Download Red Ant House Pa fb2

by Ann Cummins
Download Red Ant House Pa fb2
Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Author:
    Ann Cummins
  • ISBN:
    0618269258
  • ISBN13:
    978-0618269259
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Mariner; First Edition edition (April 7, 2003)
  • Pages:
    179 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1911 kb
  • ePUB format
    1718 kb
  • DJVU format
    1575 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    635
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi azw rtf


Ann Cummins sets most of the twelve stories in her debut collection, RED ANT HOUSE, in small desert . Ann Cummins is fantastic! I read the title story in McSweeney's and then flipped when I found out about this collection.

Ann Cummins sets most of the twelve stories in her debut collection, RED ANT HOUSE, in small desert towns and reservation communities that dot the American Southwest -- locales surrounded by "miles and miles of sand" and not much else. Her stories, mostly concerning working class folk, are both tender and brutal. the OilCan highly recommends.

Red ant house : stories, Ann Cummins, p. c. The first time I saw this girl she was standing at the bottom of the coal pile. I thought she was a little wrinkled dwarf woman, with her sucked-in cheeks and pointed chin. She had narrow legs and yellow eyes. cm. A Manner original. Contents: Red ant house-Trapeze-The shiprock fair-Blue fly-Where I work-Crazy. War is a voice on the phone-The hypnotist’s Starburst-Billy by the bay. ISBN 0-618-26925-8. 1. Southwestern States-Social life and customs-Fiction. They had just moved into the old Perino house on West 2nd. This was the red ant house.

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Again and again, Ann Cummins generates imagery of white-hot intensity and pushes the limits of both the human spirit and the short story form.

Again and again, Ann Cummins generates imagery of white-hot intensity and pushes the limits of both the human spirit and the short story form. Gritty, seductive, and always daring, this unforgettable collection puts forth a haunting new vision of hope and heartache in contemporary America and confirms the arrival of an important new voice.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Denis Johnson meets Flannery OConnor in this luminous collection of short stories about the collision of cultures, genders, and generations in the American Southwest.

Fiction Family Life Short Stories Psychological. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Hypnotic short stories of life in the Southwest that emanate suspense, inspiring page-turning tension (The Washington. Remove from Wishlist. Or, get it for 6400 Kobo Super Points!

Ann Cummins is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Arizona writing programs. She is the author of Red Ant House, a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller and Best Book of the Year.

Ann Cummins is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Arizona writing programs. The recipient of a Lannan fellowship, she divides her time between Oakland, California, where she lives with her husband, and Flagstaff, Arizona, where she teaches creative writing at Northern Arizona University

Ann Cummins (Cummins, Ann). used books, rare books and new books. Find signed collectible books: 'Red Ant House Pa'.

Ann Cummins (Cummins, Ann). Find all books by 'Ann Cummins' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Ann Cummins'. The Job Evaluation Handbook: A Guide to Achieving Equal Pay. by Michael Armstrong, Ann Cummins, Sue Hastings, Willie Wood. The Reward Management Toolkit: A Step-by-Step Guide to Designing and Delivering Pay and Benefits. by Michael Armstrong, Ann Cummins.

Denis Johnson meets Flannery O’Connor in this luminous collection of short stories about the collision of cultures, genders, and generations in the American Southwest. Set mainly amid Indian reservations and uranium mills, these twelve stories create a kaleidoscopic view of family, myth, love, landscape, and loss in a place where infinite skies and endless roads suggest a world of possibility, yet dreams are deceiving, like an oasis, just beyond reach. Whether it’s a young woman pushed quite literally to the edge on a desolate mountain pass, an orphaned brother and sister trying to patch together an existence one stitch at a time, a cop who suspects his kleptomaniac wife is stealing from other people — materially and emotionally — or a wily roadside hypnotist whose alleged power is both wonderful and strange, Ann Cummins’s characters want to transcend the circumstances of their lives, to believe in the eventuality of change. Again and again, Ann Cummins generates imagery of white-hot intensity and pushes the limits of both the human spirit and the short story form. Gritty, seductive, and always daring, this unforgettable collection puts forth a haunting new vision of hope and heartache in contemporary America and confirms the arrival of an important new voice.

Matty
A series of short stories writtin in a somewhat dark and twisted style...my kind of style. I enjoyed this book and read through it very quickly.
Sudert
12 stories, previously published in Hayden's Ferry Review (1); McSweeney's (3); The New Yorker (3); A Room of One's Own (1); Sonora Review (1). Psychological subtlety and detailed, vivid description of settings, especially western US deserts and mountains. Several stories take p.o.v. of an adolescent girl -- either white or Navajo -- on or near a Navajo reservation. The McSweeney's stories are the strangest, "The Hypnotist's Trailer" being a magical realist allegorical fable about corrupt petty power further corrupting its holder (the hypnotist takes a belly button from a woman, turns it into things large and small, and finally find it has grown and adhered to his hand). Cummins often develops a story to an approaching crisis and ends it -- sometimes in mid-air, as in "Billy by the Bay" (desperate Billy jumps off a pier). "Headhunter" (from Hayden's Ferry Rev) leaves us wondering what the heroine will do now that she has unintentionally caused a man's death on the highway; she seems weird enough to do almost anything, but we don't know. My favorite is "Bitterwater" (from the New Yorker), told by the white woman who has married a powerfully attractive, crazy and usually drunk Navajo; will she take him back from the detox center or not? Don't know. I would read more work by this surprising writer.
Vertokini
Ann Cummins sets most of the twelve stories in her debut collection, RED ANT HOUSE, in small desert towns and reservation communities that dot the American Southwest --- locales surrounded by "miles and miles of sand" and not much else. This extreme setting, which she evokes through tactile details, informs almost every aspect of the book, creating an atmosphere of hostile uncertainty, determining the course of characters' actions, affecting and even invading them: "The inside of the cab felt like sand, and so did the inside of her mouth," Cummins writes in "Headhunter." "The tops of her arms had separated into hundreds of little lines, and her hand, when she touched it to her tongue, tasted like salt . . . The absence of moisture gave the landscape an edge, like glass."
Cummins, who studied and now teaches creative writing at Northern Arizona University, uses this jagged terrain to create tension in her stories and evoke the desolation of its inhabitants. She renders this landscape in rough-hewn prose that bursts with short, targeted sentences and blunt declarations of brutal insights. The result is a collection of textured stories that are shorn of all unnecessary words and details: they are rangy but precise, unpredictable but seemingly ineluctable.
Several of the stories here, including "Bitterwater" and the standout "Trapeze," are about whites living on reservations, "company people" who feel like outsiders and who chafe at the wide-open boredom of the desert. They feel constantly on their guard, never at home in their own homes, and always looking beyond the horizon for a means of escape.
Theirs is an anywhere-but-here mentality. In the short "Dr. War Is a Voice on the Phone," Dina abandons her sick aunt and her uncle snoring in his chair to join a man who called her out of the blue. For her, strangers like Dr. War are preferable to family, and the unknown --- despite its threats and dangers --- is more attractive than the known.
Cummins writes persuasively about this need for escape, which is strongest and most artfully pronounced in the stories narrated by young girls just reaching or still suffering through adolescence, frightened by the demands of adulthood and the larger world. In "Where I Work," a young woman cherishes her new apartment and dreams about how she will furnish it, yet she cannot hold down a job to pay for it. In "Bitterwater," Brenda rushes into a teenage marriage to a Todacheene Indian named Manny, only to watch him grow from an idealistic young man into a jaded drunk.
"Whatever's happening inside you," a cancer-ridden mother tells her son, Peter, in "Crazy Yellow," "remember that you are about to change. If you feel like you're in a well, you're about to climb out of it. That's the nature of life." She doesn't warn him, however, about the terrors that await him on the surface. Left alone while his mother undergoes more tests, Peter stirs up more trouble for himself than he could imagine. The tragic inevitability of climbing out of that well makes this and the other stories in RED ANT HOUSE so devastating.
Ultimately, these characters long for "one sweet moment" away from the world and all its troubles. Few of them get to enjoy it, but their dreams of something more than the wasteland around them enliven these solid, sturdy stories and reveal Cummins as a genuinely talented and immensely sensitive writer.
--- Reviewed by Stephen M. Deusner
Usic
The first story in this collection, "Red Ant House" is an absolute gem. It captures the two little girls' world with starling accuracy and childlike candor. "Trapeze" and "Crazy Yellow" are also standouts, excellent and fascinating.

Many of the stories in this collection are coming-of-age tales with a child or teenage protagonist growing up in an atmosphere of poverty, boredom and loneliness where the child's imagination provides an escape from everyday reality. The stories are primarily set in desert towns in the American Southwest. At times, Cummins' writing is so effective you can practically feel the blazing sun and blowing sand.
ME
These stories of drifting, down-and-out, disenfranchised characters searching for redemption read with the bleakness of the landscape of one of Georgia O'Keeffe's Southwestern paintings - which is no coincidence as that is the setting. The circumstances of each of these stories are odd, a fact that adds to their drawing power. We get to peek behind the scenes within a hypnotist's trailer as well as within the mind of a child waiting to meet a man who may be a pedophile.
Author Cummings' stories take place in the realm of endless deserts and bleached skies, and her brilliant prose sears with the power of a relentless sun.
Super-fine.
Nten
2003 is shaping up to be a really great year for short story lovers. Already this year John Murray published "A Few Short Notes on Tropical Butterflies," ZZ Packer published "Drinking Coffee Elsewhere," and now Ann Cummins gives us the terrific "Red Ant House." These stories are the best single collection I've read since Flannery O'Conner published "A Good Man is Hard to Find." The characters are real and the stories are memorable. I've read Cummins in the "New Yorker" and in the "Best American Short Stories," but it is a real treat to have 12 of her stories in one book. She's just about as good as it gets when it comes to short stories. Happy reading!
Goltizuru
Ann Cummins is fantastic! I read the title story in McSweeney's and then flipped when I found out about this collection. Her stories, mostly concerning working class folk, are both tender and brutal. the OilCan highly recommends
Every story in the collection is beautifully written, but the title story is, honestly, one of my all time favorite short stories!