour camp, describes with some tenderness how a cow dies of grief after its calf is taken to the abattoir. Best of all, perhaps, are "The River Potudan" and "The Return", both, asthe translator puts it, finely balanced between triumph and tragedy, and both dealing with the importance of accepting humanity for what it is: Platonov was a socialist, but no utopian. These two stories especially I found wonderfully moving.
This varied collection of stories was, for me, an excellent introduction to a writer of clearly major importance. Written mainly during the darkest days of Stalinism, they are a testament to the heroism involved merely in maintaining one's humanity.
Cordaron
This is an excellent collection of varied stories by a deeply troubled storyteller. From an Englishman designing canals for Peter the Great to returning World War I veterans to a young engineer trying to keep a village supplied with electricity, the characters are richly and movingly drawn. In their pessimism or difficult optimism, the stories easily demonstrate why they would not be favorites of the Soviet authorities, in spite of the author's communist beliefs; they are about the farthest thing imaginable from "socialist realism." (One is reminded of the complaints of Shostakovich -- not exactly a traditional dissident, either -- in his autobiography, Testamony, that the authorities evaluated his music based on the percentage of measures set in major vs. minor keys.) Several of the stories are powerful and quite memorable. Still, in spite of the encomia of the translator/reviewer above, it is hard for me to see that Platonov belongs in the highest ranks of 20th century Russian writers. Perhaps he simply loses too much in translation. I find (the English translations of) a number of other modern Russians to be much more compelling: Aksyanov, Bulgakov, Eppel, Grossman, Pelevin, and Ulitskaya, for example.
Leceri
I am a collector of Russian novelists and short story writers. I am a huge fan of Gogol, Bulgakov, Nabokov, and more recently Grossman. Platonov is another wonderful example of a unique Russian writer. These stories are not only precise and highly-visual, they are uniquely constructed and they somehow get to the emotional heart of things without sentimentality. You cannot read this collection without coming away from it with your world-view altered. The translation is excellent. I am frequently irritated by translations that are either too literal or take too many liberties. This translation is perfect, as far as I'm concerned.