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by Peter Stafford Carey
Download The Fat Man in History fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Peter Stafford Carey
  • ISBN:
    0702230200
  • ISBN13:
    978-0702230202
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Queensland Pr (Australia) (October 1, 1998)
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1230 kb
  • ePUB format
    1213 kb
  • DJVU format
    1628 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    369
  • Formats:
    txt lit docx doc


A landmark in contemporary Australian literature, The Fat Man in History brought early acclaim to Peter Carey for his brilliant and ingenious fiction.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). A landmark in contemporary Australian literature, The Fat Man in History brought early acclaim to Peter Carey for his brilliant and ingenious fiction. These twelve stories introduce visionary landscapes of intense clarity, where the rules of the game are bizarre yet chillingly familiar. PETER CAREY is the author of thirteen previous novels.

Читать онлайн - Carey Peter. The Fat Man in History aka Exotic Pleasures Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн The Fat Man in History aka Exotic Pleasures. The Fat Man in History 1. His feet are sore.

Peter Carey’s first work was somehow recognizable as Australia or parts of the world that Australians might visit. Yet, it was somehow also otherworldly (like "Mad Max"). This world was a product of the imagination.

Peter Carey was born in Bacchus Marsh, Victoria, in 1943. His parents ran a General Motors dealership, Carey Motors. Most of these were collected in his first book, The Fat Man In History, which appeared in 1974. He attended Bacchus Marsh State School from 1948 to 1953, then boarded at Geelong Grammar School between 1954 and 1960. In 1961, Carey enrolled in a science degree at the new Monash University in Melbourne, majoring in chemistry and zoology, but cut his studies short because of a car accident and a lack of interest. In the same year Carey moved to Balmain in Sydney to work for Grey Advertising.

The electrified fence stretches across the desert, north to south, south to north, going as far as the eye can see without bending or altering course. Only at dusk do they return to their true positions. With the exception of the break at the soldier’s post the ten foot high electrified fence is uninterrupted

Fantoni’s loud raucous laugh comes from even further away. The-man-who-won’t-give-his-name is knocking on the ceiling of his room with a broom. Finch can hear it going, bump, bump, bump. The Sibelius record jumps. May shouts, quit it. Milligan says, I want to tell you something.

Fantoni’s loud raucous laugh comes from even further away. May shouts, no you don’t. Finch lies naked on top of the blue sheets and tries to hum the albatross song but he has forgotten it.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Peter Stafford Carey books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Fat Man in History, and Other Stories. Peter Stafford Carey.

The first collection of short stories published by Peter Carey, whose other books include Bliss, Illywhacker and Oscar and Lucinda, which was awarded the 1988 Booker Prize

The first collection of short stories published by Peter Carey, whose other books include Bliss, Illywhacker and Oscar and Lucinda, which was awarded the 1988 Booker Prize. The stories, set in an ominous near-future that has a feel of contemporary life, are by turn bizarre and funny. The Fat Man in History aka Exotic Pleasures1. The Fat Man in History.

A landmark in contemporary Australian literature, The Fat Man in History brought early acclaim to Peter Carey for his brilliant and ingenious fiction. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

A landmark in contemporary Australian literature, The Fat Man in History, brought early acclaim to Carey for his brilliant and ingenious fiction. These twelve stories introduce visionary landscapes of intense clarity, where the rules of the game are bizarre yet chillingly familiar.

Kecq
"The Fat Man in History" collects but a few great stories by Peter Carey. After reading a few of these stories, you won't be satisfied knowing there are more out there -- therefore the preferred and complete collection is "Collected Stories." Check out my review of Carey's "Collected Stories" here which includes all of the stories found in "The Fat Man in History."

"Collected Stories" by Peter Carey.

Here are the complete (26) short stories of Peter Carey in a single volume, including those collected in the books "The Fat Man in History" (Crabs, Peeling, Life & Death in the South Side Pavilion, Room No. 5 (Escribo), Happy Story, A Windmill in the West, Withdrawal, Report on the Shadow Industry, Conversations with Unicorns, American Dreams, and The Fat Man in History), "War Crimes" (The Journey of a Lifetime, Do You Love Me?, The Uses of Williamson Wood, The Last days of a Famous Mime, A Schoolboy Prank, The Chance, Fragrance of Roses, The Puzzling Nature of Blue, Kristu Du, He Found Her in Late Summer, Exotic Pleasures, and War Crimes), along with 3 previously unpublished works (Joe, Concerning the Greek Tyrant, and A Million Dollars Worth of Amphetamines).

Peter Carey has risen to fame as a novelist, having gained notoriety from such works as Oscar and Lucinda (which garnered him the Booker Prize), Jack Maggs, The True History of the Kelly Gang, and My Life as a Fake. However, like most writers, his debut publications were short story collections and "Collected Stories" finds his mini-masterpieces all in one place. I started reading Carey during a brief residence in Melbourne (I'm a short story fan and was looking for an Australian writer to compliment my travels -- I think it was a travel guide that pointed me to Peter Carey). I bought "The Fat Man in History," but after being blown away by the first few stories, I returned it for the complete "Collected Stories" and never looked back.

Many of the stories have a surrealistic plot, such as "Do You Love Me?" in which the work of cartographers plays a role in the dematerialization of places and people, "Life and Death in the South Side Pavilion" in which a man attempts to shepherd a group of horses that keep dying by falling into a pool of water, "Peeling" in which a man's lover unravels into nothingness, or "Exotic Pleasures" in which captivatingly beautiful birds murderously overwhelm the world. Others center on human relationships, such as "Room No. 5 (Escribo)" in which a couple traveling in a foreign land fall in love in the midst of a military coup, "Happy Story" in which a man balances his love for his girlfriend with his passion for flying, "The Uses of Williamson Wood" in which a woman confronts her abuser, and "He Found Her in Late Summer" in which a man sacrifices himself for his lover. The stories are difficult to describe further because they're not really "like" many other authors I can think of. The language and character interaction are spare but powerful (reminiscent of Joe Frank -- see joefrank.com), the stories are brief, often divided into terse sections/chapters and focusing on the bizarre or fantastic (like Vonnegut), and there is a recurring theme of futility in impossible situations and suggesting a larger metaphorical meaning (evoking Kafka). Each tale leaves a strong emotional impression -- I found myself eager to read the next, but not wanting to finish too soon and exhaust the supply either.

Although "Collected Stories" is the complete collection of Carey's short works, it isn't as available (in the U.S.) as is "The Fat Man in History." But trust me, after reading a few of these stories, you won't be satisfied knowing there are more out there.

After reading this short story collection, I tried a few of Carey's novels. None ever matched the power of these short works. There have only been a few other authors whose stories made such a mark. I also happened to read "Letter to Our Son" by Carey while browsing in a bookstore -- a very short tribute to his son's birth, but also great little story that sticks in my memory.
Debeme
Will Self, T.C. Boyle and Haruki Murakami wish they wrote stories as brilliant as ones written by Peter Carey. In fact, if you're in the UK, pick up Collected Stories for all-inclusive brilliance. Not as self-indulgent or inscrutable as Self, quieter than Boyle, more clever than Murakami (and I do like these guys), Carey shows his ability here in different ways than with his novels. He understands what short stories can and should be. Anyone who likes the form, or who often doesn't have time for a lot of fiction but wishes he/she did, might want to track this down.